David Suchet

David Suchet

In The Footsteps Of St Paul
Episode 2  |  SBS  |  September 21, 2012

Actor David Suchet sets out on a personal journey around the Mediterranean to uncover the story of a man he has longed to play - the biblical Saint Paul. Along the way, Suchet visits ancient and modern locations, interviews expert witnesses and deciphers new evidence from the latest archaeological research.

Actor David Suchet sets out on a personal journey around the Mediterranean to uncover the story of a man he has longed to play - the biblical Saint Paul. Along the way, Suchet visits ancient and modern locations, interviews expert witnesses and deciphers new evidence from the latest archaeological research.

It's not clear if the process against the Templars was initiated by the Inquisition on the basis of suspected heresy or if the Inquisition itself was exploited by the king of France, Philip the Fair, who wanted the knights' wealth. But in 1307 the King ordered the arrest of all Knights Templar across Europe and the seizure of all their assets. Some fled to South West France, some to Italy and some to Scotland, and units of the King's army were dispatched to hunt them down and kill them if necessary. The Templars had simply become too powerful, too rich and too much of a threat to the crown. There were also rumours of occult worship and bizarre rituals. Like the Templars, the Cathars were mostly in the South of France, in cities like Toulouse. They appear to have been originally founded by some soldiers from the Second Crusade, who, on their way back, were converted by a Bulgarian sect, the Bogomils. The Cathars main heresy was their belief in dualism, the evil God created the materialistic world and the good God created the spiritual world. Therefore, Cathars preached poverty, chastity, modesty and all those values which in their view helped people to detach themselves from materialism. To the Church in Rome, this was simply not acceptable. The Cathars were seen as a huge threat to Rome and they sent their armies to Southern France to destroy them.

Inquisition: Templars And Cathars

History, Religious studies, Ethical understanding

Years 11-12 History, Religious studies, Ethical understanding
43:34
It's not clear if the process against the Templars was initiated by the Inquisition on the basis of suspected heresy or if the Inquisition itself was exploited by the king of France, Philip the Fair, who wanted the knights' wealth. But in 1307 the King ordered the arrest of all Knights Templar across Europe and the seizure of all their assets. Some fled to South West France, some to Italy and some to Scotland, and units of the King's army were dispatched to hunt them down and kill them if necessary. The Templars had simply become too powerful, too rich and too much of a threat to the crown. There were also rumours of occult worship and bizarre rituals. Like the Templars, the Cathars were mostly in the South of France, in cities like Toulouse. They appear to have been originally founded by some soldiers from the Second Crusade, who, on their way back, were converted by a Bulgarian sect, the Bogomils. The Cathars main heresy was their belief in dualism, the evil God created the materialistic world and the good God created the spiritual world. Therefore, Cathars preached poverty, chastity, modesty and all those values which in their view helped people to detach themselves from materialism. To the Church in Rome, this was simply not acceptable. The Cathars were seen as a huge threat to Rome and they sent their armies to Southern France to destroy them.
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