Dateline

Save to playlist
Share video
Create Clip
image/svg+xml
image/svg+xml
image/svg+xml
Dateline: Outlaw Farmer
Outlaw Farmer
SBS  |  July 25, 2017
Classification: Not ClassifiedClassification: Not Classified
This video has closed captioning

This week we meet the French farmer rebelling against authorities to help refugees find a better life in Europe. Is he a good Samaritan helping those in desperate need, or a dangerous people smuggler?

Olive farmer by day, people smuggler by night. In a small French village nestled in the mountains near the southern border with Italy, Cedric Herrou is operating a makeshift refugee centre from his rural property. In contravention of French laws banning citizens from assisting illegal arrivals, Herrou has found himself the focus of a national debate. Are his actions those of a benevolent outlaw helping people in need, or those of a criminal?

Over the past several years he has helped hundreds of mostly young refugees cross the border from Italy to France. Many of the young people he takes in have journeyed across the Mediterranean from Africa, fleeing war, poverty, persecution and dictatorial regimes, looking for a new, safer life in Europe. He feeds and takes care of them at his property - he says he once had 60 people staying there - and helps them seek refuge elsewhere in France, or other countries. But his work has found him in the government's crosshairs. Will the French government imprison someone for helping them make their dreams a reality?

This week we meet the French farmer rebelling against authorities to help refugees find a better life in Europe. Is he a good Samaritan helping those in desperate need, or a dangerous people smuggler?

Olive farmer by day, people smuggler by night. In a small French village nestled in the mountains near the southern border with Italy, Cedric Herrou is operating a makeshift refugee centre from his rural property. In contravention of French laws banning citizens from assisting illegal arrivals, Herrou has found himself the focus of a national debate. Are his actions those of a benevolent outlaw helping people in need, or those of a criminal?

Over the past several years he has helped hundreds of mostly young refugees cross the border from Italy to France. Many of the young people he takes in have journeyed across the Mediterranean from Africa, fleeing war, poverty, persecution and dictatorial regimes, looking for a new, safer life in Europe. He feeds and takes care of them at his property - he says he once had 60 people staying there - and helps them seek refuge elsewhere in France, or other countries. But his work has found him in the government's crosshairs. Will the French government imprison someone for helping them make their dreams a reality?

Save to playlist

Videos in series

See all in series

News and current affairs related videos

See all news and current affairs related videos
Loading...