Nuclear dumping dilemma

Community clip

Nuclear dumping dilemma

Clip from Behind The News  |  ABC3  |  February 22, 2016

A look at both sides of the debate surrounding a proposed nuclear waste dump in South Australia.

A look at both sides of the debate surrounding a proposed nuclear waste dump in South Australia.

Community clip
Iran Deal
One of the biggest news stories of the week was US President Donald Trump's decision to pull out of an international agreement with Iran. It was made back in 2015 because lots of countries were worried that Iran was trying to make nuclear weapons. While many world leaders said the deal was the best way to bring about peace, others said it didn't do enough to stop Iran making weapons. We find out why ditching the deal is a really big deal for the US and the world.

Hawaii Volcano
One of the world's most active volcanos has been causing havoc in Hawaii. Mt Kilauea has been spewing out ash and rivers of lava which has destroyed homes and property. We find out more about the volcano and meet some local kids who live in the shadow of the volcano.

Aussie Space Agency
This week's federal budget contained an exciting announcement for space enthusiasts. The government is planning to put $41 million into the space industry and, for the first time, the country will get its very own space agency! We find out what Australia's future role in space might look like and why so many countries put money into exploring the cosmos.

Young Archies
We meet nine-year-old James, who is one of the finalists of this year's Young Archie competition. It's the junior version of Australia's most famous portrait prize, the Archibald, and it asks kids to draw or paint someone who's important to them. We find out more about the Archibald and meet the art teacher who inspired James to paint his masterpiece.

BTN Investigates: Toilet water
BTN viewer Pollyanna asked us to find out where toilet water goes, so we decided to investigate! Amelia goes on a fascinating, but slightly smelly tour of a waste water treatment plant to find out what happens when we flush the loo.

Behind the News: Iran Deal/Hawaii Volcano/Aussie Space Agency/Young Archies/Toilet water

News and current affairs

Years 3-4, 5-6 News and current affairs
24:26
Iran Deal One of the biggest news stories of the week was US President Donald Trump's decision to pull out of an international agreement with Iran. It was made back in 2015 because lots of countries were worried that Iran was trying to make nuclear weapons. While many world leaders said the deal was the best way to bring about peace, others said it didn't do enough to stop Iran making weapons. We find out why ditching the deal is a really big deal for the US and the world. Hawaii Volcano One of the world's most active volcanos has been causing havoc in Hawaii. Mt Kilauea has been spewing out ash and rivers of lava which has destroyed homes and property. We find out more about the volcano and meet some local kids who live in the shadow of the volcano. Aussie Space Agency This week's federal budget contained an exciting announcement for space enthusiasts. The government is planning to put $41 million into the space industry and, for the first time, the country will get its very own space agency! We find out what Australia's future role in space might look like and why so many countries put money into exploring the cosmos. Young Archies We meet nine-year-old James, who is one of the finalists of this year's Young Archie competition. It's the junior version of Australia's most famous portrait prize, the Archibald, and it asks kids to draw or paint someone who's important to them. We find out more about the Archibald and meet the art teacher who inspired James to paint his masterpiece. BTN Investigates: Toilet water BTN viewer Pollyanna asked us to find out where toilet water goes, so we decided to investigate! Amelia goes on a fascinating, but slightly smelly tour of a waste water treatment plant to find out what happens when we flush the loo.
Budget 2018
Next Tuesday is budget day - when the federal government outlines how it's planning to spend Australia's money. It's one of the biggest days of the year for Aussie politicians but it's also an important day for ordinary Aussies, because the budget affects us all. We find out what the budget is and why keeping everyone happy can be a difficult job.

Korea Talks
Over the past few weeks there's been some good news about North and South Korea. For the first time in a decade the leaders of the two countries have met and they say they're working towards a peace treaty. We find out why that's a big deal by having a look at the history of North Korea and South Korea.

Free Range Eggs
For a long time there's been debate in Australia about chickens and eggs - that is - how chickens are farmed and how eggs are labelled. Many customers are willing to pay more for eggs that are "free range", but there's been some confusion about exactly what free range means. Now some new laws have come in which aim to clear that up. We visit an egg farm to find out more about the news laws and how they could affect Aussie farmers and Aussie breakfasts!

Bionic Builder
We find out about a year 8 student from Melbourne who challenged herself with a Christmas holiday school assignment. She looked into bionic technology and 3D printing and managed to build a bionic arm from scratch!

Ask a Reporter: Why Do We Listen to Music?
BTN viewer Isabelle asks is the intriguing question; "Why do people like music so much?" Jack goes on a musical journey to find out more about the story of song and why the tunes that we love get our toes tapping.

Behind the News: Budget 2018/Korea Talks/Free Range Eggs/Bionic Builder/Why Do We Listen to Music?

