I Am Not Your Negro

I Am Not Your Negro

NITV  |  February 11, 2018

Based on Baldwin's unfinished manuscript, Remember This House, a stirring, personal account of the lives and deaths of his friends Medgar Evers, Malcom X and Martin Luther King Jr.

Based on Baldwin's unfinished manuscript, Remember This House, a stirring, personal account of the lives and deaths of his friends Medgar Evers, Malcom X and Martin Luther King Jr.

From Fortnite to Candy Crush, for many people video games are a source of entertainment, relaxation, a chance to build friendships, or a career.
But for a minority, games can be a problem.
With 67 per cent of Australians playing video games, and 97 per cent of households with children having video games, Insight asks, “how much is too much? When does video gaming stop being fun?”
Laurie Darby represents the fastest growing segment of the population new to games - the over 65s. Retired and living alone, she tells Jenny Brockie that she checks in daily with her family and friends by playing word games on her mobile.
Zion, 11, loves playing Fortnite with his friends, and his mother, Rosie, works hard to set boundaries around his gaming. “He has other responsibilities he has to do first, like his homework, and walking and picking up after the dog,” she explains.
For Taei Aluni and Maddelin Walster, video games are a source of tension. Taei would keep playing if he was allowed to, but Maddelin says he’s “like a vacant partner” when he’s on the games, and it’s affecting their family.
In the wake of the World Health Organisation including “gaming disorder” in its latest International Classification of Diseases, Insight considers whether or not it’s the personality of the gamer, or features built into the games themselves, which sees some people become hooked, while others manage to keep it just for fun.

Insight: Game On

News and current affairs, Intercultural understanding

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs, Intercultural understanding
52:16
From Fortnite to Candy Crush, for many people video games are a source of entertainment, relaxation, a chance to build friendships, or a career. But for a minority, games can be a problem. With 67 per cent of Australians playing video games, and 97 per cent of households with children having video games, Insight asks, “how much is too much? When does video gaming stop being fun?” Laurie Darby represents the fastest growing segment of the population new to games - the over 65s. Retired and living alone, she tells Jenny Brockie that she checks in daily with her family and friends by playing word games on her mobile. Zion, 11, loves playing Fortnite with his friends, and his mother, Rosie, works hard to set boundaries around his gaming. “He has other responsibilities he has to do first, like his homework, and walking and picking up after the dog,” she explains. For Taei Aluni and Maddelin Walster, video games are a source of tension. Taei would keep playing if he was allowed to, but Maddelin says he’s “like a vacant partner” when he’s on the games, and it’s affecting their family. In the wake of the World Health Organisation including “gaming disorder” in its latest International Classification of Diseases, Insight considers whether or not it’s the personality of the gamer, or features built into the games themselves, which sees some people become hooked, while others manage to keep it just for fun.
Tara Westover grew up with radical, survivalist parents in rural Idaho who didn’t believe in doctors, hospitals and mainstream education. At 17, Westover decided to educate herself as a means of escape. She got into university but academically she missed out on learning about events in history including the holocaust and the civil rights movement. She also struggled socially.
Ben Shenton was raised in a notorious Australian cult called The Family. At 18 months of age his mother handed him over to a woman called Anne Hamilton-Byrne whose followers of the cult believed was Jesus Christ reincarnated.
Shenton lived on an isolated property two hours from Melbourne. There was physical abuse and at times the children were deprived of food. Ben was 15 when police raided the property and he began a new chapter in his life.
Emma Gingerich was raised in an Amish family in Ohio and Missouri. They had no electricity or running water and had very little contact with the outside world.
Gingerich was only allowed to be educated to grade eight and there was no science or geography, only reading, writing and maths. 
At 18 she left her family and the Amish community. Her transition to the outside world wasn’t easy and she says she was raped soon after leaving.
The Atchley family live in a remote part of Alaska, four hours from the nearest town. They only got the Internet this year and admit they struggle to keep up with current events and popular culture.
Their 14-year-old son, Sky, lives with them and is home-schooled. Since discovering the Internet Sky wants to become an online gaming commentator and says this might involve him one day leaving his family home and moving to the city.

Insight: Isolated

News and current affairs, Intercultural understanding

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs, Intercultural understanding
51:18
Tara Westover grew up with radical, survivalist parents in rural Idaho who didn’t believe in doctors, hospitals and mainstream education. At 17, Westover decided to educate herself as a means of escape. She got into university but academically she missed out on learning about events in history including the holocaust and the civil rights movement. She also struggled socially. Ben Shenton was raised in a notorious Australian cult called The Family. At 18 months of age his mother handed him over to a woman called Anne Hamilton-Byrne whose followers of the cult believed was Jesus Christ reincarnated. Shenton lived on an isolated property two hours from Melbourne. There was physical abuse and at times the children were deprived of food. Ben was 15 when police raided the property and he began a new chapter in his life. Emma Gingerich was raised in an Amish family in Ohio and Missouri. They had no electricity or running water and had very little contact with the outside world. Gingerich was only allowed to be educated to grade eight and there was no science or geography, only reading, writing and maths. At 18 she left her family and the Amish community. Her transition to the outside world wasn’t easy and she says she was raped soon after leaving. The Atchley family live in a remote part of Alaska, four hours from the nearest town. They only got the Internet this year and admit they struggle to keep up with current events and popular culture. Their 14-year-old son, Sky, lives with them and is home-schooled. Since discovering the Internet Sky wants to become an online gaming commentator and says this might involve him one day leaving his family home and moving to the city.
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