Four Corners

Four Corners

May 7, 2018
ABC  |  May 7, 2018
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The events of that night in Kings Cross would change Saxon Mullins life forever.The young man she accused of raping her, on her hands and knees in the gravel in a laneway, pleaded not guilty, insisting their sexual encounter had been consensual.The incident led to a gruelling legal battle that went for almost five years, including two trials and two appeals. Eventually the accused man, Luke Lazarus, the son of a nightclub owner, walked free, acquitted of rape.
The case has had devastating consequences for all involved, and some of the details of the story are hard to hear. But it's inspired a deep questioning of what exactly is consent to sex, how does a woman indicate it, and how does a man ensure that he has it? And is the law adequate to address these questions? Saxon Mullins' identity has been protected until now. But she's given up her anonymity to tell her story to Four Corners in the hope it will lead to change. The reporter is Louise Milligan.

The events of that night in Kings Cross would change Saxon Mullins life forever.The young man she accused of raping her, on her hands and knees in the gravel in a laneway, pleaded not guilty, insisting their sexual encounter had been consensual.The incident led to a gruelling legal battle that went for almost five years, including two trials and two appeals. Eventually the accused man, Luke Lazarus, the son of a nightclub owner, walked free, acquitted of rape.
The case has had devastating consequences for all involved, and some of the details of the story are hard to hear. But it's inspired a deep questioning of what exactly is consent to sex, how does a woman indicate it, and how does a man ensure that he has it? And is the law adequate to address these questions? Saxon Mullins' identity has been protected until now. But she's given up her anonymity to tell her story to Four Corners in the hope it will lead to change. The reporter is Louise Milligan.

For more than three decades Cambodia has been ruled by one man, Prime Minister Hun Sen, who came to power in the country's first democratic elections after the horror years of the Khmer Rouge. Australia played a key role in the peace deal that ended the bloody civil war, but the once bright hopes for democracy have long since faded. Ahead of this weekend's elections, the Hun Sen regime launched a ruthless crackdown on the political opposition and free press. On Monday, in her first story for Four Corners, reporter Sophie McNeill travels to Cambodia to confront the man whose political opponents have been imprisoned and assassinated in mysterious circumstances. While steadily cementing their grip on power, Hun Sen and his family and cronies are accused of amassing enormous wealth through a corrupt and nepotistic system. Four Corners has uncovered evidence of how the regime's wealth has been used to buy properties and businesses in Australia, where some of Hun Sen's relatives have established a base for building support, sometimes through threats and intimidation. Since 2014, Australia has granted the regime $40 million in additional aid, in return for taking some of Australia's unwanted refugees, and the Turnbull Government upgraded ties with Cambodia last year. While the US has begun moves to sanction the regime by freezing assets and blocking visas, international observers accuse the Australian Government of cosying up to Hun Sen. While hopes for democracy have disintegrated, China has moved to dramatically expand its presence and power in the country. As Hun Sen prepares to tighten his grip on power after this weekend's elections, Cambodia's democracy campaigners say they feel abandoned.

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For more than three decades Cambodia has been ruled by one man, Prime Minister Hun Sen, who came to power in the country's first democratic elections after the horror years of the Khmer Rouge. Australia played a key role in the peace deal that ended the bloody civil war, but the once bright hopes for democracy have long since faded. Ahead of this weekend's elections, the Hun Sen regime launched a ruthless crackdown on the political opposition and free press. On Monday, in her first story for Four Corners, reporter Sophie McNeill travels to Cambodia to confront the man whose political opponents have been imprisoned and assassinated in mysterious circumstances. While steadily cementing their grip on power, Hun Sen and his family and cronies are accused of amassing enormous wealth through a corrupt and nepotistic system. Four Corners has uncovered evidence of how the regime's wealth has been used to buy properties and businesses in Australia, where some of Hun Sen's relatives have established a base for building support, sometimes through threats and intimidation. Since 2014, Australia has granted the regime $40 million in additional aid, in return for taking some of Australia's unwanted refugees, and the Turnbull Government upgraded ties with Cambodia last year. While the US has begun moves to sanction the regime by freezing assets and blocking visas, international observers accuse the Australian Government of cosying up to Hun Sen. While hopes for democracy have disintegrated, China has moved to dramatically expand its presence and power in the country. As Hun Sen prepares to tighten his grip on power after this weekend's elections, Cambodia's democracy campaigners say they feel abandoned.
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