Dateline

Dateline

Swapped: From Manus to Missouri
SBS  |  February 20, 2018
Classification: Not Classified Classification: Not Classified
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How do you start a new life in a new country, after years in immigration detention? Dateline meets the refugees swapped in a deal between Australia and the US. What’s it like arriving in Donald Trump’s America after four years on Manus Island? This week on Dateline, we meet two refugees sent to the US in deal with the Australian government – who are now making lives for themselves after experiencing years of violence in their country of birth and the trauma of immigration detention.

How do you start a new life in a new country, after years in immigration detention? Dateline meets the refugees swapped in a deal between Australia and the US. What’s it like arriving in Donald Trump’s America after four years on Manus Island? This week on Dateline, we meet two refugees sent to the US in deal with the Australian government – who are now making lives for themselves after experiencing years of violence in their country of birth and the trauma of immigration detention.

This week on Dateline, we meet the young journalists trying to unite Rio de Janeiro’s favelas through a news site, started by a local when he was just 11 years old.
When the police come ‘pow, pow, pow’. You get down. Everyone runs into the corridors!”
It’s a tough pill to swallow, but this is the every day reality for children who go to school in Rio de Janeiro’s favelas.
With members from rival drug gangs manning every street corner, and a military campaign adamant on stamping out drug related violence, navigating these slums has become a matter of life and death for most residents. In 2017 alone, 6,731 people lost their lives to violent crimes in Rio.
13 years ago, Rene Silva founded his community newspaper, Voz das Comunidades (VOZ). Once a small-time paper operating from Rene’s home, the young journalists working for VOZ now have deep ties in local communities, and often serve as a point of reference for the larger Brazilian press.
Kitted out in VOZ polos, the reporters use their smartphones and social media to give voice to parents like Fabio and Paloma Morre, who lost their son, Benjamin, to the crossfire between local police and drug traffickers. He was just shy of two years old.
His father, Fabio, waves his phone – with a video of a toddler laughing playing on the screen - at the young journalist interviewing him.
“This is one of the last pictures I took with him – this is a video of him dancing!”
It’s a scene journalist Luana Melo has seen all too many times before.
“It’s important for us to tell the story of the day Benjamin died. So these incidents won’t happen inside the favelas, with such violence.”

Dateline: Children Caught in the Crossfire

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
25:07
This week on Dateline, we meet the young journalists trying to unite Rio de Janeiro’s favelas through a news site, started by a local when he was just 11 years old. When the police come ‘pow, pow, pow’. You get down. Everyone runs into the corridors!” It’s a tough pill to swallow, but this is the every day reality for children who go to school in Rio de Janeiro’s favelas. With members from rival drug gangs manning every street corner, and a military campaign adamant on stamping out drug related violence, navigating these slums has become a matter of life and death for most residents. In 2017 alone, 6,731 people lost their lives to violent crimes in Rio. 13 years ago, Rene Silva founded his community newspaper, Voz das Comunidades (VOZ). Once a small-time paper operating from Rene’s home, the young journalists working for VOZ now have deep ties in local communities, and often serve as a point of reference for the larger Brazilian press. Kitted out in VOZ polos, the reporters use their smartphones and social media to give voice to parents like Fabio and Paloma Morre, who lost their son, Benjamin, to the crossfire between local police and drug traffickers. He was just shy of two years old. His father, Fabio, waves his phone – with a video of a toddler laughing playing on the screen - at the young journalist interviewing him. “This is one of the last pictures I took with him – this is a video of him dancing!” It’s a scene journalist Luana Melo has seen all too many times before. “It’s important for us to tell the story of the day Benjamin died. So these incidents won’t happen inside the favelas, with such violence.”
You might not have picked it, but reporter Steve Chao has never been more excited about poo. Panda poo that is.
It’s a sign one of China's rare wild pandas could be close by.  
Few animals have become as synonymous with wildlife conservation as the giant panda, also becoming one of China’s most famous symbols for peace and diplomacy along the way. Despite this, wildlife experts are saying the country’s approach to these furry animals is heading in the wrong direction.  On Dateline, we head both into the wild and zoos to see how their future looks. 
At the Yabuli Ski Resort in Northern China, the animals walk on concrete floors, and entertain themselves amongst fake trees and plastic playgrounds. Cameras flash away at them from the other side of their glass enclosures – a far cry from their natural homes.
Zookeeper Yan Yongbin says the exhibits play a vital part in educating visitors on the lifestyles of these elusive creatures.
While time and effort is being put into captive breeding, conservationists believe more emphasis should be placed on protecting the natural habitats of wild pandas. Acres of forest are dwindling rapidly, with both housing and mining developments encroaching on pandas’ natural territories. Today, just under 2000 pandas remain in the wild. 
Dateline met Hi Liwen, one man dedicating his life to staying on the trail of wild pandas to ensure they thrive in their natural environment.

