Dateline: Keep Out! Manus Island Detention Centre

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Dateline: Keep Out! Manus Island Detention Centre

Clip from Dateline  |  SBS  |  May 28, 2013

What's really happening behind the fence of the Manus Island refugee centre? Dateline hears of attempted suicides and a lack of

What's really happening behind the fence of the Manus Island refugee centre? Dateline hears of attempted suicides and a lack of

Community clip
In Ireland, women can go to jail for getting an abortion, even in cases of rape. As the country votes on whether to change its conservative abortion laws, we take the pulse of a nation divided down the middle.
On May 25, Ireland heading to the polls in a landmark referendum that could finally overturn its abortion laws.
Enshrined in the country's constitution is the protection of the unborn’s right to life – but at what cost?
Dateline reporter Shaunagh Connaire goes to the heart of the referendum debate to meet women and families from both sides of a bitterly divisive issue.
Hitting the streets of Waterford, Shaunagh meets a new generation of young, grassroots campaigners called the Youth Defence who are fighting hard to keep Ireland abortion free. 
“This is a human rights issue," explains Christine Darcy, a trainee teacher working for Youth Defence.
"We have constitutional protection of the unborn, like an equal right to life for the mother and the baby. Why would we take that out of our constitution?"
For many Irish women, the current laws are driving them to extreme lengths - In 2016, 3,265 Irish women travelled to the UK to get an abortion.
Due to the expense, and lack of local support, most make the trip in one day, risking their health in the process. 
"I was given a card with a number on it in order to protect your identity," says one such woman Cathy, who paid £400 for her surgical abortion in a Manchester clinic.
“It’s really heartbreaking to know that you are almost being exported; that this country doesn’t want to know about your problems or your issues.”

Dateline: Ireland's Abortion Debate

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
26:02
In Ireland, women can go to jail for getting an abortion, even in cases of rape. As the country votes on whether to change its conservative abortion laws, we take the pulse of a nation divided down the middle. On May 25, Ireland heading to the polls in a landmark referendum that could finally overturn its abortion laws. Enshrined in the country's constitution is the protection of the unborn’s right to life – but at what cost? Dateline reporter Shaunagh Connaire goes to the heart of the referendum debate to meet women and families from both sides of a bitterly divisive issue. Hitting the streets of Waterford, Shaunagh meets a new generation of young, grassroots campaigners called the Youth Defence who are fighting hard to keep Ireland abortion free. “This is a human rights issue," explains Christine Darcy, a trainee teacher working for Youth Defence. "We have constitutional protection of the unborn, like an equal right to life for the mother and the baby. Why would we take that out of our constitution?" For many Irish women, the current laws are driving them to extreme lengths - In 2016, 3,265 Irish women travelled to the UK to get an abortion. Due to the expense, and lack of local support, most make the trip in one day, risking their health in the process. "I was given a card with a number on it in order to protect your identity," says one such woman Cathy, who paid £400 for her surgical abortion in a Manchester clinic. “It’s really heartbreaking to know that you are almost being exported; that this country doesn’t want to know about your problems or your issues.”
A special investigation into the mass exodus of Rohingya Muslims from Myanmar. The film examines evidence that Myanmar's security forces used systematic rape and terror tactics to expel hundreds of thousands of Rohingya from the country.
Since security forces began a violent campaign in August 2017, up to 700,000 people have fled their homes to travel across the Myanmar border to nearby Bangladesh.
Thousands of civilians, including children, are thought to have been killed, in a story of systematic discrimination, state-sanctioned violence and, ultimately, mass murder.
In this special hour-long Dateline film, reporter Evan Williams hears first-hand about brutal killings and attacks on Myanmar's persecuted Rohingya Muslim population - and looks at whether Myanmar’s leaders, including Nobel Peace Prize laureate Aung San Suu Kyi, should be held accountable for these atrocities.
“She had gone from a human rights heroine, a beacon of democracy, to a politician catering to the military, wanting the military to support her,” says former US Ambassador to the United Nations, Bill Richardson.
Aung San Suu Kyi rejects the criticism and says that the military is simply hunting terrorists, but a network of Rohingya activists were secretly filming what was really happening, risking their lives in the process.Their ground breaking accounts of video evidence of several unknown massacres, provides Dateline with the first proper look at whether the killing of civilians could be genocide.

