The experience of people who have migrated to Australia

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The experience of people who have migrated to Australia

Clip from Insight: Culture Test  |  SBS  |  September 18, 2007

This clip is about the struggle of migrant families have struggled with what it means to be Australian and balancing this with n

This clip is about the struggle of migrant families have struggled with what it means to be Australian and balancing this with n

Community clip
When Fidan Shevket started dating her boyfriend, she wouldn’t let him leave a toothbrush at her Sydney apartment. She was worried it could be used as evidence of a de facto relationship, which could give him claim to part of her home if they ever broke up.
“If we're ever going to move in together, if we're ever going to get married, if we're ever going to do anything to make this relationship go to the next level - then I absolutely want a [prenup],” Fidan tells Insight’s Jenny Brockie.
Fidan has been a family lawyer for 15 years and has seen how bitter break-ups can get, especially when it comes to the division of assets. So, after two and a half years with her boyfriend, she is writing up what she calls “the greatest [prenup] ever drafted.”
When Kathy Robinson met her now husband, Cam Robinson, money was tight. She had four children and had just come out of a difficult break-up. She was left with the family home, a big mortgage and a little in the way of savings.
Cam, who was single with no children and owned multiple properties, had far more in assets than Kathy – so a discussion about getting a prenup arose early in the relationship. But the couple quickly decided it wasn’t for them.
“Going into a relationship you have to have trust,” Kathy says. “If you can’t trust your partner, then who can you trust really?”
Family lawyer, Jodylee Bartal, writes prenups for her clients and says they are no longer just the domain of the rich and famous.
But often certain clauses she gets asked to include in a prenup aren’t legally binding, and putting too much detail into prenups can increase the risk of the Family Court voiding the agreement.
Family lawyer, Kasey Fox, recently signed a prenup with her fiancé, Travis Goode. They decided against putting this kind of detail into their agreement.
“I actually think it can be dangerous to put too much of that detail in about what's going to happen during the relationship, because the whole idea of one of these agreements is that they only come into effect if you separate,” she says.
For all of Fidan’s efforts, her boyfriend has not yet signed the prenup.
“If he doesn't sign, I've been very clear on this: if he doesn't sign it there's big trouble, meaning the relationship will probably come to an end – almost definitely, it will come to an end.”

Insight: To Have and Withhold

News and current affairs, Intercultural understanding

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs, Intercultural understanding
52:20
When Fidan Shevket started dating her boyfriend, she wouldn’t let him leave a toothbrush at her Sydney apartment. She was worried it could be used as evidence of a de facto relationship, which could give him claim to part of her home if they ever broke up. “If we're ever going to move in together, if we're ever going to get married, if we're ever going to do anything to make this relationship go to the next level - then I absolutely want a [prenup],” Fidan tells Insight’s Jenny Brockie. Fidan has been a family lawyer for 15 years and has seen how bitter break-ups can get, especially when it comes to the division of assets. So, after two and a half years with her boyfriend, she is writing up what she calls “the greatest [prenup] ever drafted.” When Kathy Robinson met her now husband, Cam Robinson, money was tight. She had four children and had just come out of a difficult break-up. She was left with the family home, a big mortgage and a little in the way of savings. Cam, who was single with no children and owned multiple properties, had far more in assets than Kathy – so a discussion about getting a prenup arose early in the relationship. But the couple quickly decided it wasn’t for them. “Going into a relationship you have to have trust,” Kathy says. “If you can’t trust your partner, then who can you trust really?” Family lawyer, Jodylee Bartal, writes prenups for her clients and says they are no longer just the domain of the rich and famous. But often certain clauses she gets asked to include in a prenup aren’t legally binding, and putting too much detail into prenups can increase the risk of the Family Court voiding the agreement. Family lawyer, Kasey Fox, recently signed a prenup with her fiancé, Travis Goode. They decided against putting this kind of detail into their agreement. “I actually think it can be dangerous to put too much of that detail in about what's going to happen during the relationship, because the whole idea of one of these agreements is that they only come into effect if you separate,” she says. For all of Fidan’s efforts, her boyfriend has not yet signed the prenup. “If he doesn't sign, I've been very clear on this: if he doesn't sign it there's big trouble, meaning the relationship will probably come to an end – almost definitely, it will come to an end.”
Jenny Brockie takes a look at what it takes to turn your life around after a catastrophic injury.
Life can change in an instant. And in that instant, many hopes and dreams can be cruelly snatched away. When we’re hit with catastrophic injuries, how and where do we even begin to move forward and rebuild our lives?
Jaimen Hudson was a sporty 17-year-old with the world at his feet when an off-road motorbike accident in 2008 left him a quadriplegic.
“I lived for the outdoors,” Jaimen tells Insight’s Jenny Brockie. “And to have that all taken away from you in one foul swoop is quite a wake-up call.”
With a similar passion for the outdoors, Sam Bloom loved mountain biking, running, surfing and playing soccer. It was a lifestyle she enjoyed with her three active sons – but one that was turned upside during a family holiday in Thailand.
“I just pulled a sheet over my head and burst into tears … I didn’t react very well at all,” recalls Sam, when told by doctors she’d never walk again.
But Sam’s turning point and road to recovery would come from the most unlikely of sources: a baby magpie chick called Penguin.
At 21, Louise Ellery suffered a serious brain injury, smashed pelvis and broken ribs after a car accident. The former model and ballroom dancer was on life support for a week and lost her spleen. She also had to learn to walk, talk and eat again.
“I loved ballroom dancing and I thought if I couldn’t dance, what’s the point in living?” Louise says.
It took 10 years for Louise to accept her disability. 
Like Louise, Nick has achieved more than he could have hoped. He was seven years old when he became blind from an injury. His last memory of sight was the vision of his mum’s face.
In the 50 years since, Nick has reached the summit of Kilimanjaro, trekked the Simpson Desert, climbed to Everest base camp, ran the New York Marathon three times and also represented Australian at the Paralympics.

