Celebrating Chinese New Year

Community clip

Celebrating Chinese New Year

Clip from For The Juniors  |  Season 1  |  Episode 4  |  ABC1  |  November 24, 2009

See how Chinese New Year is celebrated, from dumplings to dragons and drums.

See how Chinese New Year is celebrated, from dumplings to dragons and drums.

Community clip
This program explores some historical and modern day work roles for horses. Four different horses are observed working with their handlers. The programs look at the physical and mental characteristics of horses that help them in their work and the way handlers value their horses and communicate with them. 

Through the use of historic footage and photos the program looks at life before cars and shows why some ways of using working horses have changed from the past to the present day and that horses are still bettter than machines for some forms of work. 

The program also explains and demonstrates some basic safety rules that should be observed when around horses. 

The lives of working animals are explored in these two episodes. Programs highlight the special features of animals that can make them more suited to certain tasks than people or machines and that, like all good working relationships, these ones are based on clear communication and mutual respect. 

For the Juniors, for students aged 6-8 years, aims to stimulate children's curiosity and imagination, widen their horizons and encourage them to explore their environment, present enjoyable experiences which relate broadly to the lives and interests of the children and raise issues. 

Each series is arranged in groups of programs relating to a particular theme.

For the Juniors: Working Animals - Working Horses

History, Science, Health and PE, Design and technologies, Sustainability, Intercultural Understanding

Years F, 1-2 History, Science, Health and PE, Design and technologies, Sustainability, Intercultural Understanding
15:46
This program explores some historical and modern day work roles for horses. Four different horses are observed working with their handlers. The programs look at the physical and mental characteristics of horses that help them in their work and the way handlers value their horses and communicate with them. Through the use of historic footage and photos the program looks at life before cars and shows why some ways of using working horses have changed from the past to the present day and that horses are still bettter than machines for some forms of work. The program also explains and demonstrates some basic safety rules that should be observed when around horses. The lives of working animals are explored in these two episodes. Programs highlight the special features of animals that can make them more suited to certain tasks than people or machines and that, like all good working relationships, these ones are based on clear communication and mutual respect. For the Juniors, for students aged 6-8 years, aims to stimulate children's curiosity and imagination, widen their horizons and encourage them to explore their environment, present enjoyable experiences which relate broadly to the lives and interests of the children and raise issues. Each series is arranged in groups of programs relating to a particular theme.
Director Claude Gonzalez had always been interested in Sydney folklore and this particular story from Sydney's recent past had never, he believed, been fully explored. "Over the years I'd seen a lot of news reports about the incident but it wasn't until I actually met one of the survivors from the Kuttabul, Neil Roberts, that my interest was sparked." This program interviews remaining survivors of the mission - both Australian and Japanese - as well as family members of the Japanese submariners. The film also uses archival footage to recall the events of that night. In Japan the subject of war is taboo. Rarely do films dealing with these issues have the opportunity to present the other side of the story, and over the last 63 years, no-one has filmed or presented the Japanese perspective of the attack. Gonzalez draws out stories from the interviewees as to what their involvement was on that night. He was struck by how much this event meant to them at the time and how it has stayed with them over the years. "They had all taken part in an event that at the time was quickly swept under the carpet but they were left with strong feelings that have never been resolved." One of the little-known incidences that occurred after the attack was the funeral of the dead Japanese submariners on Tuesday, June 9, 1941. The Australian military at the time wanted to create an act of goodwill that would possibly give Australian POWs some leniency with their captors in Changi and Burma. Today, some of the Japanese servicemen regard Australia as a very compassionate nation that showed great respect to their war dead at a time when that sort of act was unthinkable.

Sydney at War

history, Modern history, Civics and citizenship, Asia and Australia

Years 9-10, 11-12 history, Modern history, Civics and citizenship, Asia and Australia
52:01
Director Claude Gonzalez had always been interested in Sydney folklore and this particular story from Sydney's recent past had never, he believed, been fully explored. "Over the years I'd seen a lot of news reports about the incident but it wasn't until I actually met one of the survivors from the Kuttabul, Neil Roberts, that my interest was sparked." This program interviews remaining survivors of the mission - both Australian and Japanese - as well as family members of the Japanese submariners. The film also uses archival footage to recall the events of that night. In Japan the subject of war is taboo. Rarely do films dealing with these issues have the opportunity to present the other side of the story, and over the last 63 years, no-one has filmed or presented the Japanese perspective of the attack. Gonzalez draws out stories from the interviewees as to what their involvement was on that night. He was struck by how much this event meant to them at the time and how it has stayed with them over the years. "They had all taken part in an event that at the time was quickly swept under the carpet but they were left with strong feelings that have never been resolved." One of the little-known incidences that occurred after the attack was the funeral of the dead Japanese submariners on Tuesday, June 9, 1941. The Australian military at the time wanted to create an act of goodwill that would possibly give Australian POWs some leniency with their captors in Changi and Burma. Today, some of the Japanese servicemen regard Australia as a very compassionate nation that showed great respect to their war dead at a time when that sort of act was unthinkable.
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