Dateline: Saving China's Pandas

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
26:15
You might not have picked it, but reporter Steve Chao has never been more excited about poo. Panda poo that is. It’s a sign one of China's rare wild pandas could be close by. Few animals have become as synonymous with wildlife conservation as the giant panda, also becoming one of China’s most famous symbols for peace and diplomacy along the way. Despite this, wildlife experts are saying the country’s approach to these furry animals is heading in the wrong direction. On Dateline, we head both into the wild and zoos to see how their future looks. At the Yabuli Ski Resort in Northern China, the animals walk on concrete floors, and entertain themselves amongst fake trees and plastic playgrounds. Cameras flash away at them from the other side of their glass enclosures – a far cry from their natural homes. Zookeeper Yan Yongbin says the exhibits play a vital part in educating visitors on the lifestyles of these elusive creatures. While time and effort is being put into captive breeding, conservationists believe more emphasis should be placed on protecting the natural habitats of wild pandas. Acres of forest are dwindling rapidly, with both housing and mining developments encroaching on pandas’ natural territories. Today, just under 2000 pandas remain in the wild. Dateline met Hi Liwen, one man dedicating his life to staying on the trail of wild pandas to ensure they thrive in their natural environment.
In Ireland, women can go to jail for getting an abortion, even in cases of rape. As the country votes on whether to change its conservative abortion laws, we take the pulse of a nation divided down the middle.
On May 25, Ireland heading to the polls in a landmark referendum that could finally overturn its abortion laws.
Enshrined in the country's constitution is the protection of the unborn’s right to life – but at what cost?
Dateline reporter Shaunagh Connaire goes to the heart of the referendum debate to meet women and families from both sides of a bitterly divisive issue.
Hitting the streets of Waterford, Shaunagh meets a new generation of young, grassroots campaigners called the Youth Defence who are fighting hard to keep Ireland abortion free. 
“This is a human rights issue," explains Christine Darcy, a trainee teacher working for Youth Defence.
"We have constitutional protection of the unborn, like an equal right to life for the mother and the baby. Why would we take that out of our constitution?"
For many Irish women, the current laws are driving them to extreme lengths - In 2016, 3,265 Irish women travelled to the UK to get an abortion.
Due to the expense, and lack of local support, most make the trip in one day, risking their health in the process. 
"I was given a card with a number on it in order to protect your identity," says one such woman Cathy, who paid £400 for her surgical abortion in a Manchester clinic.
“It’s really heartbreaking to know that you are almost being exported; that this country doesn’t want to know about your problems or your issues.”