Insight: Rebuilding Your Life

News and current affairs, Intercultural understanding

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs, Intercultural understanding
52:25
Jenny Brockie takes a look at what it takes to turn your life around after a catastrophic injury. Life can change in an instant. And in that instant, many hopes and dreams can be cruelly snatched away. When we’re hit with catastrophic injuries, how and where do we even begin to move forward and rebuild our lives? Jaimen Hudson was a sporty 17-year-old with the world at his feet when an off-road motorbike accident in 2008 left him a quadriplegic. “I lived for the outdoors,” Jaimen tells Insight’s Jenny Brockie. “And to have that all taken away from you in one foul swoop is quite a wake-up call.” With a similar passion for the outdoors, Sam Bloom loved mountain biking, running, surfing and playing soccer. It was a lifestyle she enjoyed with her three active sons – but one that was turned upside during a family holiday in Thailand. “I just pulled a sheet over my head and burst into tears … I didn’t react very well at all,” recalls Sam, when told by doctors she’d never walk again. But Sam’s turning point and road to recovery would come from the most unlikely of sources: a baby magpie chick called Penguin. At 21, Louise Ellery suffered a serious brain injury, smashed pelvis and broken ribs after a car accident. The former model and ballroom dancer was on life support for a week and lost her spleen. She also had to learn to walk, talk and eat again. “I loved ballroom dancing and I thought if I couldn’t dance, what’s the point in living?” Louise says. It took 10 years for Louise to accept her disability. Like Louise, Nick has achieved more than he could have hoped. He was seven years old when he became blind from an injury. His last memory of sight was the vision of his mum’s face. In the 50 years since, Nick has reached the summit of Kilimanjaro, trekked the Simpson Desert, climbed to Everest base camp, ran the New York Marathon three times and also represented Australian at the Paralympics.
From Fortnite to Candy Crush, for many people video games are a source of entertainment, relaxation, a chance to build friendships, or a career.
But for a minority, games can be a problem.
With 67 per cent of Australians playing video games, and 97 per cent of households with children having video games, Insight asks, “how much is too much? When does video gaming stop being fun?”
Laurie Darby represents the fastest growing segment of the population new to games - the over 65s. Retired and living alone, she tells Jenny Brockie that she checks in daily with her family and friends by playing word games on her mobile.
Zion, 11, loves playing Fortnite with his friends, and his mother, Rosie, works hard to set boundaries around his gaming. “He has other responsibilities he has to do first, like his homework, and walking and picking up after the dog,” she explains.
For Taei Aluni and Maddelin Walster, video games are a source of tension. Taei would keep playing if he was allowed to, but Maddelin says he’s “like a vacant partner” when he’s on the games, and it’s affecting their family.
In the wake of the World Health Organisation including “gaming disorder” in its latest International Classification of Diseases, Insight considers whether or not it’s the personality of the gamer, or features built into the games themselves, which sees some people become hooked, while others manage to keep it just for fun.

