Lateline

Lateline

November 27, 2017
ABC  |  November 27, 2017
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Labor Predicted To Form Majority Government After Queensland Election
The federal government is absorbing the impact of the election result in Queensland, where there was an 8 percent swing against the Liberal National Party. Labor is likely to form a majority government. Political correspondent Matt Wordsworth reports.

Canavan: Royal Commission On Banking 'Not The Answer'
Under sustained pressure from the Nationals, the federal government looks increasingly likely to drop its opposition to a banking royal commission. Barnaby Joyce has told the Guardian his party is "only too willing" to discuss the issue. Emma Alberici spoke with Queensland LNP senator and minister for resources and northern Australia, Matt Canavan.

Is This Israel's 'Most Hated' Man?
Author and commentator Gideon Levy has been called both "the most hated man in Israel" and "the most heroic". While he describes himself as a "patriotic Israeli", he's highly critical of what he calls his country's "moral blindness" to its acts of war and occupation. Emma Alberici spoke to Gideon Levy ahead of his talk at the University of Sydney this week.

Labor Predicted To Form Majority Government After Queensland Election
The federal government is absorbing the impact of the election result in Queensland, where there was an 8 percent swing against the Liberal National Party. Labor is likely to form a majority government. Political correspondent Matt Wordsworth reports.

Canavan: Royal Commission On Banking 'Not The Answer'
Under sustained pressure from the Nationals, the federal government looks increasingly likely to drop its opposition to a banking royal commission. Barnaby Joyce has told the Guardian his party is "only too willing" to discuss the issue. Emma Alberici spoke with Queensland LNP senator and minister for resources and northern Australia, Matt Canavan.

Is This Israel's 'Most Hated' Man?
Author and commentator Gideon Levy has been called both "the most hated man in Israel" and "the most heroic". While he describes himself as a "patriotic Israeli", he's highly critical of what he calls his country's "moral blindness" to its acts of war and occupation. Emma Alberici spoke to Gideon Levy ahead of his talk at the University of Sydney this week.

Wordsworth On Ongoing Citizenship Saga And 'Maggot' Incident
Emma Alberici speaks to political correspondent Matt Wordsworth about the ongoing citizenship saga and why his interview with Labor MP Justine Keay has gone viral.

Mathias Cormann Responds To Citizenship Furore
Emma Alberici speaks to finance minister Mathias Cormann about the ongoing citizenship saga and the same-sex marriage bill.

Grieving Father Seeks Solution To Rural Australia's Suicide Problem
Every year 3000 people die by suicide in Australia. It's a staggering number, and a significant proportion of those deaths are not in the big cities. For most people living in rural and regional communities, the first place they will turn after attempting suicide or having suicidal thoughts is the emergency department. In some cases, those who present to hospitals are being turned away, with deadly consequences. Naomi Selvaratnam produced this report, and a warning, this story contains themes that may be distressing to some viewers.

Farewell Lateline: Our Correspondents Reflect On Their Most Memorable Moments
Over the past 28 years Lateline has distinguished itself as the home of breaking news from overseas. Our correspondents have braved riots, floods, fires and earthquakes to bring you some of the biggest events in modern history. As we prepare to farewell Lateline, the current crop of the ABC's international reporters look back on some of their most memorable moments.

Lateline: December 6, 2017

News and current affairs

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs
29:29
Wordsworth On Ongoing Citizenship Saga And 'Maggot' Incident Emma Alberici speaks to political correspondent Matt Wordsworth about the ongoing citizenship saga and why his interview with Labor MP Justine Keay has gone viral. Mathias Cormann Responds To Citizenship Furore Emma Alberici speaks to finance minister Mathias Cormann about the ongoing citizenship saga and the same-sex marriage bill. Grieving Father Seeks Solution To Rural Australia's Suicide Problem Every year 3000 people die by suicide in Australia. It's a staggering number, and a significant proportion of those deaths are not in the big cities. For most people living in rural and regional communities, the first place they will turn after attempting suicide or having suicidal thoughts is the emergency department. In some cases, those who present to hospitals are being turned away, with deadly consequences. Naomi Selvaratnam produced this report, and a warning, this story contains themes that may be distressing to some viewers. Farewell Lateline: Our Correspondents Reflect On Their Most Memorable Moments Over the past 28 years Lateline has distinguished itself as the home of breaking news from overseas. Our correspondents have braved riots, floods, fires and earthquakes to bring you some of the biggest events in modern history. As we prepare to farewell Lateline, the current crop of the ABC's international reporters look back on some of their most memorable moments.
Celebrations As Australia Votes To Legalise Same-sex Marriage
Australians have sent a firm message to Parliament, voting overwhelmingly in favour of allowing same-sex couples to marry. John Stewart and Kathleen Calderwood followed campaigners from both sides in the final weeks before today's result.

