Lateline

Lateline

July 27, 2017
ABC  |  July 27, 2017
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Confusion After Trump Transgender Ban
Officials in Washington are scrambling to catch up with US President Donald Trump's latest policy turn. In a surprise move, the president has announced transgender people will no longer be allowed to serve in the military. The development comes in the middle of another chaotic week at the White House. Michael Vincent reports.

Interview: Michael Warren, The Weekly Standard
Jeremy Fernandez speaks to senior writer at The Weekly Standard, Michael Warren, about the US president's decision to ban transgender people from serving in the military, as well as the other troubles Donald Trump is facing, including his attempts to overturn Obamacare, and his continued undermining of his own attorney-general.

Interview: Tom Iggulden, Political Correspondent
Jeremy Fernandez speaks to political correspondent Tom Iggulden about claims One Nation Senator Malcolm Roberts holds dual citizenship.

University Opens Doors To Skateboarding Scholars
Skateboarding is increasingly being recognised as a professional sport and will be an official event at the 2020 Tokyo Olympic Games. Now one Australian university has awarded skateboarding scholarships to two of Australia's best young prospects for the games. One of them is 20-year-old Mikey Mendoza. Naomi Selvaratnam produced this report.

Confusion After Trump Transgender Ban
Officials in Washington are scrambling to catch up with US President Donald Trump's latest policy turn. In a surprise move, the president has announced transgender people will no longer be allowed to serve in the military. The development comes in the middle of another chaotic week at the White House. Michael Vincent reports.

Interview: Michael Warren, The Weekly Standard
Jeremy Fernandez speaks to senior writer at The Weekly Standard, Michael Warren, about the US president's decision to ban transgender people from serving in the military, as well as the other troubles Donald Trump is facing, including his attempts to overturn Obamacare, and his continued undermining of his own attorney-general.

Interview: Tom Iggulden, Political Correspondent
Jeremy Fernandez speaks to political correspondent Tom Iggulden about claims One Nation Senator Malcolm Roberts holds dual citizenship.

University Opens Doors To Skateboarding Scholars
Skateboarding is increasingly being recognised as a professional sport and will be an official event at the 2020 Tokyo Olympic Games. Now one Australian university has awarded skateboarding scholarships to two of Australia's best young prospects for the games. One of them is 20-year-old Mikey Mendoza. Naomi Selvaratnam produced this report.

Wordsworth On Ongoing Citizenship Saga And 'Maggot' Incident
Emma Alberici speaks to political correspondent Matt Wordsworth about the ongoing citizenship saga and why his interview with Labor MP Justine Keay has gone viral.

Mathias Cormann Responds To Citizenship Furore
Emma Alberici speaks to finance minister Mathias Cormann about the ongoing citizenship saga and the same-sex marriage bill.

Grieving Father Seeks Solution To Rural Australia's Suicide Problem
Every year 3000 people die by suicide in Australia. It's a staggering number, and a significant proportion of those deaths are not in the big cities. For most people living in rural and regional communities, the first place they will turn after attempting suicide or having suicidal thoughts is the emergency department. In some cases, those who present to hospitals are being turned away, with deadly consequences. Naomi Selvaratnam produced this report, and a warning, this story contains themes that may be distressing to some viewers.

Farewell Lateline: Our Correspondents Reflect On Their Most Memorable Moments
Over the past 28 years Lateline has distinguished itself as the home of breaking news from overseas. Our correspondents have braved riots, floods, fires and earthquakes to bring you some of the biggest events in modern history. As we prepare to farewell Lateline, the current crop of the ABC's international reporters look back on some of their most memorable moments.