Insight: Game On

News and current affairs, Intercultural understanding

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs, Intercultural understanding
52:16
From Fortnite to Candy Crush, for many people video games are a source of entertainment, relaxation, a chance to build friendships, or a career. But for a minority, games can be a problem. With 67 per cent of Australians playing video games, and 97 per cent of households with children having video games, Insight asks, “how much is too much? When does video gaming stop being fun?” Laurie Darby represents the fastest growing segment of the population new to games - the over 65s. Retired and living alone, she tells Jenny Brockie that she checks in daily with her family and friends by playing word games on her mobile. Zion, 11, loves playing Fortnite with his friends, and his mother, Rosie, works hard to set boundaries around his gaming. “He has other responsibilities he has to do first, like his homework, and walking and picking up after the dog,” she explains. For Taei Aluni and Maddelin Walster, video games are a source of tension. Taei would keep playing if he was allowed to, but Maddelin says he’s “like a vacant partner” when he’s on the games, and it’s affecting their family. In the wake of the World Health Organisation including “gaming disorder” in its latest International Classification of Diseases, Insight considers whether or not it’s the personality of the gamer, or features built into the games themselves, which sees some people become hooked, while others manage to keep it just for fun.
Tara Westover grew up with radical, survivalist parents in rural Idaho who didn’t believe in doctors, hospitals and mainstream education. At 17, Westover decided to educate herself as a means of escape. She got into university but academically she missed out on learning about events in history including the holocaust and the civil rights movement. She also struggled socially.
Ben Shenton was raised in a notorious Australian cult called The Family. At 18 months of age his mother handed him over to a woman called Anne Hamilton-Byrne whose followers of the cult believed was Jesus Christ reincarnated.
Shenton lived on an isolated property two hours from Melbourne. There was physical abuse and at times the children were deprived of food. Ben was 15 when police raided the property and he began a new chapter in his life.
Emma Gingerich was raised in an Amish family in Ohio and Missouri. They had no electricity or running water and had very little contact with the outside world.
Gingerich was only allowed to be educated to grade eight and there was no science or geography, only reading, writing and maths. 
At 18 she left her family and the Amish community. Her transition to the outside world wasn’t easy and she says she was raped soon after leaving.
The Atchley family live in a remote part of Alaska, four hours from the nearest town. They only got the Internet this year and admit they struggle to keep up with current events and popular culture.
Their 14-year-old son, Sky, lives with them and is home-schooled. Since discovering the Internet Sky wants to become an online gaming commentator and says this might involve him one day leaving his family home and moving to the city.

Insight: Isolated

News and current affairs, Intercultural understanding

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs, Intercultural understanding
51:18
Tara Westover grew up with radical, survivalist parents in rural Idaho who didn’t believe in doctors, hospitals and mainstream education. At 17, Westover decided to educate herself as a means of escape. She got into university but academically she missed out on learning about events in history including the holocaust and the civil rights movement. She also struggled socially. Ben Shenton was raised in a notorious Australian cult called The Family. At 18 months of age his mother handed him over to a woman called Anne Hamilton-Byrne whose followers of the cult believed was Jesus Christ reincarnated. Shenton lived on an isolated property two hours from Melbourne. There was physical abuse and at times the children were deprived of food. Ben was 15 when police raided the property and he began a new chapter in his life. Emma Gingerich was raised in an Amish family in Ohio and Missouri. They had no electricity or running water and had very little contact with the outside world. Gingerich was only allowed to be educated to grade eight and there was no science or geography, only reading, writing and maths. At 18 she left her family and the Amish community. Her transition to the outside world wasn’t easy and she says she was raped soon after leaving. The Atchley family live in a remote part of Alaska, four hours from the nearest town. They only got the Internet this year and admit they struggle to keep up with current events and popular culture. Their 14-year-old son, Sky, lives with them and is home-schooled. Since discovering the Internet Sky wants to become an online gaming commentator and says this might involve him one day leaving his family home and moving to the city.
If you’ve ever wondered about how long (or short) your attention span is, or perhaps even worried that there’s something seriously wrong with your ability to pay attention – you’re not alone. 

Insight guest Leanne became concerned about her attention span when she caught up with an old friend over lunch, but couldn’t stop checking her phone and thinking about what else she could be doing – like scrolling through her Facebook. 

At home, she says she gets distracted by something as trivial as a bad smell, or the noise of someone mowing the lawn. It can take her off task and take up her attention for the entire day.

This week on Insight, Leanne’s attention is tested and the findings surprise her.

And guest host Janice Petersen asks the “5 billion dollar question,” as neuroscientist, Associate Professor Paul Dux puts it – can we train, and even increase our attention spans? And how do you do it?

When the stakes are as high as a plane full of people, or a life on the operating table – how can that affect your ability to hold attention, and what can happen if you don’t? 

“The worst case is that two aircraft collide and a catastrophic failure in the system occurs,” air traffic controller Tom McRobert says.

For neurosurgeon Nazih Asaad, the consequences can also be fatal and with the trust of the patient in his hands, the potential risks of the surgery can weigh on him in the lead up to the operation.

AFL player for the GWS Giants Heath Shaw was diagnosed with ADHD when he was a teenager. He says some of the behaviours have followed him into adulthood and on the field.

Insight asks – what is attention, and how can it impact your life? How do you know if your attention span is normal? And what makes some people better at paying attention than others?

