Impacts of Sea Level Rise - short clip

Community clip

Impacts of Sea Level Rise - short clip

Clip from Catalyst  |  ABC  |  July 17, 2014
Classification: General Classification: General
This video has closed captioning

Australian perspective. Explore what is currently making our oceans expand, and how this will change over time. Will the West An

Australian perspective. Explore what is currently making our oceans expand, and how this will change over time. Will the West An

Community clip
Jenny Brockie takes a look at chronic fatigue syndrome, what symptoms it has, and how people with the condition have managed it.
At 20 years old, Adele Clydesdale had just climbed Mount Kilimanjaro; she was starting her second year of university and playing in the Victorian Netball League.
So when she got glandular fever, she didn’t think much of it. She knew plenty of people who’d had it in high school and they always recovered quickly.
But even when tests results revealed the glandular fever was out of her system, Adele was still unwell and her symptoms were getting worse. She was increasingly fatigued, couldn’t string sentences together and had extreme body pain.
At six months, it was confirmed Adele had chronic fatigue syndrome, a diagnosis she found quite confronting.
Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is estimated to affect between 0.2-2 per cent of the population in Australia yet very little is known about this condition.
Otherwise known as Myalgic Encephalomyelitis or ME, it is an illness characterised by profound fatigue, not relieved by sleep or rest and worsened with activity.
Patients will commonly experience muscle and joint pain, impaired memory and concentration and gastrointestinal disorders. However, the most defining indicator of CFS is Post Exertional Malaise (PEM) - when a certain level of cognitive or physical exertion will exacerbate a patient’s symptoms.
There are currently no proven treatments for CFS which means many are left without answers. Ketra Wooding has been unwell for eight years and with such severe symptoms, she has been living in a nursing home for five of those years.

Insight: Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

News and current affairs, Intercultural understanding

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs, Intercultural understanding
51:56
Jenny Brockie takes a look at chronic fatigue syndrome, what symptoms it has, and how people with the condition have managed it. At 20 years old, Adele Clydesdale had just climbed Mount Kilimanjaro; she was starting her second year of university and playing in the Victorian Netball League. So when she got glandular fever, she didn’t think much of it. She knew plenty of people who’d had it in high school and they always recovered quickly. But even when tests results revealed the glandular fever was out of her system, Adele was still unwell and her symptoms were getting worse. She was increasingly fatigued, couldn’t string sentences together and had extreme body pain. At six months, it was confirmed Adele had chronic fatigue syndrome, a diagnosis she found quite confronting. Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is estimated to affect between 0.2-2 per cent of the population in Australia yet very little is known about this condition. Otherwise known as Myalgic Encephalomyelitis or ME, it is an illness characterised by profound fatigue, not relieved by sleep or rest and worsened with activity. Patients will commonly experience muscle and joint pain, impaired memory and concentration and gastrointestinal disorders. However, the most defining indicator of CFS is Post Exertional Malaise (PEM) - when a certain level of cognitive or physical exertion will exacerbate a patient’s symptoms. There are currently no proven treatments for CFS which means many are left without answers. Ketra Wooding has been unwell for eight years and with such severe symptoms, she has been living in a nursing home for five of those years.
The man who broke Watergate talks about Donald Trump
Donald Trump may have popularised the term 'fake news', but the wild nature of his presidency has also spawned an extraordinary series of insider accounts of his chaotic White House. The latest and most substantial of these is 'Fear' by veteran Washington reporter Bob Woodward.
Young women and injuries
The introduction of an AFL women's competition, the rise of the Matildas, and the increasing popularity of women's cricket all reflect a huge increase in the popularity of women's team sport. But with this surge has come a significant increase in serious knee injuries. Women are up to ten times more likely to rupture their anterior cruciate ligament than men, and Australia has the highest rate of knee reconstructions in the world.
Energy distributors push for a cap on solar power
More than six solar panels are installed across Australia every minute of every day as people try to tackle rising power prices. But the industry that owns Australia's poles and wires says all that power from the sun is a problem and it could destabilise the electricity grid. The solar industry disagrees, and it's preparing for a fight with the power networks.
Asian elephants under threat 
The Asian elephant is one of the world's most majestic animals. But now these gentle giants face a threat that could wipe them out completely … poachers who want their skin.