Same-sex Marriage Bill Introduced In Parliament, With Senators To Debate Religious Exemptions
In the political arena, the battle lines are being drawn. Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull is pledging to legalise same-sex marriage by the end of the year, amid intense pressure from some in his own ranks to ensure religious freedoms are protected. Michael Vincent reports.

Panel: Same-sex Marriage And Religious Freedom
There's been much discussion during the campaign about the issue of religious freedom and what a yes vote and any legislation that followed might mean. Matt Wordsworth speaks to Jesuit priest Father Frank Brennan, Islamic Council of Queensland spokesman Ali Kadri and Anglican bishop and chair of the Coalition for Marriage, Michael Stead, about what same-sex marriage legiglation might mean for religious freedom.

Senator Says Same-sex Marriage Laws Will Take Concerns Of 'No' Voters Into Account
Matt Wordsworth speaks to Liberal senator for Western Australia, Dean Smith, who introduced his bill to legalise same-sex marriage in Parliament today, about anticipated debates on the extent of protections for religious leaders.

Lateline: November 15, 2017

News and current affairs

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs
29:36
Celebrations As Australia Votes To Legalise Same-sex Marriage Australians have sent a firm message to Parliament, voting overwhelmingly in favour of allowing same-sex couples to marry. John Stewart and Kathleen Calderwood followed campaigners from both sides in the final weeks before today's result. Same-sex Marriage Bill Introduced In Parliament, With Senators To Debate Religious Exemptions In the political arena, the battle lines are being drawn. Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull is pledging to legalise same-sex marriage by the end of the year, amid intense pressure from some in his own ranks to ensure religious freedoms are protected. Michael Vincent reports. Panel: Same-sex Marriage And Religious Freedom There's been much discussion during the campaign about the issue of religious freedom and what a yes vote and any legislation that followed might mean. Matt Wordsworth speaks to Jesuit priest Father Frank Brennan, Islamic Council of Queensland spokesman Ali Kadri and Anglican bishop and chair of the Coalition for Marriage, Michael Stead, about what same-sex marriage legiglation might mean for religious freedom. Senator Says Same-sex Marriage Laws Will Take Concerns Of 'No' Voters Into Account Matt Wordsworth speaks to Liberal senator for Western Australia, Dean Smith, who introduced his bill to legalise same-sex marriage in Parliament today, about anticipated debates on the extent of protections for religious leaders.
The Beyonce Of Opera: De Niese Back Home For Australian Debut
Young Talent Time was the variety TV show that introduced Australian audiences to names such as Tina Arena, Dannii Minogue and Debra Byrne. At just nine years old, Danielle de Niese also got her first big break as the Young Talent Time's youngest-ever winner. Fast-forward to today and she's an internationally acclaimed soprano, gracing stages all over the world. The singer is making her local operatic debut in Opera Australia's production of The Merry Widow which opens next week in her hometown of Melbourne. Kyle Taylor has more.

School Of The Future: What Can Kids Learn From Robots?
There are calls tonight for a major rethink of the way teachers teach and the way children learn to better prepare them for the impacts of artificial intelligence and other advances in technology. We're taking you inside one primary school that's embracing technology in the classroom revealing the lessons kids can learn from robots and it turns out they can teach the machines a thing or two as well. Kyle Taylor produced this report.

NSW Education: Schools Must Prepare Kids For Intelligent Machines
Mark Scott heads up the New South Wales Department of Education. At a schools symposium today in Sydney, he delivered a speech detailing his vision for the future of education in a world dominated by intelligent machines. He also expressed alarm about the low participation rate of girls in maths and science subjects and talked about the urgent task of revamping a crowded curriculum that might benefit from a paring back that sees fewer subjects taught in greater depth.