Insight: Attention

News and current affairs, Intercultural understanding

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs, Intercultural understanding
53:43
If you’ve ever wondered about how long (or short) your attention span is, or perhaps even worried that there’s something seriously wrong with your ability to pay attention – you’re not alone. Insight guest Leanne became concerned about her attention span when she caught up with an old friend over lunch, but couldn’t stop checking her phone and thinking about what else she could be doing – like scrolling through her Facebook. At home, she says she gets distracted by something as trivial as a bad smell, or the noise of someone mowing the lawn. It can take her off task and take up her attention for the entire day. This week on Insight, Leanne’s attention is tested and the findings surprise her. And guest host Janice Petersen asks the “5 billion dollar question,” as neuroscientist, Associate Professor Paul Dux puts it – can we train, and even increase our attention spans? And how do you do it? When the stakes are as high as a plane full of people, or a life on the operating table – how can that affect your ability to hold attention, and what can happen if you don’t? “The worst case is that two aircraft collide and a catastrophic failure in the system occurs,” air traffic controller Tom McRobert says. For neurosurgeon Nazih Asaad, the consequences can also be fatal and with the trust of the patient in his hands, the potential risks of the surgery can weigh on him in the lead up to the operation. AFL player for the GWS Giants Heath Shaw was diagnosed with ADHD when he was a teenager. He says some of the behaviours have followed him into adulthood and on the field. Insight asks – what is attention, and how can it impact your life? How do you know if your attention span is normal? And what makes some people better at paying attention than others?
Jenny Brockie takes a look at why people are suffering from more food insecurities.
Once or twice a week, Sunita and her husband go without a meal so their two children can have something to eat. Other times, they turn to Weet-Bix for breakfast, lunch and dinner.
A growing number of Australians are going hungry. CEO of Foodbank, Australia’s largest hunger relief organisation, Brianna Casey says 3.6 million Australians have been food insecure in the last 12 months – including one in five children.
Renee and Grant’s lives changed overnight when Grant had an accident at work. The pair suddenly found themselves struggling to afford food for their family of six, while trying to keep up with mortgage repayments and other bills. Even with the help of a community food program that provides low cost groceries, they both say they still skip meals each week so their children can eat.

Aunty Lena, a member of the Stolen Generations, has three adult children, four grandchildren and three great-grandchildren living under her roof. With only her aged pension for income, she struggles to feed her large family after paying the rent and electricity, but she’s resolved to keeping her household together.
She mostly chooses the food her grandchildren want to eat from a local food relief program, and says meat is a luxury.
Charities and food rescue organisations have stepped up to help provide nutritious food and hot meals for those who might otherwise go without. And thousands of schools across the country are now running breakfast clubs to make sure their students have a healthy meal to start the school day.
But Brianna admits food relief programs are “a bandaid over a gaping wound,” and that while sourcing food for those in need is crucial, it doesn’t get to the root cause of food insecurity.
This week, Insight asks – who’s going hungry in Australia, and why?

Insight: Hungry

News and current affairs, Intercultural understanding

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs, Intercultural understanding
52:48
Jenny Brockie takes a look at why people are suffering from more food insecurities. Once or twice a week, Sunita and her husband go without a meal so their two children can have something to eat. Other times, they turn to Weet-Bix for breakfast, lunch and dinner. A growing number of Australians are going hungry. CEO of Foodbank, Australia’s largest hunger relief organisation, Brianna Casey says 3.6 million Australians have been food insecure in the last 12 months – including one in five children. Renee and Grant’s lives changed overnight when Grant had an accident at work. The pair suddenly found themselves struggling to afford food for their family of six, while trying to keep up with mortgage repayments and other bills. Even with the help of a community food program that provides low cost groceries, they both say they still skip meals each week so their children can eat. Aunty Lena, a member of the Stolen Generations, has three adult children, four grandchildren and three great-grandchildren living under her roof. With only her aged pension for income, she struggles to feed her large family after paying the rent and electricity, but she’s resolved to keeping her household together. She mostly chooses the food her grandchildren want to eat from a local food relief program, and says meat is a luxury. Charities and food rescue organisations have stepped up to help provide nutritious food and hot meals for those who might otherwise go without. And thousands of schools across the country are now running breakfast clubs to make sure their students have a healthy meal to start the school day. But Brianna admits food relief programs are “a bandaid over a gaping wound,” and that while sourcing food for those in need is crucial, it doesn’t get to the root cause of food insecurity. This week, Insight asks – who’s going hungry in Australia, and why?
Sizing up Steroids
Casey, 29, started using steroids a couple of years ago when he found out he had low testosterone. He bought testosterone on the black market and then started taking other anabolic steroids. He found a YouTube channel that he says showed him how to use safely. He also got information through online forums where users talk about what to take and for how long. He says he’s had no side effects because he takes low doses.
Anthony started using anabolic steroids when he was 16. He says the results he was getting naturally weren’t enough. He first started using testosterone and quickly moved onto stronger substances because he says progression was a drug in itself. Despite some side effects, he says he would look forward to injecting steroids because he knew each time he used, it would mean a better work out and bigger body.
‘Brian’ spent two years researching anabolic steroids before he started taking them. He got information from online forums where he says medically minded users discuss dosages and substances. He does what’s called ‘cruising’ and ‘blasting’ where he takes substances for 12 weeks and then comes off them. He says his side effects have included testicle shrinkage and delays in ejaculation when having sex. He disagrees with the laws in NSW and Queensland which classify steroids the same as heroin and amphetamines. He thinks they don’t match the reality of the situation.
‘Stan’ has seven convictions for importing, manufacturing and using steroids. At one point he was making anabolic steroids which he says are very easy to manufacture. He would make up to $4000 profit a week. He was also diagnosed with muscle dysmorphia when he was 18 and used it as a defence in court. He stopped using after his last arrest.
Prof. Ann Conway is an Endocrinologist who specialises in male diseases and conditions. She says there is no safe level of using steroids when not prescribed by a doctor. She says using can cause suppression of reproductive system, effect fertility, damage the liver and cause cardiac issues. She doesn't think GPs should be helping people use steroids safely but instead telling them to stop using.
Insight talks to users, former users, doctors and lawyers about who is using steroids, why they use and how that use is managed in Australia.

