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Landline: September 9, 2018
September 9, 2018
ABC  |  September 9, 2018

A Smarter Way: A biodegradable film laid over seedlings could change the way thirsty crops like cotton are grown. The innovative technology has been proven to boost yield and maximise water usage and is now being used on farms around the world.
Heywire: Zurack
Zurack Dempsey shares his story about almost going off the rails before finding a hidden talent.
Rural News: A look at rural and regional issues making the news this week
Markets Report: Market activity and analysis with Kerry Lonergan
Campdraft Hero: Campdrafting is a family affair for national champion Pete Comiskey

A Smarter Way: A biodegradable film laid over seedlings could change the way thirsty crops like cotton are grown. The innovative technology has been proven to boost yield and maximise water usage and is now being used on farms around the world.
Heywire: Zurack
Zurack Dempsey shares his story about almost going off the rails before finding a hidden talent.
Rural News: A look at rural and regional issues making the news this week
Markets Report: Market activity and analysis with Kerry Lonergan
Campdraft Hero: Campdrafting is a family affair for national champion Pete Comiskey

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58:29 | Business and economics
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Landline

ABC

Changes in long range forecasts and weather patterns mean innovating and adapting is the new normal for many farmers. Rethinking current practices could be the key to surviving changing climate behaviour. There’s an old saying about soil ‘they’re not making any more of it’ - but some farmers are. They’re drawing on the excess carbon that’s warming the atmosphere and putting it in their soil – building fertility and holding precious water. From solar powered ear-tags for remotely managing cattle, to precision weed-spraying drones, technology is helping solve everyday problems in agriculture. But 50% of farmers rely on mobile networks for their internet connectivity, and data access and speed in the bush are not keeping up. A food technology entrepreneur has found success with a chicken substitute and is working on beef and bacon options. Growing food represents a red-hot opportunity to big investors and corporates have spent hundreds of millions of dollars on agriculture in Australia – from cattle stations to almond groves. It can mean development for farmland, infrastructure for regions and more trade opportunities but does it signal the demise of the family farm? Ninety-five per-cent of farms in Australia are run by families. It’s more expensive now to become a farmer, but a new generation is changing conventional farming models and finding other ways to get into the food production business.

Business and economics related videos

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58:29 | Business and economics
image/svg+xml

Landline

ABC

Changes in long range forecasts and weather patterns mean innovating and adapting is the new normal for many farmers. Rethinking current practices could be the key to surviving changing climate behaviour. There’s an old saying about soil ‘they’re not making any more of it’ - but some farmers are. They’re drawing on the excess carbon that’s warming the atmosphere and putting it in their soil – building fertility and holding precious water. From solar powered ear-tags for remotely managing cattle, to precision weed-spraying drones, technology is helping solve everyday problems in agriculture. But 50% of farmers rely on mobile networks for their internet connectivity, and data access and speed in the bush are not keeping up. A food technology entrepreneur has found success with a chicken substitute and is working on beef and bacon options. Growing food represents a red-hot opportunity to big investors and corporates have spent hundreds of millions of dollars on agriculture in Australia – from cattle stations to almond groves. It can mean development for farmland, infrastructure for regions and more trade opportunities but does it signal the demise of the family farm? Ninety-five per-cent of farms in Australia are run by families. It’s more expensive now to become a farmer, but a new generation is changing conventional farming models and finding other ways to get into the food production business.

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