Four Corners

Four Corners

Mind the Gap
ABC  |  May 28, 2018
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Mind the Gap

Four Corner’s investigation tells the story of your out of pocket medical expenses.

We’ve put you, the patient, at the centre of this investigation. Nine weeks ago we placed a call out, across ABC programs and social media, asking you to send us your bills. Hundreds of people across the country responded.

In this joint Four Corners investigation with Dr Norman Swan from RN’s Health Report, the program examines what’s driving these out of pocket expenses.

Millions of Australians fork out big money for private health insurance believing it will give them their choice of specialist and Rolls Royce service. Yet many, at a time of great personal crisis, are saddled with bills for treatment, leaving them thousands of dollars out of pocket and wondering why they bothered paying for insurance at all.

Many blame Medicare and the private health funds, but often the cause of out of pocket expenses lies elsewhere and this eye-opening program reveals some hard truths for patients.
For patients to get the best quality care for the money they pay, they need to rethink what high charging specialists actually deliver.

Mind the Gap

Four Corner’s investigation tells the story of your out of pocket medical expenses.

We’ve put you, the patient, at the centre of this investigation. Nine weeks ago we placed a call out, across ABC programs and social media, asking you to send us your bills. Hundreds of people across the country responded.

In this joint Four Corners investigation with Dr Norman Swan from RN’s Health Report, the program examines what’s driving these out of pocket expenses.

Millions of Australians fork out big money for private health insurance believing it will give them their choice of specialist and Rolls Royce service. Yet many, at a time of great personal crisis, are saddled with bills for treatment, leaving them thousands of dollars out of pocket and wondering why they bothered paying for insurance at all.

Many blame Medicare and the private health funds, but often the cause of out of pocket expenses lies elsewhere and this eye-opening program reveals some hard truths for patients.
For patients to get the best quality care for the money they pay, they need to rethink what high charging specialists actually deliver.

Steve Bannon’s new world disorder.
As the Liberal Party tries to piece itself back together after the chaos of last week, Four Corners brings you an interview with the man hoping to overthrow the entire political class.
"I think that Australia is going to be a hotbed of populism."
Steve Bannon put Donald Trump in the White House and rewrote the rules of modern politics along the way. Described as the most dangerous political operative in America, the strategist, renegade Republican and professional provocateur channelled the anger and disappointment of those who felt left behind by globalism to install Donald Trump as president.
"There's a lot of anger out there and I think that this anger can be harnessed."
Now, he's taking his cause to the world in a crusade to "save" western civilisation, as the leader of a global populist-nationalist movement. He calls it a revolution.
"Populism is about getting decision making away from a set of kind of global elites...and get it back to working class people."
In an age of upheaval, he sees opportunity. After playing a key role in Britain's Brexit campaign, he's been forging links with right wing nationalist groups across Europe, including the French National Front.
Australia is next on his radar. He's identified Australia as ripe for his brand of revolution and plans to bring it here.
"Australia is at the tip of the spear on this."
In an interview with Sarah Ferguson, Bannon outlines his manifesto for change and why it resonates with people around the world.
"It doesn't matter how many liberal journalists come in here and say 'Oh this is a bunch of fascists, this is a bunch of Nazis, this is a bunch of racists.' This... is not going to stop."