Insight: Sizing Up Steroids

News and current affairs, Intercultural understanding

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs, Intercultural understanding
54:31
Sizing up Steroids Casey, 29, started using steroids a couple of years ago when he found out he had low testosterone. He bought testosterone on the black market and then started taking other anabolic steroids. He found a YouTube channel that he says showed him how to use safely. He also got information through online forums where users talk about what to take and for how long. He says he’s had no side effects because he takes low doses. Anthony started using anabolic steroids when he was 16. He says the results he was getting naturally weren’t enough. He first started using testosterone and quickly moved onto stronger substances because he says progression was a drug in itself. Despite some side effects, he says he would look forward to injecting steroids because he knew each time he used, it would mean a better work out and bigger body. ‘Brian’ spent two years researching anabolic steroids before he started taking them. He got information from online forums where he says medically minded users discuss dosages and substances. He does what’s called ‘cruising’ and ‘blasting’ where he takes substances for 12 weeks and then comes off them. He says his side effects have included testicle shrinkage and delays in ejaculation when having sex. He disagrees with the laws in NSW and Queensland which classify steroids the same as heroin and amphetamines. He thinks they don’t match the reality of the situation. ‘Stan’ has seven convictions for importing, manufacturing and using steroids. At one point he was making anabolic steroids which he says are very easy to manufacture. He would make up to $4000 profit a week. He was also diagnosed with muscle dysmorphia when he was 18 and used it as a defence in court. He stopped using after his last arrest. Prof. Ann Conway is an Endocrinologist who specialises in male diseases and conditions. She says there is no safe level of using steroids when not prescribed by a doctor. She says using can cause suppression of reproductive system, effect fertility, damage the liver and cause cardiac issues. She doesn't think GPs should be helping people use steroids safely but instead telling them to stop using. Insight talks to users, former users, doctors and lawyers about who is using steroids, why they use and how that use is managed in Australia.
Jenny Brockie takes a look at what happens when coal seam gas comes to town. Steven Jones, a Narrabri local of 35 years, lives on 800 acres near the NSW Pilliga Forest. Part of his property falls within the boundaries of a proposed coal seam gas drilling area.
After living next door to exploration gas wells, he says he would be happy to have the wells on his property and doesn’t have any concerns with this type of resource being developed in the region. “As long as the government keeps an eye on it to make sure they don’t do wrong…I’m 100 per cent for them.”

But some Narrabri locals are less certain. Jon-Maree wouldn’t be happy to have the wells on her land out of concern about the potential environmental effects, in particular the risk to the region’s water supply.
“I think it's really important to understand that a rural property, without water, is nothing. Without water our communities don't function.”
That’s a concern shared by many vocal opponents from Coonamble, a small rural town, almost 200km from the proposed project area.
Adam and Rowena Macrae are farmers who have poured money into their almost 4,000 acre property.
Part of a 461km pipeline, that will transport the gas from the project to the NSW market, is slated to be built under their land.
They feel there is too much uncertainty around the project and its associated infrastructure.
“I think that the risks are too high and we're not prepared to take those risks with our family.”
Gas company Santos has overseen exploration in the area in recent years and says these wells could provide up to 50 per cent of NSW’s gas needs. Last year, Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull urged the NSW Government to approve the Narrabri Gas Project.
But local opinion about the project is divided. More than 23,000 submissions were received by the NSW Department of Planning, making it the most protested project in the history of the department.
With a looming domestic gas shortage on the horizon and the region awaiting to hear whether the project gets given the green light by the NSW Government, a special edition of Insight travels to Narrabri to hear from those who may be affected by the project and its infrastructure.