Lateline: November 9, 2017

News and current affairs

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs
29:06
The Beyonce Of Opera: De Niese Back Home For Australian Debut Young Talent Time was the variety TV show that introduced Australian audiences to names such as Tina Arena, Dannii Minogue and Debra Byrne. At just nine years old, Danielle de Niese also got her first big break as the Young Talent Time's youngest-ever winner. Fast-forward to today and she's an internationally acclaimed soprano, gracing stages all over the world. The singer is making her local operatic debut in Opera Australia's production of The Merry Widow which opens next week in her hometown of Melbourne. Kyle Taylor has more. School Of The Future: What Can Kids Learn From Robots? There are calls tonight for a major rethink of the way teachers teach and the way children learn to better prepare them for the impacts of artificial intelligence and other advances in technology. We're taking you inside one primary school that's embracing technology in the classroom revealing the lessons kids can learn from robots and it turns out they can teach the machines a thing or two as well. Kyle Taylor produced this report. NSW Education: Schools Must Prepare Kids For Intelligent Machines Mark Scott heads up the New South Wales Department of Education. At a schools symposium today in Sydney, he delivered a speech detailing his vision for the future of education in a world dominated by intelligent machines. He also expressed alarm about the low participation rate of girls in maths and science subjects and talked about the urgent task of revamping a crowded curriculum that might benefit from a paring back that sees fewer subjects taught in greater depth.
Jenny Brockie takes a look at chronic fatigue syndrome, what symptoms it has, and how people with the condition have managed it.
At 20 years old, Adele Clydesdale had just climbed Mount Kilimanjaro; she was starting her second year of university and playing in the Victorian Netball League.
So when she got glandular fever, she didn’t think much of it. She knew plenty of people who’d had it in high school and they always recovered quickly.
But even when tests results revealed the glandular fever was out of her system, Adele was still unwell and her symptoms were getting worse. She was increasingly fatigued, couldn’t string sentences together and had extreme body pain.
At six months, it was confirmed Adele had chronic fatigue syndrome, a diagnosis she found quite confronting.
Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is estimated to affect between 0.2-2 per cent of the population in Australia yet very little is known about this condition.
Otherwise known as Myalgic Encephalomyelitis or ME, it is an illness characterised by profound fatigue, not relieved by sleep or rest and worsened with activity.
Patients will commonly experience muscle and joint pain, impaired memory and concentration and gastrointestinal disorders. However, the most defining indicator of CFS is Post Exertional Malaise (PEM) - when a certain level of cognitive or physical exertion will exacerbate a patient’s symptoms.
There are currently no proven treatments for CFS which means many are left without answers. Ketra Wooding has been unwell for eight years and with such severe symptoms, she has been living in a nursing home for five of those years.

Insight: Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

News and current affairs, Intercultural understanding

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs, Intercultural understanding
51:56
Jenny Brockie takes a look at chronic fatigue syndrome, what symptoms it has, and how people with the condition have managed it. At 20 years old, Adele Clydesdale had just climbed Mount Kilimanjaro; she was starting her second year of university and playing in the Victorian Netball League. So when she got glandular fever, she didn’t think much of it. She knew plenty of people who’d had it in high school and they always recovered quickly. But even when tests results revealed the glandular fever was out of her system, Adele was still unwell and her symptoms were getting worse. She was increasingly fatigued, couldn’t string sentences together and had extreme body pain. At six months, it was confirmed Adele had chronic fatigue syndrome, a diagnosis she found quite confronting. Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is estimated to affect between 0.2-2 per cent of the population in Australia yet very little is known about this condition. Otherwise known as Myalgic Encephalomyelitis or ME, it is an illness characterised by profound fatigue, not relieved by sleep or rest and worsened with activity. Patients will commonly experience muscle and joint pain, impaired memory and concentration and gastrointestinal disorders. However, the most defining indicator of CFS is Post Exertional Malaise (PEM) - when a certain level of cognitive or physical exertion will exacerbate a patient’s symptoms. There are currently no proven treatments for CFS which means many are left without answers. Ketra Wooding has been unwell for eight years and with such severe symptoms, she has been living in a nursing home for five of those years.
The man who broke Watergate talks about Donald Trump
Donald Trump may have popularised the term 'fake news', but the wild nature of his presidency has also spawned an extraordinary series of insider accounts of his chaotic White House. The latest and most substantial of these is 'Fear' by veteran Washington reporter Bob Woodward.
Young women and injuries
The introduction of an AFL women's competition, the rise of the Matildas, and the increasing popularity of women's cricket all reflect a huge increase in the popularity of women's team sport. But with this surge has come a significant increase in serious knee injuries. Women are up to ten times more likely to rupture their anterior cruciate ligament than men, and Australia has the highest rate of knee reconstructions in the world.
Energy distributors push for a cap on solar power
More than six solar panels are installed across Australia every minute of every day as people try to tackle rising power prices. But the industry that owns Australia's poles and wires says all that power from the sun is a problem and it could destabilise the electricity grid. The solar industry disagrees, and it's preparing for a fight with the power networks.
Asian elephants under threat 
The Asian elephant is one of the world's most majestic animals. But now these gentle giants face a threat that could wipe them out completely … poachers who want their skin.

7.30: October 15, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
29:08
The man who broke Watergate talks about Donald Trump Donald Trump may have popularised the term 'fake news', but the wild nature of his presidency has also spawned an extraordinary series of insider accounts of his chaotic White House. The latest and most substantial of these is 'Fear' by veteran Washington reporter Bob Woodward. Young women and injuries The introduction of an AFL women's competition, the rise of the Matildas, and the increasing popularity of women's cricket all reflect a huge increase in the popularity of women's team sport. But with this surge has come a significant increase in serious knee injuries. Women are up to ten times more likely to rupture their anterior cruciate ligament than men, and Australia has the highest rate of knee reconstructions in the world. Energy distributors push for a cap on solar power More than six solar panels are installed across Australia every minute of every day as people try to tackle rising power prices. But the industry that owns Australia's poles and wires says all that power from the sun is a problem and it could destabilise the electricity grid. The solar industry disagrees, and it's preparing for a fight with the power networks. Asian elephants under threat The Asian elephant is one of the world's most majestic animals. But now these gentle giants face a threat that could wipe them out completely … poachers who want their skin.
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