Catalyst

Catalyst

Too Much Medicine
ABC  |  October 27, 2015
Classification: General Classification: General
This video has closed captioning

Could our relentless pursuit of good health be making us sick? Advances in medicine have propelled health care to new heights. A vast array of diagnostic tests and drug therapies is now available but an increasing number of doctors now say that sometimes, "less is more" when it comes to medical interventions. They argue that excessive interventions are causing more harm than good. Dr Maryanne Demasi examines how our relentless pursuit for good health could be making people sick.

Could our relentless pursuit of good health be making us sick? Advances in medicine have propelled health care to new heights. A vast array of diagnostic tests and drug therapies is now available but an increasing number of doctors now say that sometimes, "less is more" when it comes to medical interventions. They argue that excessive interventions are causing more harm than good. Dr Maryanne Demasi examines how our relentless pursuit for good health could be making people sick.

Is Trump's 'zero-tolerance' immigration policy violating human rights? In the days following Trump's U-turn, this program follows one family's fight to get their seven-year-old son back, after he was taken away at the border.
“Hug your son because you’re not going to see him anymore,”  Ludy Garcia was told at the U.S. Border.
Under President Trump’s Zero Tolerance Policy which took effect in April this year, immigrant children were housed in shelters, separated from their families, for an average of 41 days. Ludy’s 7-year-old son, Osmin, spent 51 days in detention between May and July this year.
Ludy and  Osmin are just two of the many victims of family separation at the U.S. border, who fled their homes under threats of gang violence and extortion.  
On April 6 2018, Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced a new policy for an "escalated effort to prosecute those who choose to illegally cross our border." 
Trump’s administration has directed federal prosecutors to prioritise immigration cases. Athough the policy does not explicitly call for the separation of parent and child, in practice, it does precisely that: While parents are taken to be prosecuted, their children are left with a sponsor or at a shelter.
Back home in Guatemala, mother Lesbia is at the family’s hut, eagerly awaiting her weekly phone call with Osmin – all she knows is that he has been taken to a shelter in Arizona.
“Every time I go to sleep, I pray for you,” Osmin sobs into the phone.

Dateline: Trump's Zero Tolerance

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
26:00
Is Trump's 'zero-tolerance' immigration policy violating human rights? In the days following Trump's U-turn, this program follows one family's fight to get their seven-year-old son back, after he was taken away at the border. “Hug your son because you’re not going to see him anymore,” Ludy Garcia was told at the U.S. Border. Under President Trump’s Zero Tolerance Policy which took effect in April this year, immigrant children were housed in shelters, separated from their families, for an average of 41 days. Ludy’s 7-year-old son, Osmin, spent 51 days in detention between May and July this year. Ludy and Osmin are just two of the many victims of family separation at the U.S. border, who fled their homes under threats of gang violence and extortion. On April 6 2018, Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced a new policy for an "escalated effort to prosecute those who choose to illegally cross our border." Trump’s administration has directed federal prosecutors to prioritise immigration cases. Athough the policy does not explicitly call for the separation of parent and child, in practice, it does precisely that: While parents are taken to be prosecuted, their children are left with a sponsor or at a shelter. Back home in Guatemala, mother Lesbia is at the family’s hut, eagerly awaiting her weekly phone call with Osmin – all she knows is that he has been taken to a shelter in Arizona. “Every time I go to sleep, I pray for you,” Osmin sobs into the phone.
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