Four Corners: Populist Revolution

News and current affairs, Civics and citizenship

Years 11-12 News and current affairs, Civics and citizenship
39:12
Steve Bannon’s new world disorder. As the Liberal Party tries to piece itself back together after the chaos of last week, Four Corners brings you an interview with the man hoping to overthrow the entire political class. "I think that Australia is going to be a hotbed of populism." Steve Bannon put Donald Trump in the White House and rewrote the rules of modern politics along the way. Described as the most dangerous political operative in America, the strategist, renegade Republican and professional provocateur channelled the anger and disappointment of those who felt left behind by globalism to install Donald Trump as president. "There's a lot of anger out there and I think that this anger can be harnessed." Now, he's taking his cause to the world in a crusade to "save" western civilisation, as the leader of a global populist-nationalist movement. He calls it a revolution. "Populism is about getting decision making away from a set of kind of global elites...and get it back to working class people." In an age of upheaval, he sees opportunity. After playing a key role in Britain's Brexit campaign, he's been forging links with right wing nationalist groups across Europe, including the French National Front. Australia is next on his radar. He's identified Australia as ripe for his brand of revolution and plans to bring it here. "Australia is at the tip of the spear on this." In an interview with Sarah Ferguson, Bannon outlines his manifesto for change and why it resonates with people around the world. "It doesn't matter how many liberal journalists come in here and say 'Oh this is a bunch of fascists, this is a bunch of Nazis, this is a bunch of racists.' This... is not going to stop."
For more than three decades Cambodia has been ruled by one man, Prime Minister Hun Sen, who came to power in the country's first democratic elections after the horror years of the Khmer Rouge. Australia played a key role in the peace deal that ended the bloody civil war, but the once bright hopes for democracy have long since faded. Ahead of this weekend's elections, the Hun Sen regime launched a ruthless crackdown on the political opposition and free press. On Monday, in her first story for Four Corners, reporter Sophie McNeill travels to Cambodia to confront the man whose political opponents have been imprisoned and assassinated in mysterious circumstances. While steadily cementing their grip on power, Hun Sen and his family and cronies are accused of amassing enormous wealth through a corrupt and nepotistic system. Four Corners has uncovered evidence of how the regime's wealth has been used to buy properties and businesses in Australia, where some of Hun Sen's relatives have established a base for building support, sometimes through threats and intimidation. Since 2014, Australia has granted the regime $40 million in additional aid, in return for taking some of Australia's unwanted refugees, and the Turnbull Government upgraded ties with Cambodia last year. While the US has begun moves to sanction the regime by freezing assets and blocking visas, international observers accuse the Australian Government of cosying up to Hun Sen. While hopes for democracy have disintegrated, China has moved to dramatically expand its presence and power in the country. As Hun Sen prepares to tighten his grip on power after this weekend's elections, Cambodia's democracy campaigners say they feel abandoned.

Four Corners: Champagne with Dictators

News and current affairs, Civics and citizenship

Years 11-12 News and current affairs, Civics and citizenship
45:19
For more than three decades Cambodia has been ruled by one man, Prime Minister Hun Sen, who came to power in the country's first democratic elections after the horror years of the Khmer Rouge. Australia played a key role in the peace deal that ended the bloody civil war, but the once bright hopes for democracy have long since faded. Ahead of this weekend's elections, the Hun Sen regime launched a ruthless crackdown on the political opposition and free press. On Monday, in her first story for Four Corners, reporter Sophie McNeill travels to Cambodia to confront the man whose political opponents have been imprisoned and assassinated in mysterious circumstances. While steadily cementing their grip on power, Hun Sen and his family and cronies are accused of amassing enormous wealth through a corrupt and nepotistic system. Four Corners has uncovered evidence of how the regime's wealth has been used to buy properties and businesses in Australia, where some of Hun Sen's relatives have established a base for building support, sometimes through threats and intimidation. Since 2014, Australia has granted the regime $40 million in additional aid, in return for taking some of Australia's unwanted refugees, and the Turnbull Government upgraded ties with Cambodia last year. While the US has begun moves to sanction the regime by freezing assets and blocking visas, international observers accuse the Australian Government of cosying up to Hun Sen. While hopes for democracy have disintegrated, China has moved to dramatically expand its presence and power in the country. As Hun Sen prepares to tighten his grip on power after this weekend's elections, Cambodia's democracy campaigners say they feel abandoned.
How do you keep people safe from dog attacks?
The death of a toddler last month has reignited the debate about how to keep people safe from dogs. The RSPCA says training and education is the answer, but others want aggressive dogs banned.
 
Laura Tingle on the $4.5bn extra funding for Catholic and independent schools
Prime Minister Scott Morrison has announced $4.5 billion in extra funding for Catholic and independent schools.
 
Behind the lens of Parliament's prize photographer
This year, for the first time in history, the press gallery journalist of the year award went to a photographer, Alex Ellinghausen. He works for the Sydney Morning Herald and The Age, and while you may not know his name the chances are you'll recognise his work - capturing politicians at their best, their worst and their most vulnerable.
 
The battle for control of powerlifting in Australia
Parliament house isn't the only place where you'll find politics. Pretty much any organisation, no matter how big or small, will at some stage become captive to people jockeying for power. The sport of powerlifting in Australia is a case in point, with two local federations vying for control - and the athletes caught in the middle.
 