Dateline: Ireland's Abortion Debate

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
26:02
In Ireland, women can go to jail for getting an abortion, even in cases of rape. As the country votes on whether to change its conservative abortion laws, we take the pulse of a nation divided down the middle. On May 25, Ireland heading to the polls in a landmark referendum that could finally overturn its abortion laws. Enshrined in the country's constitution is the protection of the unborn’s right to life – but at what cost? Dateline reporter Shaunagh Connaire goes to the heart of the referendum debate to meet women and families from both sides of a bitterly divisive issue. Hitting the streets of Waterford, Shaunagh meets a new generation of young, grassroots campaigners called the Youth Defence who are fighting hard to keep Ireland abortion free. “This is a human rights issue," explains Christine Darcy, a trainee teacher working for Youth Defence. "We have constitutional protection of the unborn, like an equal right to life for the mother and the baby. Why would we take that out of our constitution?" For many Irish women, the current laws are driving them to extreme lengths - In 2016, 3,265 Irish women travelled to the UK to get an abortion. Due to the expense, and lack of local support, most make the trip in one day, risking their health in the process. "I was given a card with a number on it in order to protect your identity," says one such woman Cathy, who paid £400 for her surgical abortion in a Manchester clinic. “It’s really heartbreaking to know that you are almost being exported; that this country doesn’t want to know about your problems or your issues.”
A special investigation into the mass exodus of Rohingya Muslims from Myanmar. The film examines evidence that Myanmar's security forces used systematic rape and terror tactics to expel hundreds of thousands of Rohingya from the country.
Since security forces began a violent campaign in August 2017, up to 700,000 people have fled their homes to travel across the Myanmar border to nearby Bangladesh.
Thousands of civilians, including children, are thought to have been killed, in a story of systematic discrimination, state-sanctioned violence and, ultimately, mass murder.
In this special hour-long Dateline film, reporter Evan Williams hears first-hand about brutal killings and attacks on Myanmar's persecuted Rohingya Muslim population - and looks at whether Myanmar’s leaders, including Nobel Peace Prize laureate Aung San Suu Kyi, should be held accountable for these atrocities.
“She had gone from a human rights heroine, a beacon of democracy, to a politician catering to the military, wanting the military to support her,” says former US Ambassador to the United Nations, Bill Richardson.
Aung San Suu Kyi rejects the criticism and says that the military is simply hunting terrorists, but a network of Rohingya activists were secretly filming what was really happening, risking their lives in the process.Their ground breaking accounts of video evidence of several unknown massacres, provides Dateline with the first proper look at whether the killing of civilians could be genocide.

Dateline: Myanmar's Killing Fields

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
51:58
A special investigation into the mass exodus of Rohingya Muslims from Myanmar. The film examines evidence that Myanmar's security forces used systematic rape and terror tactics to expel hundreds of thousands of Rohingya from the country. Since security forces began a violent campaign in August 2017, up to 700,000 people have fled their homes to travel across the Myanmar border to nearby Bangladesh. Thousands of civilians, including children, are thought to have been killed, in a story of systematic discrimination, state-sanctioned violence and, ultimately, mass murder. In this special hour-long Dateline film, reporter Evan Williams hears first-hand about brutal killings and attacks on Myanmar's persecuted Rohingya Muslim population - and looks at whether Myanmar’s leaders, including Nobel Peace Prize laureate Aung San Suu Kyi, should be held accountable for these atrocities. “She had gone from a human rights heroine, a beacon of democracy, to a politician catering to the military, wanting the military to support her,” says former US Ambassador to the United Nations, Bill Richardson. Aung San Suu Kyi rejects the criticism and says that the military is simply hunting terrorists, but a network of Rohingya activists were secretly filming what was really happening, risking their lives in the process.Their ground breaking accounts of video evidence of several unknown massacres, provides Dateline with the first proper look at whether the killing of civilians could be genocide.
Gamble of life
Soon after meeting and falling in love, Andrew and Olivia Densley agreed they both adored kids and wanted a large family. They got married and got on with their dream. But after having their fourth child they received terrible news. Their third child, a son, had a genetic immune deficiency disease which looked likely to kill him. Just when all seemed lost though, he was saved by a long-shot miracle. His little brother, the couple’s fourth child, was a match as a bone marrow donor. But as Tom Steinfort reports, at this point the story gets even more complicated. While Andrew and Olivia knew the substantial risks of having more children, it didn’t stop them. Olivia fell pregnant with a fifth child who was also born with the usually fatal disease. But having rolled the dice and lost, the couple refused to give up. It has taken several years and a hundred thousand dollars, but they’ve managed to engineer another extraordinary solution.
A magpie called Penguin
Somewhere, flying around the northern beaches of Sydney, is a magpie called Penguin who often thinks she’s a human. And if that’s not incredible enough, this amazing bird has another claim to fame – she’s a lifesaver. Penguin taught Sam Bloom, a mother of three, how to live again after she fell from a balcony, broke her back and became a paraplegic. It’s a truly inspiring tale that not surprisingly will also soon be a Hollywood movie

