Sunday Night

Sunday Night

House of Horrors/Coldplay/Thank You Mr Harper!
Seven  |  May 18, 2014
Classification: Not Classified Classification: Not Classified
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Michelle Knight's ordeal is impossible to comprehend - more than a decade of torture, rape and captivity by the hands of Ariel Castro. One year since her miraculous rescue, she tells us about the monstrous mind of Castro, her former prison and how she is moving on. We have an exclusive interview with popular band Coldplay where they reveal footage of the first performance from their new album and set the record straight on the brutally raw lyrics. Then, we meet an Aussie dad who has saved countless lives by building the largest planned refugee camp in history to house the daily flood of Syrians crossing the border to Jordan. Hosted by Chris Bath.

Michelle Knight's ordeal is impossible to comprehend - more than a decade of torture, rape and captivity by the hands of Ariel Castro. One year since her miraculous rescue, she tells us about the monstrous mind of Castro, her former prison and how she is moving on. We have an exclusive interview with popular band Coldplay where they reveal footage of the first performance from their new album and set the record straight on the brutally raw lyrics. Then, we meet an Aussie dad who has saved countless lives by building the largest planned refugee camp in history to house the daily flood of Syrians crossing the border to Jordan. Hosted by Chris Bath.

The Fugitive
For 20 years, Lee Barnett was on the run from police, a wanted woman. Caught up in a fierce custody battle, she kidnapped her baby daughter and fled the US, criss-crossing three continents to evade capture. Lee finally settled on Queensland's Sunshine Coast, and got on with her life until the FBI turned up on her doorstep. Now, for the first time since being released from prison, Lee is able to tell the full story of her life as a fugitive - a secret hidden from even her own children. But that story is far from over. Lee is now campaigning to be reunited with her children in Australia.

Hooked
From the outside looking in, rugby league legend Matt Cooper has it all - a beautiful wife, two healthy girls, a luxurious home and a place in Australian sporting history. But until recently, Matt had a dark secret - a secret that almost cost him everything. He was hiding a severe addiction to prescription drugs. Opioid addiction doesn't discriminate, hundreds of Australians die every year, and thousands more are hopelessly hooked on strong pain killers. From superstars like actor Heath Ledger to everyday mums. Sunday Night's Alex Cullen presents this special health report.

Reach for the Sky
Andy Hensel was a high-flying freestyle motocross star, fearless and always up for a challenge. But six years ago, his dream run came to a tragic end. Andy took off up a ramp hurtling more than 20 metres in the air, and missed the landing. He crashed the bike, broke his back and crushed his spinal cord. The accident left him a paraplegic. Enough, you'd think, to ground him forever. Not Andy. Sunday Night is there as he bravely attempts to fly again.

Sunday Night: The Fugitive/Hooked/Reach for the Sky

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
43:59
The Fugitive For 20 years, Lee Barnett was on the run from police, a wanted woman. Caught up in a fierce custody battle, she kidnapped her baby daughter and fled the US, criss-crossing three continents to evade capture. Lee finally settled on Queensland's Sunshine Coast, and got on with her life until the FBI turned up on her doorstep. Now, for the first time since being released from prison, Lee is able to tell the full story of her life as a fugitive - a secret hidden from even her own children. But that story is far from over. Lee is now campaigning to be reunited with her children in Australia. Hooked From the outside looking in, rugby league legend Matt Cooper has it all - a beautiful wife, two healthy girls, a luxurious home and a place in Australian sporting history. But until recently, Matt had a dark secret - a secret that almost cost him everything. He was hiding a severe addiction to prescription drugs. Opioid addiction doesn't discriminate, hundreds of Australians die every year, and thousands more are hopelessly hooked on strong pain killers. From superstars like actor Heath Ledger to everyday mums. Sunday Night's Alex Cullen presents this special health report. Reach for the Sky Andy Hensel was a high-flying freestyle motocross star, fearless and always up for a challenge. But six years ago, his dream run came to a tragic end. Andy took off up a ramp hurtling more than 20 metres in the air, and missed the landing. He crashed the bike, broke his back and crushed his spinal cord. The accident left him a paraplegic. Enough, you'd think, to ground him forever. Not Andy. Sunday Night is there as he bravely attempts to fly again.
Malcolm Turnbull 
Laura Tingle discusses the latest from Canberra, including electricity prices and the possibility of the government funding a new coal-fired power station.
Croatia 
Millions of fans will watch the World Cup decider this weekend - a David and Goliath contest between a football powerhouse and a tiny country that's never made the final before. After beating England, Croatia will take on the tournament favourites France in the final.
Mortgage Choice 
One of Australia's biggest publicly listed brokers, Mortgage Choice, has an overhaul of its remuneration model. It says it will now pay franchisees more and reduce the volatility of their income. It comes after complaints from franchisees, who said Mortgage Choice's business model was leaving some brokers in financial ruin.
Trump set to meet NATO leaders as part of European visit
US President starts the beginning of what promises to be stormy week-long visit to Europe with a NATO meeting in Belgium. Rachael Rizzo of the Centre for a New American Security discusses what may happen.
Miss America beauty pageant 
For the first time in nearly 100 years, when young women vying for the title of Miss America appear on stage in Atlantic City this September it won't be in swimsuits. In the #MeToo era, the historic pageant is promising Miss America 2.0 will focus on contestants talents, intelligence and ideas - not their outward appearance. But not everyone is happy to say bye-bye to the bikinis.