Lateline: December 6, 2017

News and current affairs

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs
29:29
Wordsworth On Ongoing Citizenship Saga And 'Maggot' Incident Emma Alberici speaks to political correspondent Matt Wordsworth about the ongoing citizenship saga and why his interview with Labor MP Justine Keay has gone viral. Mathias Cormann Responds To Citizenship Furore Emma Alberici speaks to finance minister Mathias Cormann about the ongoing citizenship saga and the same-sex marriage bill. Grieving Father Seeks Solution To Rural Australia's Suicide Problem Every year 3000 people die by suicide in Australia. It's a staggering number, and a significant proportion of those deaths are not in the big cities. For most people living in rural and regional communities, the first place they will turn after attempting suicide or having suicidal thoughts is the emergency department. In some cases, those who present to hospitals are being turned away, with deadly consequences. Naomi Selvaratnam produced this report, and a warning, this story contains themes that may be distressing to some viewers. Farewell Lateline: Our Correspondents Reflect On Their Most Memorable Moments Over the past 28 years Lateline has distinguished itself as the home of breaking news from overseas. Our correspondents have braved riots, floods, fires and earthquakes to bring you some of the biggest events in modern history. As we prepare to farewell Lateline, the current crop of the ABC's international reporters look back on some of their most memorable moments.
Celebrations As Australia Votes To Legalise Same-sex Marriage
Australians have sent a firm message to Parliament, voting overwhelmingly in favour of allowing same-sex couples to marry. John Stewart and Kathleen Calderwood followed campaigners from both sides in the final weeks before today's result.

Same-sex Marriage Bill Introduced In Parliament, With Senators To Debate Religious Exemptions
In the political arena, the battle lines are being drawn. Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull is pledging to legalise same-sex marriage by the end of the year, amid intense pressure from some in his own ranks to ensure religious freedoms are protected. Michael Vincent reports.

Panel: Same-sex Marriage And Religious Freedom
There's been much discussion during the campaign about the issue of religious freedom and what a yes vote and any legislation that followed might mean. Matt Wordsworth speaks to Jesuit priest Father Frank Brennan, Islamic Council of Queensland spokesman Ali Kadri and Anglican bishop and chair of the Coalition for Marriage, Michael Stead, about what same-sex marriage legiglation might mean for religious freedom.

Senator Says Same-sex Marriage Laws Will Take Concerns Of 'No' Voters Into Account
Matt Wordsworth speaks to Liberal senator for Western Australia, Dean Smith, who introduced his bill to legalise same-sex marriage in Parliament today, about anticipated debates on the extent of protections for religious leaders.

Lateline: November 15, 2017

News and current affairs

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs
29:36
Celebrations As Australia Votes To Legalise Same-sex Marriage Australians have sent a firm message to Parliament, voting overwhelmingly in favour of allowing same-sex couples to marry. John Stewart and Kathleen Calderwood followed campaigners from both sides in the final weeks before today's result. Same-sex Marriage Bill Introduced In Parliament, With Senators To Debate Religious Exemptions In the political arena, the battle lines are being drawn. Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull is pledging to legalise same-sex marriage by the end of the year, amid intense pressure from some in his own ranks to ensure religious freedoms are protected. Michael Vincent reports. Panel: Same-sex Marriage And Religious Freedom There's been much discussion during the campaign about the issue of religious freedom and what a yes vote and any legislation that followed might mean. Matt Wordsworth speaks to Jesuit priest Father Frank Brennan, Islamic Council of Queensland spokesman Ali Kadri and Anglican bishop and chair of the Coalition for Marriage, Michael Stead, about what same-sex marriage legiglation might mean for religious freedom. Senator Says Same-sex Marriage Laws Will Take Concerns Of 'No' Voters Into Account Matt Wordsworth speaks to Liberal senator for Western Australia, Dean Smith, who introduced his bill to legalise same-sex marriage in Parliament today, about anticipated debates on the extent of protections for religious leaders.
The Beyonce Of Opera: De Niese Back Home For Australian Debut
Young Talent Time was the variety TV show that introduced Australian audiences to names such as Tina Arena, Dannii Minogue and Debra Byrne. At just nine years old, Danielle de Niese also got her first big break as the Young Talent Time's youngest-ever winner. Fast-forward to today and she's an internationally acclaimed soprano, gracing stages all over the world. The singer is making her local operatic debut in Opera Australia's production of The Merry Widow which opens next week in her hometown of Melbourne. Kyle Taylor has more.

