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Lateline: March 18, 2010
March 18, 2010
ABC  |  March 18, 2010

Stories include, 'Federal Chief Scientist joins Lateline', 'Man arrested twice over car-jackings', 'Merkel urges inquiry into priest's sexual abuse', 'Geothermal energy trials begin near Geelong', 'Concerns for Hu's secretive trial', 'Sparks fly in heated Question Time', 'Conroy joins Lateline'.

Stories include, 'Federal Chief Scientist joins Lateline', 'Man arrested twice over car-jackings', 'Merkel urges inquiry into priest's sexual abuse', 'Geothermal energy trials begin near Geelong', 'Concerns for Hu's secretive trial', 'Sparks fly in heated Question Time', 'Conroy joins Lateline'.

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29:22 | News and current affairs
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Lateline

December 7, 2017  |  ABC

Purpose over profit: Social Enterprises Boosting Employment Swinburne University has just released the first major study into social enterprises, which are on the rise in Australia. The report found that the industry is creating thousands of jobs and is having a big impact on the long-term unemployed. Emily Stewart has this report, produced by Kathleen Calderwood. Lower House Votes In Historic Same-Sex Marriage Legislation Australia has become the 26th nation to legislate for same-sex marriage. The fight to have their relationships recognised as equal to those of heterosexual couples has been a long one for the LGBTQI community in Australia. When Parliament held the final vote, emotions erupted. Political correspondent Matt Wordsworth reports. Penny Wong Welcomes Same-Sex Marriage Lower House Vote Emma Alberici speaks to opposition Senate leader and shadow foreign minister Penny Wong about the passage of historic same-sex marriage legislation through the House of Representatives. Politicians Reflect On 28 Years Of Lateline For the past 28 years, Lateline has interviewed many politicians from all political persuasions. Prime ministers, opposition leaders, ministers and MPs have all felt the pressure under the lights in the Lateline studio. Tonight we look back at some of the more memorable moments as we ask politicians to reflect on their memories of the show.

29:29 | News and current affairs
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Lateline

December 6, 2017  |  ABC

Wordsworth On Ongoing Citizenship Saga And 'Maggot' Incident Emma Alberici speaks to political correspondent Matt Wordsworth about the ongoing citizenship saga and why his interview with Labor MP Justine Keay has gone viral. Mathias Cormann Responds To Citizenship Furore Emma Alberici speaks to finance minister Mathias Cormann about the ongoing citizenship saga and the same-sex marriage bill. Grieving Father Seeks Solution To Rural Australia's Suicide Problem Every year 3000 people die by suicide in Australia. It's a staggering number, and a significant proportion of those deaths are not in the big cities. For most people living in rural and regional communities, the first place they will turn after attempting suicide or having suicidal thoughts is the emergency department. In some cases, those who present to hospitals are being turned away, with deadly consequences. Naomi Selvaratnam produced this report, and a warning, this story contains themes that may be distressing to some viewers. Farewell Lateline: Our Correspondents Reflect On Their Most Memorable Moments Over the past 28 years Lateline has distinguished itself as the home of breaking news from overseas. Our correspondents have braved riots, floods, fires and earthquakes to bring you some of the biggest events in modern history. As we prepare to farewell Lateline, the current crop of the ABC's international reporters look back on some of their most memorable moments.

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50:40 | News and current affairs
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60 Minutes

July 5, 2020  |  Nine

Right Hand Woman There was little Jeffrey Epstein wouldn't do to satisfy his lust for young women and girls. It included spending millions of dollars masterminding a worldwide sex-trafficking operation. Countless innocent lives were destroyed. A year ago Epstein was arrested and a month later he died in custody. Investigators though refused to let this scandal go to the grave with him. Instead they shifted their attention to his high-profile friends. One of them is the Queen's son, Prince Andrew, who continues to dodge requests from the FBI for an interview. But late this week there was a significant breakthrough in the case with the arrest of socialite Ghislaine Maxwell. She's accused of being Epstein's right-hand woman and has been charged with multiple child sex offences. As Tara Brown reports, for the first time in a long time, the victims in this wicked saga are feeling relief rather than terror. Money for Nothing Australians are generous. In a crisis we're happy to donate money or provide a helping hand to those who need it. It's a kindness that is recognised around the world and was well and truly on display in the aftermath of last summer's shocking bushfires when hundreds of millions of dollars was given to charities to help those who'd suffered. But six months on much of the money remains undistributed, which is causing bitterness in many fire-ravaged communities. Victims who lost their homes and are now struggling through winter living in caravans and tents feel like they've been forgotten. But the charities say there's a reason for the delay: that it takes time to ensure the claims are legitimate, especially when there are so many people accused of wanting money for nothing. In a special investigation for 60 Minutes, Tom Steinfort confronts those allegedly cashing in our generosity.

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