Myth Hunters

Myth Hunters

The Lost Sword of the Samurai
Season 1  |  Episode 6  |  SBS  |  April 30, 2016

The Honjo Masamune is perhaps the greatest Japanese sword ever made. A Japanese National Treasure, it is certainly the most famous, because no-one knows where it is. Forged in the 13th century by the great sword smith Masamune it became the ceremonial sword of the ruling Tokugawa shoguns for 250 years. After their fall from power in 1868 the great sword continued to be passed down the generations into the twentieth century, but in the aftermath of the Second World War it disappeared. What could have happened to it? (From the UK) (Documentary) (Rpt) PG(V)

The Honjo Masamune is perhaps the greatest Japanese sword ever made. A Japanese National Treasure, it is certainly the most famous, because no-one knows where it is. Forged in the 13th century by the great sword smith Masamune it became the ceremonial sword of the ruling Tokugawa shoguns for 250 years. After their fall from power in 1868 the great sword continued to be passed down the generations into the twentieth century, but in the aftermath of the Second World War it disappeared. What could have happened to it? (From the UK) (Documentary) (Rpt) PG(V)

In the early nineteenth century, stories emerged of mysterious ruins that lay buried and forgotten, deep inside the jungles of Central America. But a lost civilisation in this region was thought to be impossible in the 1800s. Everyone knew that the continent had only ever been peopled by savages, and they couldn't have created such sophisticated structures. But then a young American lawyer named John Lloyd Stephens, and a British artist, Frederick Catherwood, went to seek out these ruins for themselves. They travelled hundreds of miles through the jungles of Mexico, Guatemala, and Honduras and eventually uncovered forty four buried and forgotten cities. All with a common architectural style that confirmed that there was once a single, vast civilisation that had existed in a place where nobody believed there could be one. But for all their extraordinary revelations, there was still one question they could not answer. Who were the people who built this place? Stephens believed that their history was engraved on their monuments and that one day when someone could read them, they would be able to understand the history of those who had lived there. Over the next one hundred and seventy years, archaeologist's inspired by Stephens and Catherwood's explorations, managed to read the writings and the symbols, and a picture emerged of the rise and fall of one of the world's greatest civilisations, the Maya. With their astonishing discoveries, the two amateur explorers overturned everything we thought we knew about the history of the New World.

Myth Hunters: The Men Who Found The Maya

Media arts, History, Critical thinking

Years 9-10, 11-12 Media arts, History, Critical thinking
50:19
In the early nineteenth century, stories emerged of mysterious ruins that lay buried and forgotten, deep inside the jungles of Central America. But a lost civilisation in this region was thought to be impossible in the 1800s. Everyone knew that the continent had only ever been peopled by savages, and they couldn't have created such sophisticated structures. But then a young American lawyer named John Lloyd Stephens, and a British artist, Frederick Catherwood, went to seek out these ruins for themselves. They travelled hundreds of miles through the jungles of Mexico, Guatemala, and Honduras and eventually uncovered forty four buried and forgotten cities. All with a common architectural style that confirmed that there was once a single, vast civilisation that had existed in a place where nobody believed there could be one. But for all their extraordinary revelations, there was still one question they could not answer. Who were the people who built this place? Stephens believed that their history was engraved on their monuments and that one day when someone could read them, they would be able to understand the history of those who had lived there. Over the next one hundred and seventy years, archaeologist's inspired by Stephens and Catherwood's explorations, managed to read the writings and the symbols, and a picture emerged of the rise and fall of one of the world's greatest civilisations, the Maya. With their astonishing discoveries, the two amateur explorers overturned everything we thought we knew about the history of the New World.
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