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Lateline: April 19, 2010
April 19, 2010
ABC  |  April 19, 2010

Stories include, 'COAG to confront GST dispute', 'Rudd to take health to election: Shanahan', 'Carl Williams beaten to death', 'Airlines demand end to European flight ban', 'EU ministers meet to re-open skies', 'Federal Government's Curtin policy slammed', 'Thai military prepares for more protests', 'Indonesia relocates Sri Lankan asylum seekers', 'Corporations undermine Cairo rubbish recyclers'.


Stories include, 'COAG to confront GST dispute', 'Rudd to take health to election: Shanahan', 'Carl Williams beaten to death', 'Airlines demand end to European flight ban', 'EU ministers meet to re-open skies', 'Federal Government's Curtin policy slammed', 'Thai military prepares for more protests', 'Indonesia relocates Sri Lankan asylum seekers', 'Corporations undermine Cairo rubbish recyclers'.


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