School Of The Future: What Can Kids Learn From Robots?
There are calls tonight for a major rethink of the way teachers teach and the way children learn to better prepare them for the impacts of artificial intelligence and other advances in technology. We're taking you inside one primary school that's embracing technology in the classroom revealing the lessons kids can learn from robots and it turns out they can teach the machines a thing or two as well. Kyle Taylor produced this report.

NSW Education: Schools Must Prepare Kids For Intelligent Machines
Mark Scott heads up the New South Wales Department of Education. At a schools symposium today in Sydney, he delivered a speech detailing his vision for the future of education in a world dominated by intelligent machines. He also expressed alarm about the low participation rate of girls in maths and science subjects and talked about the urgent task of revamping a crowded curriculum that might benefit from a paring back that sees fewer subjects taught in greater depth.

Lateline: November 9, 2017

News and current affairs

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs
29:06
The Beyonce Of Opera: De Niese Back Home For Australian Debut Young Talent Time was the variety TV show that introduced Australian audiences to names such as Tina Arena, Dannii Minogue and Debra Byrne. At just nine years old, Danielle de Niese also got her first big break as the Young Talent Time's youngest-ever winner. Fast-forward to today and she's an internationally acclaimed soprano, gracing stages all over the world. The singer is making her local operatic debut in Opera Australia's production of The Merry Widow which opens next week in her hometown of Melbourne. Kyle Taylor has more. School Of The Future: What Can Kids Learn From Robots? There are calls tonight for a major rethink of the way teachers teach and the way children learn to better prepare them for the impacts of artificial intelligence and other advances in technology. We're taking you inside one primary school that's embracing technology in the classroom revealing the lessons kids can learn from robots and it turns out they can teach the machines a thing or two as well. Kyle Taylor produced this report. NSW Education: Schools Must Prepare Kids For Intelligent Machines Mark Scott heads up the New South Wales Department of Education. At a schools symposium today in Sydney, he delivered a speech detailing his vision for the future of education in a world dominated by intelligent machines. He also expressed alarm about the low participation rate of girls in maths and science subjects and talked about the urgent task of revamping a crowded curriculum that might benefit from a paring back that sees fewer subjects taught in greater depth.
Gamble of life
Soon after meeting and falling in love, Andrew and Olivia Densley agreed they both adored kids and wanted a large family. They got married and got on with their dream. But after having their fourth child they received terrible news. Their third child, a son, had a genetic immune deficiency disease which looked likely to kill him. Just when all seemed lost though, he was saved by a long-shot miracle. His little brother, the couple’s fourth child, was a match as a bone marrow donor. But as Tom Steinfort reports, at this point the story gets even more complicated. While Andrew and Olivia knew the substantial risks of having more children, it didn’t stop them. Olivia fell pregnant with a fifth child who was also born with the usually fatal disease. But having rolled the dice and lost, the couple refused to give up. It has taken several years and a hundred thousand dollars, but they’ve managed to engineer another extraordinary solution.
A magpie called Penguin
Somewhere, flying around the northern beaches of Sydney, is a magpie called Penguin who often thinks she’s a human. And if that’s not incredible enough, this amazing bird has another claim to fame – she’s a lifesaver. Penguin taught Sam Bloom, a mother of three, how to live again after she fell from a balcony, broke her back and became a paraplegic. It’s a truly inspiring tale that not surprisingly will also soon be a Hollywood movie

