Lateline

Lateline

November 21, 2017
ABC  |  November 21, 2017
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Guilty Verdict Expected For Ratko Mladic
Matt Wordsworth speaks with NSW magistrate Graham Blewitt, the former deputy chief prosecutor of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia at The Hague.

How Can West Win Cyberwar Against IS?
Coalition forces in Syria and Iraq are re-taking significant swathes of land from Islamic State, meaning its self-declared caliphate is almost fully eroded. But a former senior adviser to the US State Department is warning of a fresh battle - a so-called "cyber jihad", as Michael Vincent reports.

Haroon Ullah Calls For Unified Approach To Fight Cyberwar Against IS
Matt Wordsworth speaks to former senior adviser to the US State Department and author of Digital World War, Haroon Ullah, about why western governments need a new Manhattan Project to take on the terrorist group online.

Guilty Verdict Expected For Ratko Mladic
Matt Wordsworth speaks with NSW magistrate Graham Blewitt, the former deputy chief prosecutor of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia at The Hague.

How Can West Win Cyberwar Against IS?
Coalition forces in Syria and Iraq are re-taking significant swathes of land from Islamic State, meaning its self-declared caliphate is almost fully eroded. But a former senior adviser to the US State Department is warning of a fresh battle - a so-called "cyber jihad", as Michael Vincent reports.

Haroon Ullah Calls For Unified Approach To Fight Cyberwar Against IS
Matt Wordsworth speaks to former senior adviser to the US State Department and author of Digital World War, Haroon Ullah, about why western governments need a new Manhattan Project to take on the terrorist group online.

Wordsworth On Ongoing Citizenship Saga And 'Maggot' Incident
Emma Alberici speaks to political correspondent Matt Wordsworth about the ongoing citizenship saga and why his interview with Labor MP Justine Keay has gone viral.

Mathias Cormann Responds To Citizenship Furore
Emma Alberici speaks to finance minister Mathias Cormann about the ongoing citizenship saga and the same-sex marriage bill.

Grieving Father Seeks Solution To Rural Australia's Suicide Problem
Every year 3000 people die by suicide in Australia. It's a staggering number, and a significant proportion of those deaths are not in the big cities. For most people living in rural and regional communities, the first place they will turn after attempting suicide or having suicidal thoughts is the emergency department. In some cases, those who present to hospitals are being turned away, with deadly consequences. Naomi Selvaratnam produced this report, and a warning, this story contains themes that may be distressing to some viewers.

Farewell Lateline: Our Correspondents Reflect On Their Most Memorable Moments
Over the past 28 years Lateline has distinguished itself as the home of breaking news from overseas. Our correspondents have braved riots, floods, fires and earthquakes to bring you some of the biggest events in modern history. As we prepare to farewell Lateline, the current crop of the ABC's international reporters look back on some of their most memorable moments.

Lateline: December 6, 2017

News and current affairs

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs
29:29
Wordsworth On Ongoing Citizenship Saga And 'Maggot' Incident Emma Alberici speaks to political correspondent Matt Wordsworth about the ongoing citizenship saga and why his interview with Labor MP Justine Keay has gone viral. Mathias Cormann Responds To Citizenship Furore Emma Alberici speaks to finance minister Mathias Cormann about the ongoing citizenship saga and the same-sex marriage bill. Grieving Father Seeks Solution To Rural Australia's Suicide Problem Every year 3000 people die by suicide in Australia. It's a staggering number, and a significant proportion of those deaths are not in the big cities. For most people living in rural and regional communities, the first place they will turn after attempting suicide or having suicidal thoughts is the emergency department. In some cases, those who present to hospitals are being turned away, with deadly consequences. Naomi Selvaratnam produced this report, and a warning, this story contains themes that may be distressing to some viewers. Farewell Lateline: Our Correspondents Reflect On Their Most Memorable Moments Over the past 28 years Lateline has distinguished itself as the home of breaking news from overseas. Our correspondents have braved riots, floods, fires and earthquakes to bring you some of the biggest events in modern history. As we prepare to farewell Lateline, the current crop of the ABC's international reporters look back on some of their most memorable moments.
Celebrations As Australia Votes To Legalise Same-sex Marriage
Australians have sent a firm message to Parliament, voting overwhelmingly in favour of allowing same-sex couples to marry. John Stewart and Kathleen Calderwood followed campaigners from both sides in the final weeks before today's result.

Same-sex Marriage Bill Introduced In Parliament, With Senators To Debate Religious Exemptions
In the political arena, the battle lines are being drawn. Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull is pledging to legalise same-sex marriage by the end of the year, amid intense pressure from some in his own ranks to ensure religious freedoms are protected. Michael Vincent reports.

Panel: Same-sex Marriage And Religious Freedom
There's been much discussion during the campaign about the issue of religious freedom and what a yes vote and any legislation that followed might mean. Matt Wordsworth speaks to Jesuit priest Father Frank Brennan, Islamic Council of Queensland spokesman Ali Kadri and Anglican bishop and chair of the Coalition for Marriage, Michael Stead, about what same-sex marriage legiglation might mean for religious freedom.

