Interview with Environment Minister, Greg Hunt

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Interview with Environment Minister, Greg Hunt

Clip from Lateline  |  ABC  |  December 1, 2015

Interview with Greg Hunt in Paris who says Australia's plans to cut carbon emissions by 26 to 28 percent by 2030 are achievable

Interview with Greg Hunt in Paris who says Australia's plans to cut carbon emissions by 26 to 28 percent by 2030 are achievable

Community clip
Wordsworth On Ongoing Citizenship Saga And 'Maggot' Incident
Emma Alberici speaks to political correspondent Matt Wordsworth about the ongoing citizenship saga and why his interview with Labor MP Justine Keay has gone viral.

Mathias Cormann Responds To Citizenship Furore
Emma Alberici speaks to finance minister Mathias Cormann about the ongoing citizenship saga and the same-sex marriage bill.

Grieving Father Seeks Solution To Rural Australia's Suicide Problem
Every year 3000 people die by suicide in Australia. It's a staggering number, and a significant proportion of those deaths are not in the big cities. For most people living in rural and regional communities, the first place they will turn after attempting suicide or having suicidal thoughts is the emergency department. In some cases, those who present to hospitals are being turned away, with deadly consequences. Naomi Selvaratnam produced this report, and a warning, this story contains themes that may be distressing to some viewers.

Farewell Lateline: Our Correspondents Reflect On Their Most Memorable Moments
Over the past 28 years Lateline has distinguished itself as the home of breaking news from overseas. Our correspondents have braved riots, floods, fires and earthquakes to bring you some of the biggest events in modern history. As we prepare to farewell Lateline, the current crop of the ABC's international reporters look back on some of their most memorable moments.

Lateline: December 6, 2017

News and current affairs

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs
29:29
Wordsworth On Ongoing Citizenship Saga And 'Maggot' Incident Emma Alberici speaks to political correspondent Matt Wordsworth about the ongoing citizenship saga and why his interview with Labor MP Justine Keay has gone viral. Mathias Cormann Responds To Citizenship Furore Emma Alberici speaks to finance minister Mathias Cormann about the ongoing citizenship saga and the same-sex marriage bill. Grieving Father Seeks Solution To Rural Australia's Suicide Problem Every year 3000 people die by suicide in Australia. It's a staggering number, and a significant proportion of those deaths are not in the big cities. For most people living in rural and regional communities, the first place they will turn after attempting suicide or having suicidal thoughts is the emergency department. In some cases, those who present to hospitals are being turned away, with deadly consequences. Naomi Selvaratnam produced this report, and a warning, this story contains themes that may be distressing to some viewers. Farewell Lateline: Our Correspondents Reflect On Their Most Memorable Moments Over the past 28 years Lateline has distinguished itself as the home of breaking news from overseas. Our correspondents have braved riots, floods, fires and earthquakes to bring you some of the biggest events in modern history. As we prepare to farewell Lateline, the current crop of the ABC's international reporters look back on some of their most memorable moments.
Celebrations As Australia Votes To Legalise Same-sex Marriage
Australians have sent a firm message to Parliament, voting overwhelmingly in favour of allowing same-sex couples to marry. John Stewart and Kathleen Calderwood followed campaigners from both sides in the final weeks before today's result.

Same-sex Marriage Bill Introduced In Parliament, With Senators To Debate Religious Exemptions
In the political arena, the battle lines are being drawn. Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull is pledging to legalise same-sex marriage by the end of the year, amid intense pressure from some in his own ranks to ensure religious freedoms are protected. Michael Vincent reports.

Panel: Same-sex Marriage And Religious Freedom
There's been much discussion during the campaign about the issue of religious freedom and what a yes vote and any legislation that followed might mean. Matt Wordsworth speaks to Jesuit priest Father Frank Brennan, Islamic Council of Queensland spokesman Ali Kadri and Anglican bishop and chair of the Coalition for Marriage, Michael Stead, about what same-sex marriage legiglation might mean for religious freedom.