7.30: October 15, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
29:08
The man who broke Watergate talks about Donald Trump Donald Trump may have popularised the term 'fake news', but the wild nature of his presidency has also spawned an extraordinary series of insider accounts of his chaotic White House. The latest and most substantial of these is 'Fear' by veteran Washington reporter Bob Woodward. Young women and injuries The introduction of an AFL women's competition, the rise of the Matildas, and the increasing popularity of women's cricket all reflect a huge increase in the popularity of women's team sport. But with this surge has come a significant increase in serious knee injuries. Women are up to ten times more likely to rupture their anterior cruciate ligament than men, and Australia has the highest rate of knee reconstructions in the world. Energy distributors push for a cap on solar power More than six solar panels are installed across Australia every minute of every day as people try to tackle rising power prices. But the industry that owns Australia's poles and wires says all that power from the sun is a problem and it could destabilise the electricity grid. The solar industry disagrees, and it's preparing for a fight with the power networks. Asian elephants under threat The Asian elephant is one of the world's most majestic animals. But now these gentle giants face a threat that could wipe them out completely … poachers who want their skin.
Religious Freedom
The warring forces within the federal Coalition have been notably silent in recent weeks, with all sides only too aware that such divisions could torpedo the chances their chances in the Wentworth by-election. But that peace was shattered today by the leaking of some details of a tightly-held report on proposed changes to religious freedom laws. The Australian Financial Review's political editor Phil Coorey discusses the latest developments.
South China Sea
Former US Director of National Intelligence, James Clapper, takes a look at what is happening in the South China Sea.
Tensions rise between China and the US
Tensions are rising between the world's two biggest economies. The tough talks follows last week's incident in the South China Sea, where warships from the United States and China came within 45 metres of colliding. The US is already locked in a trade war with Beijing and the US President has accused China of meddling in its upcoming elections.
Deadly dust
Silicosis is a potentially deadly lung disease mostly associated with the coal mining industry. But there has been a silicosis outbreak in Queensland among tradesmen who make kitchen and bathroom bench tops with engineered stone. Some of those workers and the medical profession are sounding the alarm about what they fear could become a public health emergency.
Richard Branson's personal appeal 
The executions of convicted drug smugglers Andrew Chan and Myuran Sukumaran in Indonesia in 2015 shocked Australia. But they also attracted global interest - including from some unlikely places. Virgin founder Sir Richard Branson is a passionate campaigner against the death penalty and made a personal appeal to Indonesia's president at the time to spare the couple.

7.30: October 10, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
31:07
Religious Freedom The warring forces within the federal Coalition have been notably silent in recent weeks, with all sides only too aware that such divisions could torpedo the chances their chances in the Wentworth by-election. But that peace was shattered today by the leaking of some details of a tightly-held report on proposed changes to religious freedom laws. The Australian Financial Review's political editor Phil Coorey discusses the latest developments. South China Sea Former US Director of National Intelligence, James Clapper, takes a look at what is happening in the South China Sea. Tensions rise between China and the US Tensions are rising between the world's two biggest economies. The tough talks follows last week's incident in the South China Sea, where warships from the United States and China came within 45 metres of colliding. The US is already locked in a trade war with Beijing and the US President has accused China of meddling in its upcoming elections. Deadly dust Silicosis is a potentially deadly lung disease mostly associated with the coal mining industry. But there has been a silicosis outbreak in Queensland among tradesmen who make kitchen and bathroom bench tops with engineered stone. Some of those workers and the medical profession are sounding the alarm about what they fear could become a public health emergency. Richard Branson's personal appeal The executions of convicted drug smugglers Andrew Chan and Myuran Sukumaran in Indonesia in 2015 shocked Australia. But they also attracted global interest - including from some unlikely places. Virgin founder Sir Richard Branson is a passionate campaigner against the death penalty and made a personal appeal to Indonesia's president at the time to spare the couple.
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