Senator Says Same-sex Marriage Laws Will Take Concerns Of 'No' Voters Into Account
Matt Wordsworth speaks to Liberal senator for Western Australia, Dean Smith, who introduced his bill to legalise same-sex marriage in Parliament today, about anticipated debates on the extent of protections for religious leaders.

Lateline: November 15, 2017

News and current affairs

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs
29:36
Celebrations As Australia Votes To Legalise Same-sex Marriage Australians have sent a firm message to Parliament, voting overwhelmingly in favour of allowing same-sex couples to marry. John Stewart and Kathleen Calderwood followed campaigners from both sides in the final weeks before today's result. Same-sex Marriage Bill Introduced In Parliament, With Senators To Debate Religious Exemptions In the political arena, the battle lines are being drawn. Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull is pledging to legalise same-sex marriage by the end of the year, amid intense pressure from some in his own ranks to ensure religious freedoms are protected. Michael Vincent reports. Panel: Same-sex Marriage And Religious Freedom There's been much discussion during the campaign about the issue of religious freedom and what a yes vote and any legislation that followed might mean. Matt Wordsworth speaks to Jesuit priest Father Frank Brennan, Islamic Council of Queensland spokesman Ali Kadri and Anglican bishop and chair of the Coalition for Marriage, Michael Stead, about what same-sex marriage legiglation might mean for religious freedom. Senator Says Same-sex Marriage Laws Will Take Concerns Of 'No' Voters Into Account Matt Wordsworth speaks to Liberal senator for Western Australia, Dean Smith, who introduced his bill to legalise same-sex marriage in Parliament today, about anticipated debates on the extent of protections for religious leaders.
The Beyonce Of Opera: De Niese Back Home For Australian Debut
Young Talent Time was the variety TV show that introduced Australian audiences to names such as Tina Arena, Dannii Minogue and Debra Byrne. At just nine years old, Danielle de Niese also got her first big break as the Young Talent Time's youngest-ever winner. Fast-forward to today and she's an internationally acclaimed soprano, gracing stages all over the world. The singer is making her local operatic debut in Opera Australia's production of The Merry Widow which opens next week in her hometown of Melbourne. Kyle Taylor has more.

School Of The Future: What Can Kids Learn From Robots?
There are calls tonight for a major rethink of the way teachers teach and the way children learn to better prepare them for the impacts of artificial intelligence and other advances in technology. We're taking you inside one primary school that's embracing technology in the classroom revealing the lessons kids can learn from robots and it turns out they can teach the machines a thing or two as well. Kyle Taylor produced this report.

NSW Education: Schools Must Prepare Kids For Intelligent Machines
Mark Scott heads up the New South Wales Department of Education. At a schools symposium today in Sydney, he delivered a speech detailing his vision for the future of education in a world dominated by intelligent machines. He also expressed alarm about the low participation rate of girls in maths and science subjects and talked about the urgent task of revamping a crowded curriculum that might benefit from a paring back that sees fewer subjects taught in greater depth.

Lateline: November 9, 2017

News and current affairs

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs
29:06
The Beyonce Of Opera: De Niese Back Home For Australian Debut Young Talent Time was the variety TV show that introduced Australian audiences to names such as Tina Arena, Dannii Minogue and Debra Byrne. At just nine years old, Danielle de Niese also got her first big break as the Young Talent Time's youngest-ever winner. Fast-forward to today and she's an internationally acclaimed soprano, gracing stages all over the world. The singer is making her local operatic debut in Opera Australia's production of The Merry Widow which opens next week in her hometown of Melbourne. Kyle Taylor has more. School Of The Future: What Can Kids Learn From Robots? There are calls tonight for a major rethink of the way teachers teach and the way children learn to better prepare them for the impacts of artificial intelligence and other advances in technology. We're taking you inside one primary school that's embracing technology in the classroom revealing the lessons kids can learn from robots and it turns out they can teach the machines a thing or two as well. Kyle Taylor produced this report. NSW Education: Schools Must Prepare Kids For Intelligent Machines Mark Scott heads up the New South Wales Department of Education. At a schools symposium today in Sydney, he delivered a speech detailing his vision for the future of education in a world dominated by intelligent machines. He also expressed alarm about the low participation rate of girls in maths and science subjects and talked about the urgent task of revamping a crowded curriculum that might benefit from a paring back that sees fewer subjects taught in greater depth.
India claims a dramatic win 
Despite dogged resistance from Australia's tail, India has taken an historic early lead in the four Test series after snatching victory in the opening match by 31 runs. It's just the sixth time India has won a Test on Australian soil.
Commentator Andrew Moore takes a look at a dramatic final day.
Are we overlooking the role of the public sector in the economy?
Mariana Mazzucato is something of a rockstar in the world of global economics. She's written two best-sellers arguing that it's actually the public sector which has made the crucial investments that have transformed the world economy. In Australia for a series of public lectures, she sat down to talk with Laura Tingle.

Sanjeev Gupta unveils plans for Whyalla
It's rare to see the Prime Minister and Opposition leader at the same press conference, but both were present in South Australia today as British billionaire Sanjeev Gupta unveiled his plans for a massive new steelworks project that will revive the town of Whyalla.