60 Minutes: Gamble of life/ A Magpie called Penguin

News and current affairs

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs
48:40
Gamble of life Soon after meeting and falling in love, Andrew and Olivia Densley agreed they both adored kids and wanted a large family. They got married and got on with their dream. But after having their fourth child they received terrible news. Their third child, a son, had a genetic immune deficiency disease which looked likely to kill him. Just when all seemed lost though, he was saved by a long-shot miracle. His little brother, the couple’s fourth child, was a match as a bone marrow donor. But as Tom Steinfort reports, at this point the story gets even more complicated. While Andrew and Olivia knew the substantial risks of having more children, it didn’t stop them. Olivia fell pregnant with a fifth child who was also born with the usually fatal disease. But having rolled the dice and lost, the couple refused to give up. It has taken several years and a hundred thousand dollars, but they’ve managed to engineer another extraordinary solution. A magpie called Penguin Somewhere, flying around the northern beaches of Sydney, is a magpie called Penguin who often thinks she’s a human. And if that’s not incredible enough, this amazing bird has another claim to fame – she’s a lifesaver. Penguin taught Sam Bloom, a mother of three, how to live again after she fell from a balcony, broke her back and became a paraplegic. It’s a truly inspiring tale that not surprisingly will also soon be a Hollywood movie
Rural News
A look at rural and regional issues making the news this week.
Heywire: Muriel
Muriel Hunter had a tragic start to life and struggled in school, but now she's fulfilling her dream
Defying the Drought
A large part of eastern Australia is drought declared, and the big dry is hitting farmers and communities hard. But some farmers seem to be defying the drought. Marty McCarthy hits the road to meet them.
Hall of Fame
The rural press club honour is awarded to Queensland-based journalists who have made a significant contribution to the profession for more than 20 years and have helped support the next generation of rural journalists. Pip has been a reporter on the ABC’s flagship rural current affairs program Landline for the past 25 years and its host since 2012.
Open Sesame
Farmers and scientists in central Queensland have just trialled the country’s first commercial crop of black sesame seed and early results are showing great potential.
Markets Report
Market activity and analysis with Kerry Lonergan.
Farm Tech
Farmers have partnered with programmers, engineers and inventors to help make farming more efficient. It’s part of a University ‘Tech-Connect’ program and together they’ve come up with some very creative solutions to some everyday on-farm problems.

Landline: August 12, 2018

Business and economics, Earth and environment, Sustainability, News and current affairs

Years 9-10, 11-12 Business and economics, Earth and environment, Sustainability, News and current affairs
57:15
Rural News A look at rural and regional issues making the news this week. Heywire: Muriel Muriel Hunter had a tragic start to life and struggled in school, but now she's fulfilling her dream Defying the Drought A large part of eastern Australia is drought declared, and the big dry is hitting farmers and communities hard. But some farmers seem to be defying the drought. Marty McCarthy hits the road to meet them. Hall of Fame The rural press club honour is awarded to Queensland-based journalists who have made a significant contribution to the profession for more than 20 years and have helped support the next generation of rural journalists. Pip has been a reporter on the ABC’s flagship rural current affairs program Landline for the past 25 years and its host since 2012. Open Sesame Farmers and scientists in central Queensland have just trialled the country’s first commercial crop of black sesame seed and early results are showing great potential. Markets Report Market activity and analysis with Kerry Lonergan. Farm Tech Farmers have partnered with programmers, engineers and inventors to help make farming more efficient. It’s part of a University ‘Tech-Connect’ program and together they’ve come up with some very creative solutions to some everyday on-farm problems.
From Fortnite to Candy Crush, for many people video games are a source of entertainment, relaxation, a chance to build friendships, or a career.
But for a minority, games can be a problem.
With 67 per cent of Australians playing video games, and 97 per cent of households with children having video games, Insight asks, “how much is too much? When does video gaming stop being fun?”
Laurie Darby represents the fastest growing segment of the population new to games - the over 65s. Retired and living alone, she tells Jenny Brockie that she checks in daily with her family and friends by playing word games on her mobile.
Zion, 11, loves playing Fortnite with his friends, and his mother, Rosie, works hard to set boundaries around his gaming. “He has other responsibilities he has to do first, like his homework, and walking and picking up after the dog,” she explains.
For Taei Aluni and Maddelin Walster, video games are a source of tension. Taei would keep playing if he was allowed to, but Maddelin says he’s “like a vacant partner” when he’s on the games, and it’s affecting their family.
In the wake of the World Health Organisation including “gaming disorder” in its latest International Classification of Diseases, Insight considers whether or not it’s the personality of the gamer, or features built into the games themselves, which sees some people become hooked, while others manage to keep it just for fun.