60 Minutes: Gamble of life/ A Magpie called Penguin

News and current affairs

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs
48:40
Gamble of life Soon after meeting and falling in love, Andrew and Olivia Densley agreed they both adored kids and wanted a large family. They got married and got on with their dream. But after having their fourth child they received terrible news. Their third child, a son, had a genetic immune deficiency disease which looked likely to kill him. Just when all seemed lost though, he was saved by a long-shot miracle. His little brother, the couple’s fourth child, was a match as a bone marrow donor. But as Tom Steinfort reports, at this point the story gets even more complicated. While Andrew and Olivia knew the substantial risks of having more children, it didn’t stop them. Olivia fell pregnant with a fifth child who was also born with the usually fatal disease. But having rolled the dice and lost, the couple refused to give up. It has taken several years and a hundred thousand dollars, but they’ve managed to engineer another extraordinary solution. A magpie called Penguin Somewhere, flying around the northern beaches of Sydney, is a magpie called Penguin who often thinks she’s a human. And if that’s not incredible enough, this amazing bird has another claim to fame – she’s a lifesaver. Penguin taught Sam Bloom, a mother of three, how to live again after she fell from a balcony, broke her back and became a paraplegic. It’s a truly inspiring tale that not surprisingly will also soon be a Hollywood movie
Rural News
A look at rural and regional issues making the news this week.
Heywire: Muriel
Muriel Hunter had a tragic start to life and struggled in school, but now she's fulfilling her dream
Defying the Drought
A large part of eastern Australia is drought declared, and the big dry is hitting farmers and communities hard. But some farmers seem to be defying the drought. Marty McCarthy hits the road to meet them.
Hall of Fame
The rural press club honour is awarded to Queensland-based journalists who have made a significant contribution to the profession for more than 20 years and have helped support the next generation of rural journalists. Pip has been a reporter on the ABC’s flagship rural current affairs program Landline for the past 25 years and its host since 2012.
Open Sesame
Farmers and scientists in central Queensland have just trialled the country’s first commercial crop of black sesame seed and early results are showing great potential.
Markets Report
Market activity and analysis with Kerry Lonergan.
Farm Tech
Farmers have partnered with programmers, engineers and inventors to help make farming more efficient. It’s part of a University ‘Tech-Connect’ program and together they’ve come up with some very creative solutions to some everyday on-farm problems.

Landline: August 12, 2018

Business and economics, Earth and environment, Sustainability, News and current affairs

Years 9-10, 11-12 Business and economics, Earth and environment, Sustainability, News and current affairs
57:15
Rural News A look at rural and regional issues making the news this week. Heywire: Muriel Muriel Hunter had a tragic start to life and struggled in school, but now she's fulfilling her dream Defying the Drought A large part of eastern Australia is drought declared, and the big dry is hitting farmers and communities hard. But some farmers seem to be defying the drought. Marty McCarthy hits the road to meet them. Hall of Fame The rural press club honour is awarded to Queensland-based journalists who have made a significant contribution to the profession for more than 20 years and have helped support the next generation of rural journalists. Pip has been a reporter on the ABC’s flagship rural current affairs program Landline for the past 25 years and its host since 2012. Open Sesame Farmers and scientists in central Queensland have just trialled the country’s first commercial crop of black sesame seed and early results are showing great potential. Markets Report Market activity and analysis with Kerry Lonergan. Farm Tech Farmers have partnered with programmers, engineers and inventors to help make farming more efficient. It’s part of a University ‘Tech-Connect’ program and together they’ve come up with some very creative solutions to some everyday on-farm problems.
From Fortnite to Candy Crush, for many people video games are a source of entertainment, relaxation, a chance to build friendships, or a career.
But for a minority, games can be a problem.
With 67 per cent of Australians playing video games, and 97 per cent of households with children having video games, Insight asks, “how much is too much? When does video gaming stop being fun?”
Laurie Darby represents the fastest growing segment of the population new to games - the over 65s. Retired and living alone, she tells Jenny Brockie that she checks in daily with her family and friends by playing word games on her mobile.
Zion, 11, loves playing Fortnite with his friends, and his mother, Rosie, works hard to set boundaries around his gaming. “He has other responsibilities he has to do first, like his homework, and walking and picking up after the dog,” she explains.
For Taei Aluni and Maddelin Walster, video games are a source of tension. Taei would keep playing if he was allowed to, but Maddelin says he’s “like a vacant partner” when he’s on the games, and it’s affecting their family.
In the wake of the World Health Organisation including “gaming disorder” in its latest International Classification of Diseases, Insight considers whether or not it’s the personality of the gamer, or features built into the games themselves, which sees some people become hooked, while others manage to keep it just for fun.