Remembering the 1966 helicopter crash 
The 11th of December marks the anniversary of a tragic accident over Sydney Harbour that changed our aviation safety laws. On that day in 1966 a helicopter chartered by the ABC ran into technical problems mid flight and crashed into the Sydney CBD. Remarkably the accident was filmed by two cameras, including one capturing the haunting last moments inside the ill-fated helicopter. And a warning, this report contains images some viewers may find distressing.

What is the future of Australia's housing market?
For years it seemed that property prices would rise for ever. But not any more. We are now in what the Reserve Bank governor has called "uncharted territory", where property prices are falling in our two biggest cities, even though unemployment is stable and the economy is growing.

7.30: December 10, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
29:43
India claims a dramatic win Despite dogged resistance from Australia's tail, India has taken an historic early lead in the four Test series after snatching victory in the opening match by 31 runs. It's just the sixth time India has won a Test on Australian soil. Commentator Andrew Moore takes a look at a dramatic final day. Are we overlooking the role of the public sector in the economy? Mariana Mazzucato is something of a rockstar in the world of global economics. She's written two best-sellers arguing that it's actually the public sector which has made the crucial investments that have transformed the world economy. In Australia for a series of public lectures, she sat down to talk with Laura Tingle. Sanjeev Gupta unveils plans for Whyalla It's rare to see the Prime Minister and Opposition leader at the same press conference, but both were present in South Australia today as British billionaire Sanjeev Gupta unveiled his plans for a massive new steelworks project that will revive the town of Whyalla. Remembering the 1966 helicopter crash The 11th of December marks the anniversary of a tragic accident over Sydney Harbour that changed our aviation safety laws. On that day in 1966 a helicopter chartered by the ABC ran into technical problems mid flight and crashed into the Sydney CBD. Remarkably the accident was filmed by two cameras, including one capturing the haunting last moments inside the ill-fated helicopter. And a warning, this report contains images some viewers may find distressing. What is the future of Australia's housing market? For years it seemed that property prices would rise for ever. But not any more. We are now in what the Reserve Bank governor has called "uncharted territory", where property prices are falling in our two biggest cities, even though unemployment is stable and the economy is growing.
Major parties clash over discrimination bill
The second last day of federal parliament for the year and the level of frenzy rose considerably. Asylum seekers, energy and the economy were all being debated, but it was the issue of discrimination against gay students attending religious schools, that had the government and opposition in fiercest combat.

Ita Buttrose gives advice to her younger self
When Ita Buttrose started Cleo magazine in 1972, it was the first time a women's publication was frank about sexuality and it went on to become a huge success. That was just the beginning for a woman who's paved the way for women in journalism ever since. Now Ita Buttrose shares her wisdom in our 'advice to my younger self' series.

Chris Dawson 
Renee Simms, the niece of Lynette Dawson, talks about the arrest of Chris Murphy, who is expected to be charged with the murder of his wife 36 years ago.
 
Reverse mortgages leaving the elderly high and dry
Reverse mortgages are touted as a way to unlock equity in the family home by borrowing against the asset without needing to make repayments until the house is sold or the owner moves out or dies. But a number of banks, including Australia's biggest lender the Commonwealth Bank, are now getting out of the reverse mortgage market, in the face of criticism from the peak financial regulator, ASIC.
Closing Europe's biggest steel works
In the south of Italy, a major corruption trial is underway that is pitting a local community against Europe's biggest steelworks, the Ilva plant in Taranto. The pollution from the plant is so bad it has been blamed in official government reports for the deaths of almost 400 local residents. The former owners of the company have been accused of crimes against public safety.

7.30: December 5, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
30:36
Major parties clash over discrimination bill The second last day of federal parliament for the year and the level of frenzy rose considerably. Asylum seekers, energy and the economy were all being debated, but it was the issue of discrimination against gay students attending religious schools, that had the government and opposition in fiercest combat. Ita Buttrose gives advice to her younger self When Ita Buttrose started Cleo magazine in 1972, it was the first time a women's publication was frank about sexuality and it went on to become a huge success. That was just the beginning for a woman who's paved the way for women in journalism ever since. Now Ita Buttrose shares her wisdom in our 'advice to my younger self' series. Chris Dawson Renee Simms, the niece of Lynette Dawson, talks about the arrest of Chris Murphy, who is expected to be charged with the murder of his wife 36 years ago. Reverse mortgages leaving the elderly high and dry Reverse mortgages are touted as a way to unlock equity in the family home by borrowing against the asset without needing to make repayments until the house is sold or the owner moves out or dies. But a number of banks, including Australia's biggest lender the Commonwealth Bank, are now getting out of the reverse mortgage market, in the face of criticism from the peak financial regulator, ASIC. Closing Europe's biggest steel works In the south of Italy, a major corruption trial is underway that is pitting a local community against Europe's biggest steelworks, the Ilva plant in Taranto. The pollution from the plant is so bad it has been blamed in official government reports for the deaths of almost 400 local residents. The former owners of the company have been accused of crimes against public safety.
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