Insight: Game On

News and current affairs, Intercultural understanding

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs, Intercultural understanding
52:16
From Fortnite to Candy Crush, for many people video games are a source of entertainment, relaxation, a chance to build friendships, or a career. But for a minority, games can be a problem. With 67 per cent of Australians playing video games, and 97 per cent of households with children having video games, Insight asks, “how much is too much? When does video gaming stop being fun?” Laurie Darby represents the fastest growing segment of the population new to games - the over 65s. Retired and living alone, she tells Jenny Brockie that she checks in daily with her family and friends by playing word games on her mobile. Zion, 11, loves playing Fortnite with his friends, and his mother, Rosie, works hard to set boundaries around his gaming. “He has other responsibilities he has to do first, like his homework, and walking and picking up after the dog,” she explains. For Taei Aluni and Maddelin Walster, video games are a source of tension. Taei would keep playing if he was allowed to, but Maddelin says he’s “like a vacant partner” when he’s on the games, and it’s affecting their family. In the wake of the World Health Organisation including “gaming disorder” in its latest International Classification of Diseases, Insight considers whether or not it’s the personality of the gamer, or features built into the games themselves, which sees some people become hooked, while others manage to keep it just for fun.
This week on Dateline, we meet the young journalists trying to unite Rio de Janeiro’s favelas through a news site, started by a local when he was just 11 years old.
When the police come ‘pow, pow, pow’. You get down. Everyone runs into the corridors!”
It’s a tough pill to swallow, but this is the every day reality for children who go to school in Rio de Janeiro’s favelas.
With members from rival drug gangs manning every street corner, and a military campaign adamant on stamping out drug related violence, navigating these slums has become a matter of life and death for most residents. In 2017 alone, 6,731 people lost their lives to violent crimes in Rio.
13 years ago, Rene Silva founded his community newspaper, Voz das Comunidades (VOZ). Once a small-time paper operating from Rene’s home, the young journalists working for VOZ now have deep ties in local communities, and often serve as a point of reference for the larger Brazilian press.
Kitted out in VOZ polos, the reporters use their smartphones and social media to give voice to parents like Fabio and Paloma Morre, who lost their son, Benjamin, to the crossfire between local police and drug traffickers. He was just shy of two years old.
His father, Fabio, waves his phone – with a video of a toddler laughing playing on the screen - at the young journalist interviewing him.
“This is one of the last pictures I took with him – this is a video of him dancing!”
It’s a scene journalist Luana Melo has seen all too many times before.
“It’s important for us to tell the story of the day Benjamin died. So these incidents won’t happen inside the favelas, with such violence.”

Dateline: Children Caught in the Crossfire

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
25:07
This week on Dateline, we meet the young journalists trying to unite Rio de Janeiro’s favelas through a news site, started by a local when he was just 11 years old. When the police come ‘pow, pow, pow’. You get down. Everyone runs into the corridors!” It’s a tough pill to swallow, but this is the every day reality for children who go to school in Rio de Janeiro’s favelas. With members from rival drug gangs manning every street corner, and a military campaign adamant on stamping out drug related violence, navigating these slums has become a matter of life and death for most residents. In 2017 alone, 6,731 people lost their lives to violent crimes in Rio. 13 years ago, Rene Silva founded his community newspaper, Voz das Comunidades (VOZ). Once a small-time paper operating from Rene’s home, the young journalists working for VOZ now have deep ties in local communities, and often serve as a point of reference for the larger Brazilian press. Kitted out in VOZ polos, the reporters use their smartphones and social media to give voice to parents like Fabio and Paloma Morre, who lost their son, Benjamin, to the crossfire between local police and drug traffickers. He was just shy of two years old. His father, Fabio, waves his phone – with a video of a toddler laughing playing on the screen - at the young journalist interviewing him. “This is one of the last pictures I took with him – this is a video of him dancing!” It’s a scene journalist Luana Melo has seen all too many times before. “It’s important for us to tell the story of the day Benjamin died. So these incidents won’t happen inside the favelas, with such violence.”
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