Four Corners

Four Corners

Manchester Bomb - Our Story
ABC  |  September 10, 2018

They were young girls and teenagers, on a night out to see their favourite pop star. Many were attending a concert, without their parents for the first time.

As the Ariana Grande show ended, a terrorist detonated a home-made bomb packed with shrapnel.

Twenty-two people were killed, more than 250 injured and countless lives were impacted.

Filmed over many months, this program tells the story of several young survivors as they, and their families try to reclaim their lives.

Some are able to return to their old routines, but in the privacy of their bedrooms, the girls reveal their struggles.

Despite their darker days, some are trying to find inspiration for the future.

They were young girls and teenagers, on a night out to see their favourite pop star. Many were attending a concert, without their parents for the first time.

As the Ariana Grande show ended, a terrorist detonated a home-made bomb packed with shrapnel.

Twenty-two people were killed, more than 250 injured and countless lives were impacted.

Filmed over many months, this program tells the story of several young survivors as they, and their families try to reclaim their lives.

Some are able to return to their old routines, but in the privacy of their bedrooms, the girls reveal their struggles.

Despite their darker days, some are trying to find inspiration for the future.

Steve Bannon’s new world disorder.
As the Liberal Party tries to piece itself back together after the chaos of last week, Four Corners brings you an interview with the man hoping to overthrow the entire political class.
"I think that Australia is going to be a hotbed of populism."
Steve Bannon put Donald Trump in the White House and rewrote the rules of modern politics along the way. Described as the most dangerous political operative in America, the strategist, renegade Republican and professional provocateur channelled the anger and disappointment of those who felt left behind by globalism to install Donald Trump as president.
"There's a lot of anger out there and I think that this anger can be harnessed."
Now, he's taking his cause to the world in a crusade to "save" western civilisation, as the leader of a global populist-nationalist movement. He calls it a revolution.
"Populism is about getting decision making away from a set of kind of global elites...and get it back to working class people."
In an age of upheaval, he sees opportunity. After playing a key role in Britain's Brexit campaign, he's been forging links with right wing nationalist groups across Europe, including the French National Front.
Australia is next on his radar. He's identified Australia as ripe for his brand of revolution and plans to bring it here.
"Australia is at the tip of the spear on this."
In an interview with Sarah Ferguson, Bannon outlines his manifesto for change and why it resonates with people around the world.
"It doesn't matter how many liberal journalists come in here and say 'Oh this is a bunch of fascists, this is a bunch of Nazis, this is a bunch of racists.' This... is not going to stop."