Insight: Game On

News and current affairs, Intercultural understanding

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs, Intercultural understanding
52:16
From Fortnite to Candy Crush, for many people video games are a source of entertainment, relaxation, a chance to build friendships, or a career. But for a minority, games can be a problem. With 67 per cent of Australians playing video games, and 97 per cent of households with children having video games, Insight asks, “how much is too much? When does video gaming stop being fun?” Laurie Darby represents the fastest growing segment of the population new to games - the over 65s. Retired and living alone, she tells Jenny Brockie that she checks in daily with her family and friends by playing word games on her mobile. Zion, 11, loves playing Fortnite with his friends, and his mother, Rosie, works hard to set boundaries around his gaming. “He has other responsibilities he has to do first, like his homework, and walking and picking up after the dog,” she explains. For Taei Aluni and Maddelin Walster, video games are a source of tension. Taei would keep playing if he was allowed to, but Maddelin says he’s “like a vacant partner” when he’s on the games, and it’s affecting their family. In the wake of the World Health Organisation including “gaming disorder” in its latest International Classification of Diseases, Insight considers whether or not it’s the personality of the gamer, or features built into the games themselves, which sees some people become hooked, while others manage to keep it just for fun.
This week on Dateline, we meet the young journalists trying to unite Rio de Janeiro’s favelas through a news site, started by a local when he was just 11 years old.
When the police come ‘pow, pow, pow’. You get down. Everyone runs into the corridors!”
It’s a tough pill to swallow, but this is the every day reality for children who go to school in Rio de Janeiro’s favelas.
With members from rival drug gangs manning every street corner, and a military campaign adamant on stamping out drug related violence, navigating these slums has become a matter of life and death for most residents. In 2017 alone, 6,731 people lost their lives to violent crimes in Rio.
13 years ago, Rene Silva founded his community newspaper, Voz das Comunidades (VOZ). Once a small-time paper operating from Rene’s home, the young journalists working for VOZ now have deep ties in local communities, and often serve as a point of reference for the larger Brazilian press.
Kitted out in VOZ polos, the reporters use their smartphones and social media to give voice to parents like Fabio and Paloma Morre, who lost their son, Benjamin, to the crossfire between local police and drug traffickers. He was just shy of two years old.
His father, Fabio, waves his phone – with a video of a toddler laughing playing on the screen - at the young journalist interviewing him.
“This is one of the last pictures I took with him – this is a video of him dancing!”
It’s a scene journalist Luana Melo has seen all too many times before.
“It’s important for us to tell the story of the day Benjamin died. So these incidents won’t happen inside the favelas, with such violence.”

Dateline: Children Caught in the Crossfire

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
25:07
This week on Dateline, we meet the young journalists trying to unite Rio de Janeiro’s favelas through a news site, started by a local when he was just 11 years old. When the police come ‘pow, pow, pow’. You get down. Everyone runs into the corridors!” It’s a tough pill to swallow, but this is the every day reality for children who go to school in Rio de Janeiro’s favelas. With members from rival drug gangs manning every street corner, and a military campaign adamant on stamping out drug related violence, navigating these slums has become a matter of life and death for most residents. In 2017 alone, 6,731 people lost their lives to violent crimes in Rio. 13 years ago, Rene Silva founded his community newspaper, Voz das Comunidades (VOZ). Once a small-time paper operating from Rene’s home, the young journalists working for VOZ now have deep ties in local communities, and often serve as a point of reference for the larger Brazilian press. Kitted out in VOZ polos, the reporters use their smartphones and social media to give voice to parents like Fabio and Paloma Morre, who lost their son, Benjamin, to the crossfire between local police and drug traffickers. He was just shy of two years old. His father, Fabio, waves his phone – with a video of a toddler laughing playing on the screen - at the young journalist interviewing him. “This is one of the last pictures I took with him – this is a video of him dancing!” It’s a scene journalist Luana Melo has seen all too many times before. “It’s important for us to tell the story of the day Benjamin died. So these incidents won’t happen inside the favelas, with such violence.”
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