Impacts of Sea Level Rise - short clip

Community clip

Impacts of Sea Level Rise - short clip

Clip from Catalyst  |  ABC  |  July 17, 2014
Classification: General Classification: General
This video has closed captioning

Australian perspective. Explore what is currently making our oceans expand, and how this will change over time. Will the West An

Australian perspective. Explore what is currently making our oceans expand, and how this will change over time. Will the West An

Community clip
Is Trump's 'zero-tolerance' immigration policy violating human rights? In the days following Trump's U-turn, this program follows one family's fight to get their seven-year-old son back, after he was taken away at the border.
“Hug your son because you’re not going to see him anymore,”  Ludy Garcia was told at the U.S. Border.
Under President Trump’s Zero Tolerance Policy which took effect in April this year, immigrant children were housed in shelters, separated from their families, for an average of 41 days. Ludy’s 7-year-old son, Osmin, spent 51 days in detention between May and July this year.
Ludy and  Osmin are just two of the many victims of family separation at the U.S. border, who fled their homes under threats of gang violence and extortion.  
On April 6 2018, Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced a new policy for an "escalated effort to prosecute those who choose to illegally cross our border." 
Trump’s administration has directed federal prosecutors to prioritise immigration cases. Athough the policy does not explicitly call for the separation of parent and child, in practice, it does precisely that: While parents are taken to be prosecuted, their children are left with a sponsor or at a shelter.
Back home in Guatemala, mother Lesbia is at the family’s hut, eagerly awaiting her weekly phone call with Osmin – all she knows is that he has been taken to a shelter in Arizona.
“Every time I go to sleep, I pray for you,” Osmin sobs into the phone.

Dateline: Trump's Zero Tolerance

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
26:00
Is Trump's 'zero-tolerance' immigration policy violating human rights? In the days following Trump's U-turn, this program follows one family's fight to get their seven-year-old son back, after he was taken away at the border. “Hug your son because you’re not going to see him anymore,” Ludy Garcia was told at the U.S. Border. Under President Trump’s Zero Tolerance Policy which took effect in April this year, immigrant children were housed in shelters, separated from their families, for an average of 41 days. Ludy’s 7-year-old son, Osmin, spent 51 days in detention between May and July this year. Ludy and Osmin are just two of the many victims of family separation at the U.S. border, who fled their homes under threats of gang violence and extortion. On April 6 2018, Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced a new policy for an "escalated effort to prosecute those who choose to illegally cross our border." Trump’s administration has directed federal prosecutors to prioritise immigration cases. Athough the policy does not explicitly call for the separation of parent and child, in practice, it does precisely that: While parents are taken to be prosecuted, their children are left with a sponsor or at a shelter. Back home in Guatemala, mother Lesbia is at the family’s hut, eagerly awaiting her weekly phone call with Osmin – all she knows is that he has been taken to a shelter in Arizona. “Every time I go to sleep, I pray for you,” Osmin sobs into the phone.
Gamble of life
Soon after meeting and falling in love, Andrew and Olivia Densley agreed they both adored kids and wanted a large family. They got married and got on with their dream. But after having their fourth child they received terrible news. Their third child, a son, had a genetic immune deficiency disease which looked likely to kill him. Just when all seemed lost though, he was saved by a long-shot miracle. His little brother, the couple’s fourth child, was a match as a bone marrow donor. But as Tom Steinfort reports, at this point the story gets even more complicated. While Andrew and Olivia knew the substantial risks of having more children, it didn’t stop them. Olivia fell pregnant with a fifth child who was also born with the usually fatal disease. But having rolled the dice and lost, the couple refused to give up. It has taken several years and a hundred thousand dollars, but they’ve managed to engineer another extraordinary solution.
A magpie called Penguin
Somewhere, flying around the northern beaches of Sydney, is a magpie called Penguin who often thinks she’s a human. And if that’s not incredible enough, this amazing bird has another claim to fame – she’s a lifesaver. Penguin taught Sam Bloom, a mother of three, how to live again after she fell from a balcony, broke her back and became a paraplegic. It’s a truly inspiring tale that not surprisingly will also soon be a Hollywood movie

60 Minutes: Gamble of life/ A Magpie called Penguin

News and current affairs

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs
48:40
Gamble of life Soon after meeting and falling in love, Andrew and Olivia Densley agreed they both adored kids and wanted a large family. They got married and got on with their dream. But after having their fourth child they received terrible news. Their third child, a son, had a genetic immune deficiency disease which looked likely to kill him. Just when all seemed lost though, he was saved by a long-shot miracle. His little brother, the couple’s fourth child, was a match as a bone marrow donor. But as Tom Steinfort reports, at this point the story gets even more complicated. While Andrew and Olivia knew the substantial risks of having more children, it didn’t stop them. Olivia fell pregnant with a fifth child who was also born with the usually fatal disease. But having rolled the dice and lost, the couple refused to give up. It has taken several years and a hundred thousand dollars, but they’ve managed to engineer another extraordinary solution. A magpie called Penguin Somewhere, flying around the northern beaches of Sydney, is a magpie called Penguin who often thinks she’s a human. And if that’s not incredible enough, this amazing bird has another claim to fame – she’s a lifesaver. Penguin taught Sam Bloom, a mother of three, how to live again after she fell from a balcony, broke her back and became a paraplegic. It’s a truly inspiring tale that not surprisingly will also soon be a Hollywood movie
Rural News
A look at rural and regional issues making the news this week.
Heywire: Muriel
Muriel Hunter had a tragic start to life and struggled in school, but now she's fulfilling her dream
Defying the Drought
A large part of eastern Australia is drought declared, and the big dry is hitting farmers and communities hard. But some farmers seem to be defying the drought. Marty McCarthy hits the road to meet them.
Hall of Fame
The rural press club honour is awarded to Queensland-based journalists who have made a significant contribution to the profession for more than 20 years and have helped support the next generation of rural journalists. Pip has been a reporter on the ABC’s flagship rural current affairs program Landline for the past 25 years and its host since 2012.
Open Sesame
Farmers and scientists in central Queensland have just trialled the country’s first commercial crop of black sesame seed and early results are showing great potential.
Markets Report
Market activity and analysis with Kerry Lonergan.
Farm Tech
Farmers have partnered with programmers, engineers and inventors to help make farming more efficient. It’s part of a University ‘Tech-Connect’ program and together they’ve come up with some very creative solutions to some everyday on-farm problems.

Landline: August 12, 2018

Business and economics, Earth and environment, Sustainability, News and current affairs

Years 9-10, 11-12 Business and economics, Earth and environment, Sustainability, News and current affairs
57:15
Rural News A look at rural and regional issues making the news this week. Heywire: Muriel Muriel Hunter had a tragic start to life and struggled in school, but now she's fulfilling her dream Defying the Drought A large part of eastern Australia is drought declared, and the big dry is hitting farmers and communities hard. But some farmers seem to be defying the drought. Marty McCarthy hits the road to meet them. Hall of Fame The rural press club honour is awarded to Queensland-based journalists who have made a significant contribution to the profession for more than 20 years and have helped support the next generation of rural journalists. Pip has been a reporter on the ABC’s flagship rural current affairs program Landline for the past 25 years and its host since 2012. Open Sesame Farmers and scientists in central Queensland have just trialled the country’s first commercial crop of black sesame seed and early results are showing great potential. Markets Report Market activity and analysis with Kerry Lonergan. Farm Tech Farmers have partnered with programmers, engineers and inventors to help make farming more efficient. It’s part of a University ‘Tech-Connect’ program and together they’ve come up with some very creative solutions to some everyday on-farm problems.
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