7.30: Malcolm Turnbull/Croatia/Mortgage Choice/Trump Meets NATO Leaders/Miss America Beauty Pageant

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
30:36
Malcolm Turnbull Laura Tingle discusses the latest from Canberra, including electricity prices and the possibility of the government funding a new coal-fired power station. Croatia Millions of fans will watch the World Cup decider this weekend - a David and Goliath contest between a football powerhouse and a tiny country that's never made the final before. After beating England, Croatia will take on the tournament favourites France in the final. Mortgage Choice One of Australia's biggest publicly listed brokers, Mortgage Choice, has an overhaul of its remuneration model. It says it will now pay franchisees more and reduce the volatility of their income. It comes after complaints from franchisees, who said Mortgage Choice's business model was leaving some brokers in financial ruin. Trump set to meet NATO leaders as part of European visit US President starts the beginning of what promises to be stormy week-long visit to Europe with a NATO meeting in Belgium. Rachael Rizzo of the Centre for a New American Security discusses what may happen. Miss America beauty pageant For the first time in nearly 100 years, when young women vying for the title of Miss America appear on stage in Atlantic City this September it won't be in swimsuits. In the #MeToo era, the historic pageant is promising Miss America 2.0 will focus on contestants talents, intelligence and ideas - not their outward appearance. But not everyone is happy to say bye-bye to the bikinis.
Fortnite Phenomenon 
If you have kids, chances are they're among the 125 million people playing the popular video game Fortnite. And it's driving some parents and teachers crazy. They are flocking to professional help to pry their kids away but for others the game is just like any other hobby - it's all about balance.
Bernard Collaery
Unprecedented legal action against two men for allegedly breaching the intelligence services act has sparked fierce debate about the balance between national security and the public's right to know.
Rod Sims 
Australia's competition watchdog has laid out a sweeping plan to bring those bills down and says it could save households up to $400 a year. Rod Sims outlines what the ACCC has in mind.
Rural Mental Health
A western Victorian farmer has come up with a bald plan to give his industry national exposure. He's convincing an increasing number of his colleagues to take their kit off. It's part of a cheeky new campaign called "The Naked Farmer", which aims to raise awareness of - and funding for - mental health.
Dept. of Veterans' Affairs
Last month 7.30 aired a story about the extraordinary lengths the Department of Veterans' Affairs went to, to thwart a compensation claim: secretly changing its own policy in order to stop a claim by a former elite paratrooper who had badly injured his back. We've now learnt the head of the Veterans' Affairs department has requested a meeting with Mr Rollins in order to issue a personal apology. The ministers for Defence and Veterans Affairs have also ordered a departmental review into the matter.

