Dateline

Dateline

Mexico's Beach Wars
SBS  |  March 13, 2018
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Every year hundreds of thousands of tourists travel to the white sand and aqua blue water of Cancun - but with increasing gang violence scaring locals and tourists alike, will people stop going? Acapulco, once one of the most glamourous places in the world, is now the murder capital of Mexico. The city is so dangerous that troops patrol the streets and beaches. Extortion and murder are rife and many businesses have been forced to close. The gang-related issues facing Acapulco are now moving to Cancun - one of Mexico's main tourist destinations, known for its white sand beaches and turquoise waters. Cancun is in the state of Quintana Roo, where there were 169 killings in the first half of 2017, more than double the previous year's figure. Dateline discovers the impact this has had on both the local area and Mexico's billion-dollar tourism industry.

Every year hundreds of thousands of tourists travel to the white sand and aqua blue water of Cancun - but with increasing gang violence scaring locals and tourists alike, will people stop going? Acapulco, once one of the most glamourous places in the world, is now the murder capital of Mexico. The city is so dangerous that troops patrol the streets and beaches. Extortion and murder are rife and many businesses have been forced to close. The gang-related issues facing Acapulco are now moving to Cancun - one of Mexico's main tourist destinations, known for its white sand beaches and turquoise waters. Cancun is in the state of Quintana Roo, where there were 169 killings in the first half of 2017, more than double the previous year's figure. Dateline discovers the impact this has had on both the local area and Mexico's billion-dollar tourism industry.

In Ireland, women can go to jail for getting an abortion, even in cases of rape. As the country votes on whether to change its conservative abortion laws, we take the pulse of a nation divided down the middle.
On May 25, Ireland heading to the polls in a landmark referendum that could finally overturn its abortion laws.
Enshrined in the country's constitution is the protection of the unborn’s right to life – but at what cost?
Dateline reporter Shaunagh Connaire goes to the heart of the referendum debate to meet women and families from both sides of a bitterly divisive issue.
Hitting the streets of Waterford, Shaunagh meets a new generation of young, grassroots campaigners called the Youth Defence who are fighting hard to keep Ireland abortion free. 
“This is a human rights issue," explains Christine Darcy, a trainee teacher working for Youth Defence.
"We have constitutional protection of the unborn, like an equal right to life for the mother and the baby. Why would we take that out of our constitution?"
For many Irish women, the current laws are driving them to extreme lengths - In 2016, 3,265 Irish women travelled to the UK to get an abortion.
Due to the expense, and lack of local support, most make the trip in one day, risking their health in the process. 
"I was given a card with a number on it in order to protect your identity," says one such woman Cathy, who paid £400 for her surgical abortion in a Manchester clinic.
“It’s really heartbreaking to know that you are almost being exported; that this country doesn’t want to know about your problems or your issues.”

Dateline: Ireland's Abortion Debate

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
26:02
In Ireland, women can go to jail for getting an abortion, even in cases of rape. As the country votes on whether to change its conservative abortion laws, we take the pulse of a nation divided down the middle. On May 25, Ireland heading to the polls in a landmark referendum that could finally overturn its abortion laws. Enshrined in the country's constitution is the protection of the unborn’s right to life – but at what cost? Dateline reporter Shaunagh Connaire goes to the heart of the referendum debate to meet women and families from both sides of a bitterly divisive issue. Hitting the streets of Waterford, Shaunagh meets a new generation of young, grassroots campaigners called the Youth Defence who are fighting hard to keep Ireland abortion free. “This is a human rights issue," explains Christine Darcy, a trainee teacher working for Youth Defence. "We have constitutional protection of the unborn, like an equal right to life for the mother and the baby. Why would we take that out of our constitution?" For many Irish women, the current laws are driving them to extreme lengths - In 2016, 3,265 Irish women travelled to the UK to get an abortion. Due to the expense, and lack of local support, most make the trip in one day, risking their health in the process. "I was given a card with a number on it in order to protect your identity," says one such woman Cathy, who paid £400 for her surgical abortion in a Manchester clinic. “It’s really heartbreaking to know that you are almost being exported; that this country doesn’t want to know about your problems or your issues.”
A special investigation into the mass exodus of Rohingya Muslims from Myanmar. The film examines evidence that Myanmar's security forces used systematic rape and terror tactics to expel hundreds of thousands of Rohingya from the country.
Since security forces began a violent campaign in August 2017, up to 700,000 people have fled their homes to travel across the Myanmar border to nearby Bangladesh.
Thousands of civilians, including children, are thought to have been killed, in a story of systematic discrimination, state-sanctioned violence and, ultimately, mass murder.
In this special hour-long Dateline film, reporter Evan Williams hears first-hand about brutal killings and attacks on Myanmar's persecuted Rohingya Muslim population - and looks at whether Myanmar’s leaders, including Nobel Peace Prize laureate Aung San Suu Kyi, should be held accountable for these atrocities.
“She had gone from a human rights heroine, a beacon of democracy, to a politician catering to the military, wanting the military to support her,” says former US Ambassador to the United Nations, Bill Richardson.
Aung San Suu Kyi rejects the criticism and says that the military is simply hunting terrorists, but a network of Rohingya activists were secretly filming what was really happening, risking their lives in the process.Their ground breaking accounts of video evidence of several unknown massacres, provides Dateline with the first proper look at whether the killing of civilians could be genocide.

Dateline: Myanmar's Killing Fields

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
51:58
A special investigation into the mass exodus of Rohingya Muslims from Myanmar. The film examines evidence that Myanmar's security forces used systematic rape and terror tactics to expel hundreds of thousands of Rohingya from the country. Since security forces began a violent campaign in August 2017, up to 700,000 people have fled their homes to travel across the Myanmar border to nearby Bangladesh. Thousands of civilians, including children, are thought to have been killed, in a story of systematic discrimination, state-sanctioned violence and, ultimately, mass murder. In this special hour-long Dateline film, reporter Evan Williams hears first-hand about brutal killings and attacks on Myanmar's persecuted Rohingya Muslim population - and looks at whether Myanmar’s leaders, including Nobel Peace Prize laureate Aung San Suu Kyi, should be held accountable for these atrocities. “She had gone from a human rights heroine, a beacon of democracy, to a politician catering to the military, wanting the military to support her,” says former US Ambassador to the United Nations, Bill Richardson. Aung San Suu Kyi rejects the criticism and says that the military is simply hunting terrorists, but a network of Rohingya activists were secretly filming what was really happening, risking their lives in the process.Their ground breaking accounts of video evidence of several unknown massacres, provides Dateline with the first proper look at whether the killing of civilians could be genocide.
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