Senator Says Same-sex Marriage Laws Will Take Concerns Of 'No' Voters Into Account
Matt Wordsworth speaks to Liberal senator for Western Australia, Dean Smith, who introduced his bill to legalise same-sex marriage in Parliament today, about anticipated debates on the extent of protections for religious leaders.

Lateline: November 15, 2017

News and current affairs

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs
29:36
Celebrations As Australia Votes To Legalise Same-sex Marriage Australians have sent a firm message to Parliament, voting overwhelmingly in favour of allowing same-sex couples to marry. John Stewart and Kathleen Calderwood followed campaigners from both sides in the final weeks before today's result. Same-sex Marriage Bill Introduced In Parliament, With Senators To Debate Religious Exemptions In the political arena, the battle lines are being drawn. Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull is pledging to legalise same-sex marriage by the end of the year, amid intense pressure from some in his own ranks to ensure religious freedoms are protected. Michael Vincent reports. Panel: Same-sex Marriage And Religious Freedom There's been much discussion during the campaign about the issue of religious freedom and what a yes vote and any legislation that followed might mean. Matt Wordsworth speaks to Jesuit priest Father Frank Brennan, Islamic Council of Queensland spokesman Ali Kadri and Anglican bishop and chair of the Coalition for Marriage, Michael Stead, about what same-sex marriage legiglation might mean for religious freedom. Senator Says Same-sex Marriage Laws Will Take Concerns Of 'No' Voters Into Account Matt Wordsworth speaks to Liberal senator for Western Australia, Dean Smith, who introduced his bill to legalise same-sex marriage in Parliament today, about anticipated debates on the extent of protections for religious leaders.
The Beyonce Of Opera: De Niese Back Home For Australian Debut
Young Talent Time was the variety TV show that introduced Australian audiences to names such as Tina Arena, Dannii Minogue and Debra Byrne. At just nine years old, Danielle de Niese also got her first big break as the Young Talent Time's youngest-ever winner. Fast-forward to today and she's an internationally acclaimed soprano, gracing stages all over the world. The singer is making her local operatic debut in Opera Australia's production of The Merry Widow which opens next week in her hometown of Melbourne. Kyle Taylor has more.

School Of The Future: What Can Kids Learn From Robots?
There are calls tonight for a major rethink of the way teachers teach and the way children learn to better prepare them for the impacts of artificial intelligence and other advances in technology. We're taking you inside one primary school that's embracing technology in the classroom revealing the lessons kids can learn from robots and it turns out they can teach the machines a thing or two as well. Kyle Taylor produced this report.

NSW Education: Schools Must Prepare Kids For Intelligent Machines
Mark Scott heads up the New South Wales Department of Education. At a schools symposium today in Sydney, he delivered a speech detailing his vision for the future of education in a world dominated by intelligent machines. He also expressed alarm about the low participation rate of girls in maths and science subjects and talked about the urgent task of revamping a crowded curriculum that might benefit from a paring back that sees fewer subjects taught in greater depth.