7.30: Fortnite Phenomenon/ Bernard Collaery/Rod Sims/Rural Mental Health/Dept. of Veteran Affairs

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
31:31
Fortnite Phenomenon If you have kids, chances are they're among the 125 million people playing the popular video game Fortnite. And it's driving some parents and teachers crazy. They are flocking to professional help to pry their kids away but for others the game is just like any other hobby - it's all about balance. Bernard Collaery Unprecedented legal action against two men for allegedly breaching the intelligence services act has sparked fierce debate about the balance between national security and the public's right to know. Rod Sims Australia's competition watchdog has laid out a sweeping plan to bring those bills down and says it could save households up to $400 a year. Rod Sims outlines what the ACCC has in mind. Rural Mental Health A western Victorian farmer has come up with a bald plan to give his industry national exposure. He's convincing an increasing number of his colleagues to take their kit off. It's part of a cheeky new campaign called "The Naked Farmer", which aims to raise awareness of - and funding for - mental health. Dept. of Veterans' Affairs Last month 7.30 aired a story about the extraordinary lengths the Department of Veterans' Affairs went to, to thwart a compensation claim: secretly changing its own policy in order to stop a claim by a former elite paratrooper who had badly injured his back. We've now learnt the head of the Veterans' Affairs department has requested a meeting with Mr Rollins in order to issue a personal apology. The ministers for Defence and Veterans Affairs have also ordered a departmental review into the matter.
Jenny Brockie takes a look at why people are suffering from more food insecurities.
Once or twice a week, Sunita and her husband go without a meal so their two children can have something to eat. Other times, they turn to Weet-Bix for breakfast, lunch and dinner.
A growing number of Australians are going hungry. CEO of Foodbank, Australia’s largest hunger relief organisation, Brianna Casey says 3.6 million Australians have been food insecure in the last 12 months – including one in five children.
Renee and Grant’s lives changed overnight when Grant had an accident at work. The pair suddenly found themselves struggling to afford food for their family of six, while trying to keep up with mortgage repayments and other bills. Even with the help of a community food program that provides low cost groceries, they both say they still skip meals each week so their children can eat.

Aunty Lena, a member of the Stolen Generations, has three adult children, four grandchildren and three great-grandchildren living under her roof. With only her aged pension for income, she struggles to feed her large family after paying the rent and electricity, but she’s resolved to keeping her household together.
She mostly chooses the food her grandchildren want to eat from a local food relief program, and says meat is a luxury.
Charities and food rescue organisations have stepped up to help provide nutritious food and hot meals for those who might otherwise go without. And thousands of schools across the country are now running breakfast clubs to make sure their students have a healthy meal to start the school day.
But Brianna admits food relief programs are “a bandaid over a gaping wound,” and that while sourcing food for those in need is crucial, it doesn’t get to the root cause of food insecurity.
This week, Insight asks – who’s going hungry in Australia, and why?

Insight: Hungry

News and current affairs, Intercultural understanding

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs, Intercultural understanding
52:48
Jenny Brockie takes a look at why people are suffering from more food insecurities. Once or twice a week, Sunita and her husband go without a meal so their two children can have something to eat. Other times, they turn to Weet-Bix for breakfast, lunch and dinner. A growing number of Australians are going hungry. CEO of Foodbank, Australia’s largest hunger relief organisation, Brianna Casey says 3.6 million Australians have been food insecure in the last 12 months – including one in five children. Renee and Grant’s lives changed overnight when Grant had an accident at work. The pair suddenly found themselves struggling to afford food for their family of six, while trying to keep up with mortgage repayments and other bills. Even with the help of a community food program that provides low cost groceries, they both say they still skip meals each week so their children can eat. Aunty Lena, a member of the Stolen Generations, has three adult children, four grandchildren and three great-grandchildren living under her roof. With only her aged pension for income, she struggles to feed her large family after paying the rent and electricity, but she’s resolved to keeping her household together. She mostly chooses the food her grandchildren want to eat from a local food relief program, and says meat is a luxury. Charities and food rescue organisations have stepped up to help provide nutritious food and hot meals for those who might otherwise go without. And thousands of schools across the country are now running breakfast clubs to make sure their students have a healthy meal to start the school day. But Brianna admits food relief programs are “a bandaid over a gaping wound,” and that while sourcing food for those in need is crucial, it doesn’t get to the root cause of food insecurity. This week, Insight asks – who’s going hungry in Australia, and why?
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