Julia Zemiro's Home Delivery

Julia Zemiro's Home Delivery

Nicky Winmar
ABC  |  July 4, 2018
Classification: Parental Guidance Classification: Parental Guidance
This video has closed captioning

Nicky Winmar is an AFL hero and one of the best Indigenous players ever to kick a Sherrin football. With Nicky as her guest, Julia travels to Pingelly, 158km outside of Perth in the West Australian wheat belt.

Nicky Winmar is an AFL hero and one of the best Indigenous players ever to kick a Sherrin football. With Nicky as her guest, Julia travels to Pingelly, 158km outside of Perth in the West Australian wheat belt.

In this warm and witty episode of Home Delivery, Julia travels to the Northern Territory to meet Miranda Tapsell in the heart of the glorious Kakadu National Park. As an only child growing up in the tiny town of Jabiru, Miranda tells that she was regularly “subjected to bushwalking”. She developed a love of performing from a very young age, and joined the Jabiru Tappers at age six, and delighted her parents with an endless series of plays starring her friends and stuffed toys.

They visit Jabiru Area School, where Miranda recalls that a visit by Aaron Pedersen ignited a dream of taking up a career as an actor. She also relates that a troubling episode of racial bullying shattered her carefree childhood.

The family moved to Darwin for the final years of Miranda’s schooling, so she and Julia take a road trip to the big smoke. They visit Darwin High School where Miranda performed in plays and musicals in the school’s astonishing amphitheatre.

It was here that Miranda seriously started to plan an acting career. She tells Julia about attending summer courses at NIDA and seeing a stage performance of the Sapphires. From that moment on Miranda wanted nothing more than to be a ‘Sapphire’.

On a headland overlooking the beautiful Mindil Beach, Julia and Miranda talk about her courageous acceptance speech at the 2015 Logie awards, when Miranda challenged the Australian television industry to put more people of colour on our screens, and they reflect on her journey from a small Kakadu town to the red carpet at Cannes.

PRODUCTION DETAILS:
A Cordell Jigsaw Zapruder production. Presenter and co-producer Julia Zemiro. CJZ Executive Producer Nick Murray. CJZ Executive Producer / Director Damian Davis. ABC Executive Producer Richard Huddleston. ABC Head of Entertainment Jon Casimir.

#HomeDelivery

Julia Zemiro's Home Delivery: Miranda Tapsell

Media arts, History, Personal and social capability

Years 11-12 Media arts, History, Personal and social capability
26:59
In this warm and witty episode of Home Delivery, Julia travels to the Northern Territory to meet Miranda Tapsell in the heart of the glorious Kakadu National Park. As an only child growing up in the tiny town of Jabiru, Miranda tells that she was regularly “subjected to bushwalking”. She developed a love of performing from a very young age, and joined the Jabiru Tappers at age six, and delighted her parents with an endless series of plays starring her friends and stuffed toys. They visit Jabiru Area School, where Miranda recalls that a visit by Aaron Pedersen ignited a dream of taking up a career as an actor. She also relates that a troubling episode of racial bullying shattered her carefree childhood. The family moved to Darwin for the final years of Miranda’s schooling, so she and Julia take a road trip to the big smoke. They visit Darwin High School where Miranda performed in plays and musicals in the school’s astonishing amphitheatre. It was here that Miranda seriously started to plan an acting career. She tells Julia about attending summer courses at NIDA and seeing a stage performance of the Sapphires. From that moment on Miranda wanted nothing more than to be a ‘Sapphire’. On a headland overlooking the beautiful Mindil Beach, Julia and Miranda talk about her courageous acceptance speech at the 2015 Logie awards, when Miranda challenged the Australian television industry to put more people of colour on our screens, and they reflect on her journey from a small Kakadu town to the red carpet at Cannes. PRODUCTION DETAILS: A Cordell Jigsaw Zapruder production. Presenter and co-producer Julia Zemiro. CJZ Executive Producer Nick Murray. CJZ Executive Producer / Director Damian Davis. ABC Executive Producer Richard Huddleston. ABC Head of Entertainment Jon Casimir. #HomeDelivery
For years gladiators have been legendary figures of the Ancient World; the stuff of Hollywood blockbusters like Spartacus, or Gladiator. But our knowledge has been based largely on speculation - until now. Timewatch have secured exclusive access to the biggest archaeological gladiator research project of all time. As it approaches its conclusion, Gladiator CSI reveals the secrets of how gladiators lived, fought and died, not from speculation but from forensic science. In the 1990s a survey for the ancient course of the Holy Procession Path between the temple of Artemis (one of the seven Wonders of the World) and the city of Ephesus in Turkey came upon an unexpected find: a mass burial site. But most of the cadavers did not bear the signs of death from natural causes. Instead, they seem to have met a violent end. In 2002 two forensic anthropologists went to investigate: this was a gladiator graveyard. Although the corpses of gladiators had been found before, they tended to be isolated examples. In this graveyard, no less than 67 were buried. The amount of data was unprecedented. Employing two of the world's leading forensics anthropologists as our two crime scene investigators, this is the story of their investigation. Their research makes ground-breaking conclusions probing popular myths about gladiators: Is the currently fashionable thesis that although gladiators fought vicious contests, they rarely battled to the death, really true? Were the losers of gladiatorial contests really dispatched in the arena by the turning of the emperor's thumb? Were gladiators treated as no more than animals, with no provision for their health or well-being? Spanning two centuries, our 67 corpses reveal great technological changes in fighting equipment and wounds from weapons that were hitherto thought only to be the stuff of myth (like the cubic fore dent).

Gladiator Graveyard

Ancient history, History

Years 11-12 Ancient history, History
48:01
For years gladiators have been legendary figures of the Ancient World; the stuff of Hollywood blockbusters like Spartacus, or Gladiator. But our knowledge has been based largely on speculation - until now. Timewatch have secured exclusive access to the biggest archaeological gladiator research project of all time. As it approaches its conclusion, Gladiator CSI reveals the secrets of how gladiators lived, fought and died, not from speculation but from forensic science. In the 1990s a survey for the ancient course of the Holy Procession Path between the temple of Artemis (one of the seven Wonders of the World) and the city of Ephesus in Turkey came upon an unexpected find: a mass burial site. But most of the cadavers did not bear the signs of death from natural causes. Instead, they seem to have met a violent end. In 2002 two forensic anthropologists went to investigate: this was a gladiator graveyard. Although the corpses of gladiators had been found before, they tended to be isolated examples. In this graveyard, no less than 67 were buried. The amount of data was unprecedented. Employing two of the world's leading forensics anthropologists as our two crime scene investigators, this is the story of their investigation. Their research makes ground-breaking conclusions probing popular myths about gladiators: Is the currently fashionable thesis that although gladiators fought vicious contests, they rarely battled to the death, really true? Were the losers of gladiatorial contests really dispatched in the arena by the turning of the emperor's thumb? Were gladiators treated as no more than animals, with no provision for their health or well-being? Spanning two centuries, our 67 corpses reveal great technological changes in fighting equipment and wounds from weapons that were hitherto thought only to be the stuff of myth (like the cubic fore dent).
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