Roadies, a look at life on the road
Behind every world-conquering band is a road crew that transports them from gig to gig, ensures they look and sound amazing, and literally works around the clock to keep the show on the road. Music writer Stuart Coupe's latest book, Roadies – The Secret History of Australian Rock'n'Roll, is a fascinating look at the often hidden side of the music business.

7.30: September 20, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
31:53
How do you keep people safe from dog attacks? The death of a toddler last month has reignited the debate about how to keep people safe from dogs. The RSPCA says training and education is the answer, but others want aggressive dogs banned. Laura Tingle on the $4.5bn extra funding for Catholic and independent schools Prime Minister Scott Morrison has announced $4.5 billion in extra funding for Catholic and independent schools. Behind the lens of Parliament's prize photographer This year, for the first time in history, the press gallery journalist of the year award went to a photographer, Alex Ellinghausen. He works for the Sydney Morning Herald and The Age, and while you may not know his name the chances are you'll recognise his work - capturing politicians at their best, their worst and their most vulnerable. The battle for control of powerlifting in Australia Parliament house isn't the only place where you'll find politics. Pretty much any organisation, no matter how big or small, will at some stage become captive to people jockeying for power. The sport of powerlifting in Australia is a case in point, with two local federations vying for control - and the athletes caught in the middle. Roadies, a look at life on the road Behind every world-conquering band is a road crew that transports them from gig to gig, ensures they look and sound amazing, and literally works around the clock to keep the show on the road. Music writer Stuart Coupe's latest book, Roadies – The Secret History of Australian Rock'n'Roll, is a fascinating look at the often hidden side of the music business.
Authorities fear copy-cat tampering in fruit contamination disaster
Since the story strawberry tampering broke more than 100 reports of contaminated fruit have been made around the country, sparking fears of copy-cat tampering. Authorities are scrambling to manage this slow-moving disaster as they try to limit the damage to an industry worth almost half a billion dollars.
 
Why are female Liberal MPs quitting Federal politics?
A number of female Liberal MPs have spoken out against internal party dynamics, while also announcing they won’t recontest the next election. But Prime Minister Scott Morrison insisting there is not a behaviour problem in Canberra.
 
Christian Porter discusses strawberry tampering and sexism in politics
Federal Attorney General, Christian Porter, talks to 7.30 about news laws introduced to counter the growing strawberry tampering crisis, and whether the Liberal Party has a problem with women.
 
Marine archaeologists may have discovered the wreck of the Endeavour
Historian David Hunt explains why the discovery of Capt. James Cook's ship, HMS Endeavour, would be an important moment in Australia's history.
 
Meet Alec Knight, the first Australian male to join the New York City Ballet
Alec Knight was just 17 when he moved to New York after being offered a coveted apprenticeship with the New York City Ballet. That was five years ago. Now he's the first Australian male to be given a contract with the prestigious ballet company.

7.30: September 19, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
30:05
Authorities fear copy-cat tampering in fruit contamination disaster Since the story strawberry tampering broke more than 100 reports of contaminated fruit have been made around the country, sparking fears of copy-cat tampering. Authorities are scrambling to manage this slow-moving disaster as they try to limit the damage to an industry worth almost half a billion dollars. Why are female Liberal MPs quitting Federal politics? A number of female Liberal MPs have spoken out against internal party dynamics, while also announcing they won’t recontest the next election. But Prime Minister Scott Morrison insisting there is not a behaviour problem in Canberra. Christian Porter discusses strawberry tampering and sexism in politics Federal Attorney General, Christian Porter, talks to 7.30 about news laws introduced to counter the growing strawberry tampering crisis, and whether the Liberal Party has a problem with women. Marine archaeologists may have discovered the wreck of the Endeavour Historian David Hunt explains why the discovery of Capt. James Cook's ship, HMS Endeavour, would be an important moment in Australia's history. Meet Alec Knight, the first Australian male to join the New York City Ballet Alec Knight was just 17 when he moved to New York after being offered a coveted apprenticeship with the New York City Ballet. That was five years ago. Now he's the first Australian male to be given a contract with the prestigious ballet company.
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