Four Corners: Populist Revolution

News and current affairs, Civics and citizenship

Years 11-12 News and current affairs, Civics and citizenship
39:12
Steve Bannon’s new world disorder. As the Liberal Party tries to piece itself back together after the chaos of last week, Four Corners brings you an interview with the man hoping to overthrow the entire political class. "I think that Australia is going to be a hotbed of populism." Steve Bannon put Donald Trump in the White House and rewrote the rules of modern politics along the way. Described as the most dangerous political operative in America, the strategist, renegade Republican and professional provocateur channelled the anger and disappointment of those who felt left behind by globalism to install Donald Trump as president. "There's a lot of anger out there and I think that this anger can be harnessed." Now, he's taking his cause to the world in a crusade to "save" western civilisation, as the leader of a global populist-nationalist movement. He calls it a revolution. "Populism is about getting decision making away from a set of kind of global elites...and get it back to working class people." In an age of upheaval, he sees opportunity. After playing a key role in Britain's Brexit campaign, he's been forging links with right wing nationalist groups across Europe, including the French National Front. Australia is next on his radar. He's identified Australia as ripe for his brand of revolution and plans to bring it here. "Australia is at the tip of the spear on this." In an interview with Sarah Ferguson, Bannon outlines his manifesto for change and why it resonates with people around the world. "It doesn't matter how many liberal journalists come in here and say 'Oh this is a bunch of fascists, this is a bunch of Nazis, this is a bunch of racists.' This... is not going to stop."
For more than three decades Cambodia has been ruled by one man, Prime Minister Hun Sen, who came to power in the country's first democratic elections after the horror years of the Khmer Rouge. Australia played a key role in the peace deal that ended the bloody civil war, but the once bright hopes for democracy have long since faded. Ahead of this weekend's elections, the Hun Sen regime launched a ruthless crackdown on the political opposition and free press. On Monday, in her first story for Four Corners, reporter Sophie McNeill travels to Cambodia to confront the man whose political opponents have been imprisoned and assassinated in mysterious circumstances. While steadily cementing their grip on power, Hun Sen and his family and cronies are accused of amassing enormous wealth through a corrupt and nepotistic system. Four Corners has uncovered evidence of how the regime's wealth has been used to buy properties and businesses in Australia, where some of Hun Sen's relatives have established a base for building support, sometimes through threats and intimidation. Since 2014, Australia has granted the regime $40 million in additional aid, in return for taking some of Australia's unwanted refugees, and the Turnbull Government upgraded ties with Cambodia last year. While the US has begun moves to sanction the regime by freezing assets and blocking visas, international observers accuse the Australian Government of cosying up to Hun Sen. While hopes for democracy have disintegrated, China has moved to dramatically expand its presence and power in the country. As Hun Sen prepares to tighten his grip on power after this weekend's elections, Cambodia's democracy campaigners say they feel abandoned.

Four Corners: Champagne with Dictators

News and current affairs, Civics and citizenship

Years 11-12 News and current affairs, Civics and citizenship
45:19
For more than three decades Cambodia has been ruled by one man, Prime Minister Hun Sen, who came to power in the country's first democratic elections after the horror years of the Khmer Rouge. Australia played a key role in the peace deal that ended the bloody civil war, but the once bright hopes for democracy have long since faded. Ahead of this weekend's elections, the Hun Sen regime launched a ruthless crackdown on the political opposition and free press. On Monday, in her first story for Four Corners, reporter Sophie McNeill travels to Cambodia to confront the man whose political opponents have been imprisoned and assassinated in mysterious circumstances. While steadily cementing their grip on power, Hun Sen and his family and cronies are accused of amassing enormous wealth through a corrupt and nepotistic system. Four Corners has uncovered evidence of how the regime's wealth has been used to buy properties and businesses in Australia, where some of Hun Sen's relatives have established a base for building support, sometimes through threats and intimidation. Since 2014, Australia has granted the regime $40 million in additional aid, in return for taking some of Australia's unwanted refugees, and the Turnbull Government upgraded ties with Cambodia last year. While the US has begun moves to sanction the regime by freezing assets and blocking visas, international observers accuse the Australian Government of cosying up to Hun Sen. While hopes for democracy have disintegrated, China has moved to dramatically expand its presence and power in the country. As Hun Sen prepares to tighten his grip on power after this weekend's elections, Cambodia's democracy campaigners say they feel abandoned.
Jenny Brockie takes a look at chronic fatigue syndrome, what symptoms it has, and how people with the condition have managed it.
At 20 years old, Adele Clydesdale had just climbed Mount Kilimanjaro; she was starting her second year of university and playing in the Victorian Netball League.
So when she got glandular fever, she didn’t think much of it. She knew plenty of people who’d had it in high school and they always recovered quickly.
But even when tests results revealed the glandular fever was out of her system, Adele was still unwell and her symptoms were getting worse. She was increasingly fatigued, couldn’t string sentences together and had extreme body pain.
At six months, it was confirmed Adele had chronic fatigue syndrome, a diagnosis she found quite confronting.
Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is estimated to affect between 0.2-2 per cent of the population in Australia yet very little is known about this condition.
Otherwise known as Myalgic Encephalomyelitis or ME, it is an illness characterised by profound fatigue, not relieved by sleep or rest and worsened with activity.
Patients will commonly experience muscle and joint pain, impaired memory and concentration and gastrointestinal disorders. However, the most defining indicator of CFS is Post Exertional Malaise (PEM) - when a certain level of cognitive or physical exertion will exacerbate a patient’s symptoms.
There are currently no proven treatments for CFS which means many are left without answers. Ketra Wooding has been unwell for eight years and with such severe symptoms, she has been living in a nursing home for five of those years.