Lateline: November 9, 2017

News and current affairs

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs
29:06
The Beyonce Of Opera: De Niese Back Home For Australian Debut Young Talent Time was the variety TV show that introduced Australian audiences to names such as Tina Arena, Dannii Minogue and Debra Byrne. At just nine years old, Danielle de Niese also got her first big break as the Young Talent Time's youngest-ever winner. Fast-forward to today and she's an internationally acclaimed soprano, gracing stages all over the world. The singer is making her local operatic debut in Opera Australia's production of The Merry Widow which opens next week in her hometown of Melbourne. Kyle Taylor has more. School Of The Future: What Can Kids Learn From Robots? There are calls tonight for a major rethink of the way teachers teach and the way children learn to better prepare them for the impacts of artificial intelligence and other advances in technology. We're taking you inside one primary school that's embracing technology in the classroom revealing the lessons kids can learn from robots and it turns out they can teach the machines a thing or two as well. Kyle Taylor produced this report. NSW Education: Schools Must Prepare Kids For Intelligent Machines Mark Scott heads up the New South Wales Department of Education. At a schools symposium today in Sydney, he delivered a speech detailing his vision for the future of education in a world dominated by intelligent machines. He also expressed alarm about the low participation rate of girls in maths and science subjects and talked about the urgent task of revamping a crowded curriculum that might benefit from a paring back that sees fewer subjects taught in greater depth.
In Ireland, women can go to jail for getting an abortion, even in cases of rape. As the country votes on whether to change its conservative abortion laws, we take the pulse of a nation divided down the middle.
On May 25, Ireland heading to the polls in a landmark referendum that could finally overturn its abortion laws.
Enshrined in the country's constitution is the protection of the unborn’s right to life – but at what cost?
Dateline reporter Shaunagh Connaire goes to the heart of the referendum debate to meet women and families from both sides of a bitterly divisive issue.
Hitting the streets of Waterford, Shaunagh meets a new generation of young, grassroots campaigners called the Youth Defence who are fighting hard to keep Ireland abortion free. 
“This is a human rights issue," explains Christine Darcy, a trainee teacher working for Youth Defence.
"We have constitutional protection of the unborn, like an equal right to life for the mother and the baby. Why would we take that out of our constitution?"
For many Irish women, the current laws are driving them to extreme lengths - In 2016, 3,265 Irish women travelled to the UK to get an abortion.
Due to the expense, and lack of local support, most make the trip in one day, risking their health in the process. 
"I was given a card with a number on it in order to protect your identity," says one such woman Cathy, who paid £400 for her surgical abortion in a Manchester clinic.
“It’s really heartbreaking to know that you are almost being exported; that this country doesn’t want to know about your problems or your issues.”

Dateline: Ireland's Abortion Debate

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
26:02
In Ireland, women can go to jail for getting an abortion, even in cases of rape. As the country votes on whether to change its conservative abortion laws, we take the pulse of a nation divided down the middle. On May 25, Ireland heading to the polls in a landmark referendum that could finally overturn its abortion laws. Enshrined in the country's constitution is the protection of the unborn’s right to life – but at what cost? Dateline reporter Shaunagh Connaire goes to the heart of the referendum debate to meet women and families from both sides of a bitterly divisive issue. Hitting the streets of Waterford, Shaunagh meets a new generation of young, grassroots campaigners called the Youth Defence who are fighting hard to keep Ireland abortion free. “This is a human rights issue," explains Christine Darcy, a trainee teacher working for Youth Defence. "We have constitutional protection of the unborn, like an equal right to life for the mother and the baby. Why would we take that out of our constitution?" For many Irish women, the current laws are driving them to extreme lengths - In 2016, 3,265 Irish women travelled to the UK to get an abortion. Due to the expense, and lack of local support, most make the trip in one day, risking their health in the process. "I was given a card with a number on it in order to protect your identity," says one such woman Cathy, who paid £400 for her surgical abortion in a Manchester clinic. “It’s really heartbreaking to know that you are almost being exported; that this country doesn’t want to know about your problems or your issues.”
Complict
Complicit: the workers paying the price for our mobile phone obsession.
"There were iPhone screens and Nokia screens...I held the phone screen in my left hand, and a piece of cloth in my right hand... Wiping was the only thing I did besides eating and sleeping." Teenage worker
Mobile phones, smartphones and tablets have revolutionised the way we communicate but the technology we are addicted to has had toxic consequences.
"I knew we worked with chemicals, but I had no idea that it's poison." Young worker
China produces approximately 90% of the world's consumer electronics. The factories making the components for these electronic goods are filled with young workers. Some have been exposed to poisonous chemicals, with devastating results.
"Many co-workers developed the exact same symptoms. When I walked, it looked like I had uneven legs. It would take 10 minutes to take a two-minute walk. My legs felt too heavy to move." Worker
This investigation, filmed secretly over four years, exposed the use of harmful chemicals in the factories producing the products many of us use. Hidden cameras captured the working conditions inside the factories churning out these products.
"It was the cleaning solution he used, which contained benzene, when he was working at the electronics factory that caused his disease." Father of sick worker
The film charts the growing realisation amongst the workers that their illnesses stem from their work and follows their fight for compensation.
"After we discovered so many workers with leukemia...more media reports followed up and showed that these workers were chemically poisoned." Worker activist
The landmark investigation led Apple to ban the use of benzene, a known carcinogen, and n-hexane, a chemical that damages the nervous system.
But the ban does not apply to subcontractors who make up two-thirds of Apple's supply chain. And around 500 other chemicals are still used to produce electronics, mostly in the developing world, where there are few or no regulations to protect the workers who make them.
"Many of the workers that I've helped got occupational diseases due to exposure to toxic chemicals. Many are from the electronics industry. They made cell phones, computers, semiconductors etc." Worker activist.

