The Feed

The Feed

October 25, 2017
SBS VICELAND  |  October 25, 2017

News. People. Culture. Daily. Tonight: The effects of climate change are already reshaping America. From Alaska to Florida, Jan Fran tours the US to see how climate shifts are changing the map.

News. People. Culture. Daily. Tonight: The effects of climate change are already reshaping America. From Alaska to Florida, Jan Fran tours the US to see how climate shifts are changing the map.

Authorities fear copy-cat tampering in fruit contamination disaster
Since the story strawberry tampering broke more than 100 reports of contaminated fruit have been made around the country, sparking fears of copy-cat tampering. Authorities are scrambling to manage this slow-moving disaster as they try to limit the damage to an industry worth almost half a billion dollars.
 
Why are female Liberal MPs quitting Federal politics?
A number of female Liberal MPs have spoken out against internal party dynamics, while also announcing they won’t recontest the next election. But Prime Minister Scott Morrison insisting there is not a behaviour problem in Canberra.
 
Christian Porter discusses strawberry tampering and sexism in politics
Federal Attorney General, Christian Porter, talks to 7.30 about news laws introduced to counter the growing strawberry tampering crisis, and whether the Liberal Party has a problem with women.
 
Marine archaeologists may have discovered the wreck of the Endeavour
Historian David Hunt explains why the discovery of Capt. James Cook's ship, HMS Endeavour, would be an important moment in Australia's history.
 
Meet Alec Knight, the first Australian male to join the New York City Ballet
Alec Knight was just 17 when he moved to New York after being offered a coveted apprenticeship with the New York City Ballet. That was five years ago. Now he's the first Australian male to be given a contract with the prestigious ballet company.

7.30: September 19, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
30:05
Authorities fear copy-cat tampering in fruit contamination disaster Since the story strawberry tampering broke more than 100 reports of contaminated fruit have been made around the country, sparking fears of copy-cat tampering. Authorities are scrambling to manage this slow-moving disaster as they try to limit the damage to an industry worth almost half a billion dollars. Why are female Liberal MPs quitting Federal politics? A number of female Liberal MPs have spoken out against internal party dynamics, while also announcing they won’t recontest the next election. But Prime Minister Scott Morrison insisting there is not a behaviour problem in Canberra. Christian Porter discusses strawberry tampering and sexism in politics Federal Attorney General, Christian Porter, talks to 7.30 about news laws introduced to counter the growing strawberry tampering crisis, and whether the Liberal Party has a problem with women. Marine archaeologists may have discovered the wreck of the Endeavour Historian David Hunt explains why the discovery of Capt. James Cook's ship, HMS Endeavour, would be an important moment in Australia's history. Meet Alec Knight, the first Australian male to join the New York City Ballet Alec Knight was just 17 when he moved to New York after being offered a coveted apprenticeship with the New York City Ballet. That was five years ago. Now he's the first Australian male to be given a contract with the prestigious ballet company.
Ten years on from the GFC are we heading for another crash?
This week marks a decade since the collapse of the US investment bank Lehman Brothers triggered the worst global financial crisis since the Great Depression. While much of the world fell into prolonged recession, Australia's economy narrowly avoided that fate but 10 years on, many individual Australians are still paying the price.
 
Phil Coorey reviews the Morrison government's first parliamentary week
The Morrison Governments' first parliamentary week has done little to settle the dust after the downfall of Malcolm Turnbull three weeks ago. The AFR's chief political correspondent, Phil Coorey looks at how it has performed.
 
Sydney light rail project won't break-even, NSW Cabinet told in 2012
Over time, and over budget, Sydney's floundering light rail project is wreaking havoc on businesses and commuters in the country's largest city. Leaked NSW cabinet documents point to a political culture where economic caution is thrown out the window in the rush to approve expensive and ultimately disruptive schemes.
 
Search on for Australia's next big diamond deposit
Of all the minerals dug out of the ground, diamonds have a special allure and Australia produces some of the most sought-after stones in the world. But the nation's sole operating diamond mine is on the verge of closure. That's led to a flurry of exploration to find a new diamond deposit.
 