Insight: Gassy Coonamble

News and current affairs, Intercultural understanding

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs, Intercultural understanding
52:36
Jenny Brockie takes a look at what happens when coal seam gas comes to town. Steven Jones, a Narrabri local of 35 years, lives on 800 acres near the NSW Pilliga Forest. Part of his property falls within the boundaries of a proposed coal seam gas drilling area. After living next door to exploration gas wells, he says he would be happy to have the wells on his property and doesn’t have any concerns with this type of resource being developed in the region. “As long as the government keeps an eye on it to make sure they don’t do wrong…I’m 100 per cent for them.” But some Narrabri locals are less certain. Jon-Maree wouldn’t be happy to have the wells on her land out of concern about the potential environmental effects, in particular the risk to the region’s water supply. “I think it's really important to understand that a rural property, without water, is nothing. Without water our communities don't function.” That’s a concern shared by many vocal opponents from Coonamble, a small rural town, almost 200km from the proposed project area. Adam and Rowena Macrae are farmers who have poured money into their almost 4,000 acre property. Part of a 461km pipeline, that will transport the gas from the project to the NSW market, is slated to be built under their land. They feel there is too much uncertainty around the project and its associated infrastructure. “I think that the risks are too high and we're not prepared to take those risks with our family.” Gas company Santos has overseen exploration in the area in recent years and says these wells could provide up to 50 per cent of NSW’s gas needs. Last year, Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull urged the NSW Government to approve the Narrabri Gas Project. But local opinion about the project is divided. More than 23,000 submissions were received by the NSW Department of Planning, making it the most protested project in the history of the department. With a looming domestic gas shortage on the horizon and the region awaiting to hear whether the project gets given the green light by the NSW Government, a special edition of Insight travels to Narrabri to hear from those who may be affected by the project and its infrastructure.
Solo Parents
More and more single women are making the choice to become solo parents. As fertility deadlines approach, a new generation of women aren’t prepared to wait forever for 'Mr Right' to come along and risk missing out on the opportunity to have a child if a partner doesn’t arrive in time.
So Plan B is now a popular option: to go it alone with the help of a sperm donor. IVF clinics around the country are reporting the demand for donor sperm by single women is soaring as women are taking things into their own hands and fulfilling their dreams of being a mother.
Forty-one year old Anita Fox is typical of a number of professional women who've decided in their late thirties to have a baby without a partner. After a divorce, Anita didn’t want another relationship - but did want a baby - and she’s now a proud mother of two year-old Grace.
Amanda Hendren decided in her late thirties that she wanted to become a solo mum, and soon after gave birth to baby Elijha.  But in the first few years she was hit with depression and discovered, much to her shock, that motherhood “didn’t give me any value”. It took her several years to really settle into the role.
Stephanie Holt, at 26, decided she didn't want to wait to meet the right man to be the father of her children, and embarked on IVF treatment to become a solo mum. She gave birth to a healthy baby boy.
We speak to a number of women like Anita, Stephanie and Amanda who’ve chosen the donor sperm path, about the joys and challenges of solo parenting. We also speak to those in the process of trying to become solo parents via IVF and the children of single mothers by choice to reflect on the long term implications of being brought into the world via donor conception. 
And it’s not only women choosing to solo parent. A growing number of men are also choosing pursue parenthood alone, like Anthony Stralow, a single dad of three children who used two overseas surrogates and an egg donor to create the family he’d always wanted.
On Insight we examine the growing child-rearing trend of solo parenting by choice.

Insight: Solo Parents

News and current affairs, Intercultural understanding

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs, Intercultural understanding
53:29
Solo Parents More and more single women are making the choice to become solo parents. As fertility deadlines approach, a new generation of women aren’t prepared to wait forever for 'Mr Right' to come along and risk missing out on the opportunity to have a child if a partner doesn’t arrive in time. So Plan B is now a popular option: to go it alone with the help of a sperm donor. IVF clinics around the country are reporting the demand for donor sperm by single women is soaring as women are taking things into their own hands and fulfilling their dreams of being a mother. Forty-one year old Anita Fox is typical of a number of professional women who've decided in their late thirties to have a baby without a partner. After a divorce, Anita didn’t want another relationship - but did want a baby - and she’s now a proud mother of two year-old Grace. Amanda Hendren decided in her late thirties that she wanted to become a solo mum, and soon after gave birth to baby Elijha. But in the first few years she was hit with depression and discovered, much to her shock, that motherhood “didn’t give me any value”. It took her several years to really settle into the role. Stephanie Holt, at 26, decided she didn't want to wait to meet the right man to be the father of her children, and embarked on IVF treatment to become a solo mum. She gave birth to a healthy baby boy. We speak to a number of women like Anita, Stephanie and Amanda who’ve chosen the donor sperm path, about the joys and challenges of solo parenting. We also speak to those in the process of trying to become solo parents via IVF and the children of single mothers by choice to reflect on the long term implications of being brought into the world via donor conception. And it’s not only women choosing to solo parent. A growing number of men are also choosing pursue parenthood alone, like Anthony Stralow, a single dad of three children who used two overseas surrogates and an egg donor to create the family he’d always wanted. On Insight we examine the growing child-rearing trend of solo parenting by choice.
Joint Operation
How do you know when surgery is the best option and who makes the call?
By age 31, Rhys Donnan had undergone 11 operations on his knees.
He started having problems with his knees as a junior footballer at 13, and had his first operation at 18. From there, he underwent many more procedures – and revisions of those procedures – at one point having operations every 18 months.
“To be honest, I’ve become fairly blasé about [surgery] in the end,” he tells Jenny Brockie on this week’s episode of Insight. “I’d had so many … it just seemed the natural course of action.”
About a million orthopaedic surgeries are done each year in Australia. Many of these are joint replacements or spinal surgeries to treat osteoarthritis. Hip and knee replacements alone cost the health system more than any other hospital procedure – over $2 billion a year.
And some of these surgeries are on the rise. A Victorian study found that between 1994 to 2014, the number of hip replacements done went up 175 per cent, while knee replacements went up 285 per cent.
But the evidence for many commonly performed operations is far from clear cut.
Research suggests that about half of orthopaedic procedures have no scientific evidence to prove they work better than non-surgical treatments, and another quarter are no more effective than alternatives such as physiotherapy, exercise and weight loss.
Orthopaedic surgeon, Professor Ian Harris, says that some operations, such as spinal fusions, are more controversial.
“The best evidence we have is that it is not better than a structured non-operative alternative, such as physiotherapy or cognitive behavioural therapy,” he says.
After suffering debilitating back pain for several years, Simone Smith felt surgery was her only option.
“I had done everything, imaging, traction, physios, chiros, osteos … I can remember having to sit in the bottom of the shower because I couldn’t stand,” she tells Jenny. She says her surgery worked well, and helped ease her pain.
Jessica King also underwent spinal surgery. She says she wasn’t given any other options after hurting her lower back while pregnant.
“I feel like it was probably the most drastic sort of step, and I went there too soon,” she says. Jess still has ongoing nerve pain and numbness.