Dateline: Myanmar's Killing Fields

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
51:58
A special investigation into the mass exodus of Rohingya Muslims from Myanmar. The film examines evidence that Myanmar's security forces used systematic rape and terror tactics to expel hundreds of thousands of Rohingya from the country. Since security forces began a violent campaign in August 2017, up to 700,000 people have fled their homes to travel across the Myanmar border to nearby Bangladesh. Thousands of civilians, including children, are thought to have been killed, in a story of systematic discrimination, state-sanctioned violence and, ultimately, mass murder. In this special hour-long Dateline film, reporter Evan Williams hears first-hand about brutal killings and attacks on Myanmar's persecuted Rohingya Muslim population - and looks at whether Myanmar’s leaders, including Nobel Peace Prize laureate Aung San Suu Kyi, should be held accountable for these atrocities. “She had gone from a human rights heroine, a beacon of democracy, to a politician catering to the military, wanting the military to support her,” says former US Ambassador to the United Nations, Bill Richardson. Aung San Suu Kyi rejects the criticism and says that the military is simply hunting terrorists, but a network of Rohingya activists were secretly filming what was really happening, risking their lives in the process.Their ground breaking accounts of video evidence of several unknown massacres, provides Dateline with the first proper look at whether the killing of civilians could be genocide.
If you’ve ever wondered about how long (or short) your attention span is, or perhaps even worried that there’s something seriously wrong with your ability to pay attention – you’re not alone. 

Insight guest Leanne became concerned about her attention span when she caught up with an old friend over lunch, but couldn’t stop checking her phone and thinking about what else she could be doing – like scrolling through her Facebook. 

At home, she says she gets distracted by something as trivial as a bad smell, or the noise of someone mowing the lawn. It can take her off task and take up her attention for the entire day.

This week on Insight, Leanne’s attention is tested and the findings surprise her.

And guest host Janice Petersen asks the “5 billion dollar question,” as neuroscientist, Associate Professor Paul Dux puts it – can we train, and even increase our attention spans? And how do you do it?

When the stakes are as high as a plane full of people, or a life on the operating table – how can that affect your ability to hold attention, and what can happen if you don’t? 

“The worst case is that two aircraft collide and a catastrophic failure in the system occurs,” air traffic controller Tom McRobert says.

For neurosurgeon Nazih Asaad, the consequences can also be fatal and with the trust of the patient in his hands, the potential risks of the surgery can weigh on him in the lead up to the operation.

AFL player for the GWS Giants Heath Shaw was diagnosed with ADHD when he was a teenager. He says some of the behaviours have followed him into adulthood and on the field.

Insight asks – what is attention, and how can it impact your life? How do you know if your attention span is normal? And what makes some people better at paying attention than others?

Insight: Attention

News and current affairs, Intercultural understanding

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs, Intercultural understanding
53:43
If you’ve ever wondered about how long (or short) your attention span is, or perhaps even worried that there’s something seriously wrong with your ability to pay attention – you’re not alone. Insight guest Leanne became concerned about her attention span when she caught up with an old friend over lunch, but couldn’t stop checking her phone and thinking about what else she could be doing – like scrolling through her Facebook. At home, she says she gets distracted by something as trivial as a bad smell, or the noise of someone mowing the lawn. It can take her off task and take up her attention for the entire day. This week on Insight, Leanne’s attention is tested and the findings surprise her. And guest host Janice Petersen asks the “5 billion dollar question,” as neuroscientist, Associate Professor Paul Dux puts it – can we train, and even increase our attention spans? And how do you do it? When the stakes are as high as a plane full of people, or a life on the operating table – how can that affect your ability to hold attention, and what can happen if you don’t? “The worst case is that two aircraft collide and a catastrophic failure in the system occurs,” air traffic controller Tom McRobert says. For neurosurgeon Nazih Asaad, the consequences can also be fatal and with the trust of the patient in his hands, the potential risks of the surgery can weigh on him in the lead up to the operation. AFL player for the GWS Giants Heath Shaw was diagnosed with ADHD when he was a teenager. He says some of the behaviours have followed him into adulthood and on the field. Insight asks – what is attention, and how can it impact your life? How do you know if your attention span is normal? And what makes some people better at paying attention than others?
Malcolm Turnbull 
Laura Tingle discusses the latest from Canberra, including electricity prices and the possibility of the government funding a new coal-fired power station.
Croatia 
Millions of fans will watch the World Cup decider this weekend - a David and Goliath contest between a football powerhouse and a tiny country that's never made the final before. After beating England, Croatia will take on the tournament favourites France in the final.
Mortgage Choice 
One of Australia's biggest publicly listed brokers, Mortgage Choice, has an overhaul of its remuneration model. It says it will now pay franchisees more and reduce the volatility of their income. It comes after complaints from franchisees, who said Mortgage Choice's business model was leaving some brokers in financial ruin.
Trump set to meet NATO leaders as part of European visit
US President starts the beginning of what promises to be stormy week-long visit to Europe with a NATO meeting in Belgium. Rachael Rizzo of the Centre for a New American Security discusses what may happen.
Miss America beauty pageant 
For the first time in nearly 100 years, when young women vying for the title of Miss America appear on stage in Atlantic City this September it won't be in swimsuits. In the #MeToo era, the historic pageant is promising Miss America 2.0 will focus on contestants talents, intelligence and ideas - not their outward appearance. But not everyone is happy to say bye-bye to the bikinis.