Insight: Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

News and current affairs, Intercultural understanding

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs, Intercultural understanding
51:56
Jenny Brockie takes a look at chronic fatigue syndrome, what symptoms it has, and how people with the condition have managed it. At 20 years old, Adele Clydesdale had just climbed Mount Kilimanjaro; she was starting her second year of university and playing in the Victorian Netball League. So when she got glandular fever, she didn’t think much of it. She knew plenty of people who’d had it in high school and they always recovered quickly. But even when tests results revealed the glandular fever was out of her system, Adele was still unwell and her symptoms were getting worse. She was increasingly fatigued, couldn’t string sentences together and had extreme body pain. At six months, it was confirmed Adele had chronic fatigue syndrome, a diagnosis she found quite confronting. Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is estimated to affect between 0.2-2 per cent of the population in Australia yet very little is known about this condition. Otherwise known as Myalgic Encephalomyelitis or ME, it is an illness characterised by profound fatigue, not relieved by sleep or rest and worsened with activity. Patients will commonly experience muscle and joint pain, impaired memory and concentration and gastrointestinal disorders. However, the most defining indicator of CFS is Post Exertional Malaise (PEM) - when a certain level of cognitive or physical exertion will exacerbate a patient’s symptoms. There are currently no proven treatments for CFS which means many are left without answers. Ketra Wooding has been unwell for eight years and with such severe symptoms, she has been living in a nursing home for five of those years.
The man who broke Watergate talks about Donald Trump
Donald Trump may have popularised the term 'fake news', but the wild nature of his presidency has also spawned an extraordinary series of insider accounts of his chaotic White House. The latest and most substantial of these is 'Fear' by veteran Washington reporter Bob Woodward.
Young women and injuries
The introduction of an AFL women's competition, the rise of the Matildas, and the increasing popularity of women's cricket all reflect a huge increase in the popularity of women's team sport. But with this surge has come a significant increase in serious knee injuries. Women are up to ten times more likely to rupture their anterior cruciate ligament than men, and Australia has the highest rate of knee reconstructions in the world.
Energy distributors push for a cap on solar power
More than six solar panels are installed across Australia every minute of every day as people try to tackle rising power prices. But the industry that owns Australia's poles and wires says all that power from the sun is a problem and it could destabilise the electricity grid. The solar industry disagrees, and it's preparing for a fight with the power networks.
Asian elephants under threat 
The Asian elephant is one of the world's most majestic animals. But now these gentle giants face a threat that could wipe them out completely … poachers who want their skin.

7.30: October 15, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
29:08
The man who broke Watergate talks about Donald Trump Donald Trump may have popularised the term 'fake news', but the wild nature of his presidency has also spawned an extraordinary series of insider accounts of his chaotic White House. The latest and most substantial of these is 'Fear' by veteran Washington reporter Bob Woodward. Young women and injuries The introduction of an AFL women's competition, the rise of the Matildas, and the increasing popularity of women's cricket all reflect a huge increase in the popularity of women's team sport. But with this surge has come a significant increase in serious knee injuries. Women are up to ten times more likely to rupture their anterior cruciate ligament than men, and Australia has the highest rate of knee reconstructions in the world. Energy distributors push for a cap on solar power More than six solar panels are installed across Australia every minute of every day as people try to tackle rising power prices. But the industry that owns Australia's poles and wires says all that power from the sun is a problem and it could destabilise the electricity grid. The solar industry disagrees, and it's preparing for a fight with the power networks. Asian elephants under threat The Asian elephant is one of the world's most majestic animals. But now these gentle giants face a threat that could wipe them out completely … poachers who want their skin.
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