Insight: Joint Operation

News and current affairs, Intercultural understanding

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs, Intercultural understanding
52:46
Joint Operation How do you know when surgery is the best option and who makes the call? By age 31, Rhys Donnan had undergone 11 operations on his knees. He started having problems with his knees as a junior footballer at 13, and had his first operation at 18. From there, he underwent many more procedures – and revisions of those procedures – at one point having operations every 18 months. “To be honest, I’ve become fairly blasé about [surgery] in the end,” he tells Jenny Brockie on this week’s episode of Insight. “I’d had so many … it just seemed the natural course of action.” About a million orthopaedic surgeries are done each year in Australia. Many of these are joint replacements or spinal surgeries to treat osteoarthritis. Hip and knee replacements alone cost the health system more than any other hospital procedure – over $2 billion a year. And some of these surgeries are on the rise. A Victorian study found that between 1994 to 2014, the number of hip replacements done went up 175 per cent, while knee replacements went up 285 per cent. But the evidence for many commonly performed operations is far from clear cut. Research suggests that about half of orthopaedic procedures have no scientific evidence to prove they work better than non-surgical treatments, and another quarter are no more effective than alternatives such as physiotherapy, exercise and weight loss. Orthopaedic surgeon, Professor Ian Harris, says that some operations, such as spinal fusions, are more controversial. “The best evidence we have is that it is not better than a structured non-operative alternative, such as physiotherapy or cognitive behavioural therapy,” he says. After suffering debilitating back pain for several years, Simone Smith felt surgery was her only option. “I had done everything, imaging, traction, physios, chiros, osteos … I can remember having to sit in the bottom of the shower because I couldn’t stand,” she tells Jenny. She says her surgery worked well, and helped ease her pain. Jessica King also underwent spinal surgery. She says she wasn’t given any other options after hurting her lower back while pregnant. “I feel like it was probably the most drastic sort of step, and I went there too soon,” she says. Jess still has ongoing nerve pain and numbness.
Teaching Success
Six years ago, when Junior arrived at Sir Joseph Banks High School as a year 7 student, the school didn’t have a great reputation in the community.
“[A] lot of bus drivers wouldn't stop for us because they know how rowdy our school could have been in the bus,” he tells Insight’s Jenny Brockie.
The same year Junior arrived, only 30 per cent of year 12 students on an ATAR pathway went to university. But for the last two years, that number has risen to 100 per cent. Kids say they are now being enrolled because Sir Joseph Banks is “the best school in the area.”
Ninety-two per cent of students at the school, located in Sydney’s south-west, come from a non-English speaking background and 61 per cent of students fall in the most disadvantaged quarter of all Australian students. 
Given the makeup of the school, principal Murray Kitteringham admits the school is well-funded under the current Gonski model. This has allowed the school to hire a number of teachers and support staff to target the individualised needs of students in areas of both wellbeing and education.
For many students at Sir Joseph Banks, school is like a second home and the principal, Murray Kitteringham, says the belief that “happy kids learn” is central to the school’s focus. Junior agrees.
“[The teachers] don't just care about your marks, they care about your wellbeing and ultimately that care about your wellbeing will help improve your marks and help get you to that end role,” he says.
Marouf is School Captain and has been dux of his year every year since year 8. He is aiming to study medicine next year and like many students at the school, he’ll be the first one in his family to go to university.
“I'd like to break that mould kind of for my sisters, let them know that it is possible if they want to go down that path,” he tells Insight.
“[We] might not have that head start that some people may have … but I guess that's what motivates me personally to just continue going when I don't want to or don't feel like it.”
In this episode of Insight, students and teachers of Sir Joseph Banks High share stories of strength and reveal what it took to turn their school around.