7.30: Malcolm Turnbull/Croatia/Mortgage Choice/Trump Meets NATO Leaders/Miss America Beauty Pageant

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
30:36
Malcolm Turnbull Laura Tingle discusses the latest from Canberra, including electricity prices and the possibility of the government funding a new coal-fired power station. Croatia Millions of fans will watch the World Cup decider this weekend - a David and Goliath contest between a football powerhouse and a tiny country that's never made the final before. After beating England, Croatia will take on the tournament favourites France in the final. Mortgage Choice One of Australia's biggest publicly listed brokers, Mortgage Choice, has an overhaul of its remuneration model. It says it will now pay franchisees more and reduce the volatility of their income. It comes after complaints from franchisees, who said Mortgage Choice's business model was leaving some brokers in financial ruin. Trump set to meet NATO leaders as part of European visit US President starts the beginning of what promises to be stormy week-long visit to Europe with a NATO meeting in Belgium. Rachael Rizzo of the Centre for a New American Security discusses what may happen. Miss America beauty pageant For the first time in nearly 100 years, when young women vying for the title of Miss America appear on stage in Atlantic City this September it won't be in swimsuits. In the #MeToo era, the historic pageant is promising Miss America 2.0 will focus on contestants talents, intelligence and ideas - not their outward appearance. But not everyone is happy to say bye-bye to the bikinis.
Fortnite Phenomenon 
If you have kids, chances are they're among the 125 million people playing the popular video game Fortnite. And it's driving some parents and teachers crazy. They are flocking to professional help to pry their kids away but for others the game is just like any other hobby - it's all about balance.
Bernard Collaery
Unprecedented legal action against two men for allegedly breaching the intelligence services act has sparked fierce debate about the balance between national security and the public's right to know.
Rod Sims 
Australia's competition watchdog has laid out a sweeping plan to bring those bills down and says it could save households up to $400 a year. Rod Sims outlines what the ACCC has in mind.
Rural Mental Health
A western Victorian farmer has come up with a bald plan to give his industry national exposure. He's convincing an increasing number of his colleagues to take their kit off. It's part of a cheeky new campaign called "The Naked Farmer", which aims to raise awareness of - and funding for - mental health.
Dept. of Veterans' Affairs
Last month 7.30 aired a story about the extraordinary lengths the Department of Veterans' Affairs went to, to thwart a compensation claim: secretly changing its own policy in order to stop a claim by a former elite paratrooper who had badly injured his back. We've now learnt the head of the Veterans' Affairs department has requested a meeting with Mr Rollins in order to issue a personal apology. The ministers for Defence and Veterans Affairs have also ordered a departmental review into the matter.

7.30: Fortnite Phenomenon/ Bernard Collaery/Rod Sims/Rural Mental Health/Dept. of Veteran Affairs

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
31:31
Fortnite Phenomenon If you have kids, chances are they're among the 125 million people playing the popular video game Fortnite. And it's driving some parents and teachers crazy. They are flocking to professional help to pry their kids away but for others the game is just like any other hobby - it's all about balance. Bernard Collaery Unprecedented legal action against two men for allegedly breaching the intelligence services act has sparked fierce debate about the balance between national security and the public's right to know. Rod Sims Australia's competition watchdog has laid out a sweeping plan to bring those bills down and says it could save households up to $400 a year. Rod Sims outlines what the ACCC has in mind. Rural Mental Health A western Victorian farmer has come up with a bald plan to give his industry national exposure. He's convincing an increasing number of his colleagues to take their kit off. It's part of a cheeky new campaign called "The Naked Farmer", which aims to raise awareness of - and funding for - mental health. Dept. of Veterans' Affairs Last month 7.30 aired a story about the extraordinary lengths the Department of Veterans' Affairs went to, to thwart a compensation claim: secretly changing its own policy in order to stop a claim by a former elite paratrooper who had badly injured his back. We've now learnt the head of the Veterans' Affairs department has requested a meeting with Mr Rollins in order to issue a personal apology. The ministers for Defence and Veterans Affairs have also ordered a departmental review into the matter.
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