The Feed

The Feed

November 14, 2017
SBS VICELAND  |  November 14, 2017
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News. People. Culture. Daily. Tonight: a special half-hour investigation. Hopeful migrants to Australia are paying middle-men tens of thousands of dollars for sham visas that often never eventuate.

News. People. Culture. Daily. Tonight: a special half-hour investigation. Hopeful migrants to Australia are paying middle-men tens of thousands of dollars for sham visas that often never eventuate.

Is Trump's 'zero-tolerance' immigration policy violating human rights? In the days following Trump's U-turn, this program follows one family's fight to get their seven-year-old son back, after he was taken away at the border.
“Hug your son because you’re not going to see him anymore,”  Ludy Garcia was told at the U.S. Border.
Under President Trump’s Zero Tolerance Policy which took effect in April this year, immigrant children were housed in shelters, separated from their families, for an average of 41 days. Ludy’s 7-year-old son, Osmin, spent 51 days in detention between May and July this year.
Ludy and  Osmin are just two of the many victims of family separation at the U.S. border, who fled their homes under threats of gang violence and extortion.  
On April 6 2018, Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced a new policy for an "escalated effort to prosecute those who choose to illegally cross our border." 
Trump’s administration has directed federal prosecutors to prioritise immigration cases. Athough the policy does not explicitly call for the separation of parent and child, in practice, it does precisely that: While parents are taken to be prosecuted, their children are left with a sponsor or at a shelter.
Back home in Guatemala, mother Lesbia is at the family’s hut, eagerly awaiting her weekly phone call with Osmin – all she knows is that he has been taken to a shelter in Arizona.
“Every time I go to sleep, I pray for you,” Osmin sobs into the phone.

Dateline: Trump's Zero Tolerance

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
26:00
Is Trump's 'zero-tolerance' immigration policy violating human rights? In the days following Trump's U-turn, this program follows one family's fight to get their seven-year-old son back, after he was taken away at the border. “Hug your son because you’re not going to see him anymore,” Ludy Garcia was told at the U.S. Border. Under President Trump’s Zero Tolerance Policy which took effect in April this year, immigrant children were housed in shelters, separated from their families, for an average of 41 days. Ludy’s 7-year-old son, Osmin, spent 51 days in detention between May and July this year. Ludy and Osmin are just two of the many victims of family separation at the U.S. border, who fled their homes under threats of gang violence and extortion. On April 6 2018, Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced a new policy for an "escalated effort to prosecute those who choose to illegally cross our border." Trump’s administration has directed federal prosecutors to prioritise immigration cases. Athough the policy does not explicitly call for the separation of parent and child, in practice, it does precisely that: While parents are taken to be prosecuted, their children are left with a sponsor or at a shelter. Back home in Guatemala, mother Lesbia is at the family’s hut, eagerly awaiting her weekly phone call with Osmin – all she knows is that he has been taken to a shelter in Arizona. “Every time I go to sleep, I pray for you,” Osmin sobs into the phone.
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