Insight: Joey Banks High

News and current affairs, Intercultural understanding

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs, Intercultural understanding
52:06
Teaching Success Six years ago, when Junior arrived at Sir Joseph Banks High School as a year 7 student, the school didn’t have a great reputation in the community. “[A] lot of bus drivers wouldn't stop for us because they know how rowdy our school could have been in the bus,” he tells Insight’s Jenny Brockie. The same year Junior arrived, only 30 per cent of year 12 students on an ATAR pathway went to university. But for the last two years, that number has risen to 100 per cent. Kids say they are now being enrolled because Sir Joseph Banks is “the best school in the area.” Ninety-two per cent of students at the school, located in Sydney’s south-west, come from a non-English speaking background and 61 per cent of students fall in the most disadvantaged quarter of all Australian students. Given the makeup of the school, principal Murray Kitteringham admits the school is well-funded under the current Gonski model. This has allowed the school to hire a number of teachers and support staff to target the individualised needs of students in areas of both wellbeing and education. For many students at Sir Joseph Banks, school is like a second home and the principal, Murray Kitteringham, says the belief that “happy kids learn” is central to the school’s focus. Junior agrees. “[The teachers] don't just care about your marks, they care about your wellbeing and ultimately that care about your wellbeing will help improve your marks and help get you to that end role,” he says. Marouf is School Captain and has been dux of his year every year since year 8. He is aiming to study medicine next year and like many students at the school, he’ll be the first one in his family to go to university. “I'd like to break that mould kind of for my sisters, let them know that it is possible if they want to go down that path,” he tells Insight. “[We] might not have that head start that some people may have … but I guess that's what motivates me personally to just continue going when I don't want to or don't feel like it.” In this episode of Insight, students and teachers of Sir Joseph Banks High share stories of strength and reveal what it took to turn their school around.
Open Relationships
Wye is a Doctor who has been living with her partner Dave for five years. Dave is not Wye’s only partner – she also sees a man called Andrew. Dave has a girlfriend called Chrissy.
When Wye first met Dave she struggled with the idea of having an open relationship and did years of therapy to come to terms with what Dave wanted. In the beginning, Wye and Dave set ground rules including never sleeping with someone else in their bed. Andrew is only in a relationship with Wye and admits to sometimes feeling left out.
Lynn and Jim have been married for 13 years and have been together for 20. They also have five children. They have been seeing other people since the beginning of their relationship. At first it was just sex but it then evolved into having emotional connections with other people. Jim says he was born to live a polyamorous lifestyle and was the one to first suggest having an open marriage. Lynn admits she sometimes gets jealous but Jim says it’s rare for him to have those feelings. They’ve told all their children about their open marriage.
Jess and Lawrence have been together for five years. When they started dating, Lawrence asked Jess if she’d do swinging and she agreed. Their rule is to do everything together and that their open relationship only involves sex with other people and not emotional connections. Lawrence says he doesn’t get jealous but Jess sometimes does. They talk almost every day about their feelings and their open relationship.
Robin Rinaldi had been married for 18 years when she decided she wanted to try having an open relationship. She moved into a separate apartment during the week and slept with 12 people over one year. Her and her husband established rules including only seeing someone three times so that they wouldn’t fall in love. After a year, Robin went back to being monogamous with her husband but the marriage ended after someone who she’d slept with got back in touch with her. She’s now in a monogamous relationship with that man and says open relationships aren’t for her.
Helen Fisher is a biological anthropologist who has studied the chemistry of love. She thinks we’re built to form a pair bonding and that people in open relationships have to conquer and fight profoundly basic instincts. She says the reason they talk so much about their feelings is because they are trying to over-ride the brain system for romantic love and deep attachment.

Insight: Open Relationships

News and current affairs, Intercultural understanding

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs, Intercultural understanding
54:22
Open Relationships Wye is a Doctor who has been living with her partner Dave for five years. Dave is not Wye’s only partner – she also sees a man called Andrew. Dave has a girlfriend called Chrissy. When Wye first met Dave she struggled with the idea of having an open relationship and did years of therapy to come to terms with what Dave wanted. In the beginning, Wye and Dave set ground rules including never sleeping with someone else in their bed. Andrew is only in a relationship with Wye and admits to sometimes feeling left out. Lynn and Jim have been married for 13 years and have been together for 20. They also have five children. They have been seeing other people since the beginning of their relationship. At first it was just sex but it then evolved into having emotional connections with other people. Jim says he was born to live a polyamorous lifestyle and was the one to first suggest having an open marriage. Lynn admits she sometimes gets jealous but Jim says it’s rare for him to have those feelings. They’ve told all their children about their open marriage. Jess and Lawrence have been together for five years. When they started dating, Lawrence asked Jess if she’d do swinging and she agreed. Their rule is to do everything together and that their open relationship only involves sex with other people and not emotional connections. Lawrence says he doesn’t get jealous but Jess sometimes does. They talk almost every day about their feelings and their open relationship. Robin Rinaldi had been married for 18 years when she decided she wanted to try having an open relationship. She moved into a separate apartment during the week and slept with 12 people over one year. Her and her husband established rules including only seeing someone three times so that they wouldn’t fall in love. After a year, Robin went back to being monogamous with her husband but the marriage ended after someone who she’d slept with got back in touch with her. She’s now in a monogamous relationship with that man and says open relationships aren’t for her. Helen Fisher is a biological anthropologist who has studied the chemistry of love. She thinks we’re built to form a pair bonding and that people in open relationships have to conquer and fight profoundly basic instincts. She says the reason they talk so much about their feelings is because they are trying to over-ride the brain system for romantic love and deep attachment.
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