Four Corners: May 21, 2018

News and current affairs, Civics and citizenship

Years 11-12 News and current affairs, Civics and citizenship
43:45
Complict Complicit: the workers paying the price for our mobile phone obsession. "There were iPhone screens and Nokia screens...I held the phone screen in my left hand, and a piece of cloth in my right hand... Wiping was the only thing I did besides eating and sleeping." Teenage worker Mobile phones, smartphones and tablets have revolutionised the way we communicate but the technology we are addicted to has had toxic consequences. "I knew we worked with chemicals, but I had no idea that it's poison." Young worker China produces approximately 90% of the world's consumer electronics. The factories making the components for these electronic goods are filled with young workers. Some have been exposed to poisonous chemicals, with devastating results. "Many co-workers developed the exact same symptoms. When I walked, it looked like I had uneven legs. It would take 10 minutes to take a two-minute walk. My legs felt too heavy to move." Worker This investigation, filmed secretly over four years, exposed the use of harmful chemicals in the factories producing the products many of us use. Hidden cameras captured the working conditions inside the factories churning out these products. "It was the cleaning solution he used, which contained benzene, when he was working at the electronics factory that caused his disease." Father of sick worker The film charts the growing realisation amongst the workers that their illnesses stem from their work and follows their fight for compensation. "After we discovered so many workers with leukemia...more media reports followed up and showed that these workers were chemically poisoned." Worker activist The landmark investigation led Apple to ban the use of benzene, a known carcinogen, and n-hexane, a chemical that damages the nervous system. But the ban does not apply to subcontractors who make up two-thirds of Apple's supply chain. And around 500 other chemicals are still used to produce electronics, mostly in the developing world, where there are few or no regulations to protect the workers who make them. "Many of the workers that I've helped got occupational diseases due to exposure to toxic chemicals. Many are from the electronics industry. They made cell phones, computers, semiconductors etc." Worker activist.
Family businesses sent to the wall by their own banks
The Banking Royal Commission has today been hearing about the dysfunctional world of lending to small business. Two business owners tell 7.30 their stories about dealing with the banks. One even blames his lender for sending him broke.

More government MPs come out in support of outlawing live sheep exports
Late last week it seemed that the Turnbull government had stared down the intense political pressure to close down live sheep exports. But it now seems some of its own backbenchers, including a former minister, are agitating for change.

Investigation to go ahead into Israeli response to Gaza protest shootings
An international investigation will examine Israel's lethal response to protest in Gaza, which have left more than 100 Palestinians dead this year. Protests and shootings at Israel's fence around Gaza are a long running feature of life Palestinian territory.

Stargazers turn their eyes to the sky in a record attempt
Thousands of amateur astronomers will this week attempt to break the world record for the most stargazers at multiple venues. It's part of the BBC's popular Stargazing Live program, and it's co-host, Professor Brian Cox, has done as much as anyone to take science, and particularly astronomy to a mass audience.