Technology offering blind people the chance to borrow someone else's eyes
Imagine borrowing the eyes of someone on the other side of the world. That's what technology is now offering more than half a million Australians who are blind or vision impaired, via free, and paid, apps on their smart phones.

7.30: September 13, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
32:16
Ten years on from the GFC are we heading for another crash? This week marks a decade since the collapse of the US investment bank Lehman Brothers triggered the worst global financial crisis since the Great Depression. While much of the world fell into prolonged recession, Australia's economy narrowly avoided that fate but 10 years on, many individual Australians are still paying the price. Phil Coorey reviews the Morrison government's first parliamentary week The Morrison Governments' first parliamentary week has done little to settle the dust after the downfall of Malcolm Turnbull three weeks ago. The AFR's chief political correspondent, Phil Coorey looks at how it has performed. Sydney light rail project won't break-even, NSW Cabinet told in 2012 Over time, and over budget, Sydney's floundering light rail project is wreaking havoc on businesses and commuters in the country's largest city. Leaked NSW cabinet documents point to a political culture where economic caution is thrown out the window in the rush to approve expensive and ultimately disruptive schemes. Search on for Australia's next big diamond deposit Of all the minerals dug out of the ground, diamonds have a special allure and Australia produces some of the most sought-after stones in the world. But the nation's sole operating diamond mine is on the verge of closure. That's led to a flurry of exploration to find a new diamond deposit. Technology offering blind people the chance to borrow someone else's eyes Imagine borrowing the eyes of someone on the other side of the world. That's what technology is now offering more than half a million Australians who are blind or vision impaired, via free, and paid, apps on their smart phones.
Banned Chinese cameras are being used by the Australian Government
Security cameras made by Chinese surveillance companies are also being used at a series of classified facilities including an Adelaide Air Force base and a Canberra office block home to an annexe of the nation's intelligence agencies.
 
Lynette Dawson's niece, Renee Sims, and journalist Hedley Thomas discuss new search for missing woman
Renee Simms, niece of missing woman Lyn Dawson, and Hedley Thomas, the journalist behind the Teacher's Pet podcast, discuss today's news that police are digging at the former property of Lyn Dawson and her husband.
 
Can women change the political culture?
The treatment of women in politics has been a hot subject of debate in recent months with allegations of slut shaming, and during the Liberals' leadership turmoil, accusations of bullying and bad behaviour. The big question is, will anything really change?
 
Cerebral palsy treatment creating an international bond of friendship between two families
Last year we told the story about Max Shearman whose dad Michael carried the then six-year-old along the gruelling Kokoda track to raise money for a trial of technology called a TheraSuit. While the pair was on that mission, they built a relationship with a local Papua New Guinea family also searching for help with their daughter's cerebral palsy diagnosis. That family recently travelled to Melbourne for three weeks of intensive treatment.

7.30: September 12, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
29:01
Banned Chinese cameras are being used by the Australian Government Security cameras made by Chinese surveillance companies are also being used at a series of classified facilities including an Adelaide Air Force base and a Canberra office block home to an annexe of the nation's intelligence agencies. Lynette Dawson's niece, Renee Sims, and journalist Hedley Thomas discuss new search for missing woman Renee Simms, niece of missing woman Lyn Dawson, and Hedley Thomas, the journalist behind the Teacher's Pet podcast, discuss today's news that police are digging at the former property of Lyn Dawson and her husband. Can women change the political culture? The treatment of women in politics has been a hot subject of debate in recent months with allegations of slut shaming, and during the Liberals' leadership turmoil, accusations of bullying and bad behaviour. The big question is, will anything really change? Cerebral palsy treatment creating an international bond of friendship between two families Last year we told the story about Max Shearman whose dad Michael carried the then six-year-old along the gruelling Kokoda track to raise money for a trial of technology called a TheraSuit. While the pair was on that mission, they built a relationship with a local Papua New Guinea family also searching for help with their daughter's cerebral palsy diagnosis. That family recently travelled to Melbourne for three weeks of intensive treatment.
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