Hundreds of Commonwealth Games attendees are asking for protection visas
Lawyer David Manne says he is representing a number of people who attended the Commonwealth Games and are now seeking asylum in Australia.

7.30: May 21, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
30:22
Family businesses sent to the wall by their own banks The Banking Royal Commission has today been hearing about the dysfunctional world of lending to small business. Two business owners tell 7.30 their stories about dealing with the banks. One even blames his lender for sending him broke. More government MPs come out in support of outlawing live sheep exports Late last week it seemed that the Turnbull government had stared down the intense political pressure to close down live sheep exports. But it now seems some of its own backbenchers, including a former minister, are agitating for change. Investigation to go ahead into Israeli response to Gaza protest shootings An international investigation will examine Israel's lethal response to protest in Gaza, which have left more than 100 Palestinians dead this year. Protests and shootings at Israel's fence around Gaza are a long running feature of life Palestinian territory. Stargazers turn their eyes to the sky in a record attempt Thousands of amateur astronomers will this week attempt to break the world record for the most stargazers at multiple venues. It's part of the BBC's popular Stargazing Live program, and it's co-host, Professor Brian Cox, has done as much as anyone to take science, and particularly astronomy to a mass audience. Hundreds of Commonwealth Games attendees are asking for protection visas Lawyer David Manne says he is representing a number of people who attended the Commonwealth Games and are now seeking asylum in Australia.
The Teller
The regard which Australians have for banks has never been lower, and with the banking Royal Commission recommencing its public hearings on Monday, it will probably sink even further. Liz Hayes meets a very brave former bank worker who, through shame, feels compelled to speak out. For three decades Catherine was a teller. She says at first it was an honourable job, and she genuinely thought her role was to help the customers, but then the banks started putting profits before people - and her bosses made her do the same.
The dirty tricks Catherine reveals provide an alarming insight into the culture of Australian banking institutions.

The Holy Real Estate
The great prize in the battle for dominance between Israelis and Palestinians is Jerusalem. Ironically, its name means “city of peace”, but that’s something neither side seems to want. This week there were more protests, and more deaths, after the United States relocated its embassy to the holy city. The move recognises Jerusalem as the capital of the Jewish state and that enrages Palestinians like nothing else.

The Royal Wedding
Allison Langdon reports on the most anticipated wedding in years, and asks palace insiders where to now for the Royal newlyweds?
The week leading up to her wedding to Prince Harry is not what Meghan Markle ever would have expected – with her own family stealing the bride-to-be’s limelight. While it has been a stressful time for Ms Markle, there’s one thing Hollywood celebrities and the Royal Family both understand – the show must go on!

60 Minutes: May 20, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs
47:25
The Teller The regard which Australians have for banks has never been lower, and with the banking Royal Commission recommencing its public hearings on Monday, it will probably sink even further. Liz Hayes meets a very brave former bank worker who, through shame, feels compelled to speak out. For three decades Catherine was a teller. She says at first it was an honourable job, and she genuinely thought her role was to help the customers, but then the banks started putting profits before people - and her bosses made her do the same. The dirty tricks Catherine reveals provide an alarming insight into the culture of Australian banking institutions. The Holy Real Estate The great prize in the battle for dominance between Israelis and Palestinians is Jerusalem. Ironically, its name means “city of peace”, but that’s something neither side seems to want. This week there were more protests, and more deaths, after the United States relocated its embassy to the holy city. The move recognises Jerusalem as the capital of the Jewish state and that enrages Palestinians like nothing else. The Royal Wedding Allison Langdon reports on the most anticipated wedding in years, and asks palace insiders where to now for the Royal newlyweds? The week leading up to her wedding to Prince Harry is not what Meghan Markle ever would have expected – with her own family stealing the bride-to-be’s limelight. While it has been a stressful time for Ms Markle, there’s one thing Hollywood celebrities and the Royal Family both understand – the show must go on!
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