News and current affairs

Years 3-4, 5-6 News and current affairs
24:27
Budget 2018 Next Tuesday is budget day - when the federal government outlines how it's planning to spend Australia's money. It's one of the biggest days of the year for Aussie politicians but it's also an important day for ordinary Aussies, because the budget affects us all. We find out what the budget is and why keeping everyone happy can be a difficult job. Korea Talks Over the past few weeks there's been some good news about North and South Korea. For the first time in a decade the leaders of the two countries have met and they say they're working towards a peace treaty. We find out why that's a big deal by having a look at the history of North Korea and South Korea. Free Range Eggs For a long time there's been debate in Australia about chickens and eggs - that is - how chickens are farmed and how eggs are labelled. Many customers are willing to pay more for eggs that are "free range", but there's been some confusion about exactly what free range means. Now some new laws have come in which aim to clear that up. We visit an egg farm to find out more about the news laws and how they could affect Aussie farmers and Aussie breakfasts! Bionic Builder We find out about a year 8 student from Melbourne who challenged herself with a Christmas holiday school assignment. She looked into bionic technology and 3D printing and managed to build a bionic arm from scratch! Ask a Reporter: Why Do We Listen to Music? BTN viewer Isabelle asks is the intriguing question; "Why do people like music so much?" Jack goes on a musical journey to find out more about the story of song and why the tunes that we love get our toes tapping.
Banks Behaving Badly
A royal commission into Aussie banks has put some of our most powerful financial institutions under the spotlight and some seriously dodgy dealings are being uncovered. We'll look at the important role that banks play in the lives of Australians, why the royal commission came about and why its findings have made a lot of people angry.

Villers-Bretonneux Centenary
This Anzac Day marked 100 years since thousands of Australian soldiers fought to free a tiny French town from German occupation during World War I. Its name is Villers-Bretonneux and the battle that took place there is recognised as an important turning point in the war. We find out more about what happened in Villers-Bretonneux and why the town still has a special connection to Australia.

BTN Kids Contribute Survey Results
Recently we asked kids around Australia to tell us how they contribute at home, at school at in their communities. More than 11,000 took part in the survey and now the results are in. This week we'll tell you more about how kids are contributing and how it makes them feel.

Composting Kids
Did you know that next week is International Compost Awareness Week? It might not be on everyone's calendar but experts say composting is a process we should all know more about. We meet some school kids who explain how compost can scrap pollution and build healthier soils.  

Corny Business
We meet Sam, a young entrepreneur, whose popcorn business has taken off since it launched late last year. Sam tells us what it's like to run a business and whether there's any such thing as too much popcorn!

Behind the News: Banks Behaving Badly/Villers-Bretonneux Centenary/BTN Kids Contribute/Composting Kids/Corny Business

News and current affairs

Years 3-4, 5-6 News and current affairs
24:25
Banks Behaving Badly A royal commission into Aussie banks has put some of our most powerful financial institutions under the spotlight and some seriously dodgy dealings are being uncovered. We'll look at the important role that banks play in the lives of Australians, why the royal commission came about and why its findings have made a lot of people angry. Villers-Bretonneux Centenary This Anzac Day marked 100 years since thousands of Australian soldiers fought to free a tiny French town from German occupation during World War I. Its name is Villers-Bretonneux and the battle that took place there is recognised as an important turning point in the war. We find out more about what happened in Villers-Bretonneux and why the town still has a special connection to Australia. BTN Kids Contribute Survey Results Recently we asked kids around Australia to tell us how they contribute at home, at school at in their communities. More than 11,000 took part in the survey and now the results are in. This week we'll tell you more about how kids are contributing and how it makes them feel. Composting Kids Did you know that next week is International Compost Awareness Week? It might not be on everyone's calendar but experts say composting is a process we should all know more about. We meet some school kids who explain how compost can scrap pollution and build healthier soils. Corny Business We meet Sam, a young entrepreneur, whose popcorn business has taken off since it launched late last year. Sam tells us what it's like to run a business and whether there's any such thing as too much popcorn!
The Assassins are a legend in the Muslim world. Part freedom fighters, part special forces and part Islamic fundamentalists, they were set up back in the 11th century in today's Syria around the time of the First Christian Crusade in the Holy Land. They were an elite sect of highly trained killers who often operated behind enemy lines, in deep cover, assassinating military leaders and rulers. Their covert tactics and ruthless operations spread fear and terror across the medieval world. Assassinations were primarily carried out with a dagger, which was sometimes tipped with poison. As their legend and infamy grew they started to carry out their assassinations in public spaces so as to instil terror in their foes. They would often assimilate themselves in the cities, palaces and fortresses of their targets and, over time, stealthily insert themselves into strategic positions. Although many scholars believe that they died out after the Crusades, there are those who say that they simply went 'underground' with reports of their activities in the early 20th century. Certainly, the Assassins have inspired, and possibly given rise to, many of today's Islamic fundamentalist groups, including the Taliban in Afghanistan, Al Qaeda and even ISIS. The training methods, secrecy, ruthlessness and covert operations of all these groups are directly the result of The Assassins.

Inside Secret Societies: The Order of the Assassins

Ethical understanding, Critical thinking

Years 11-12 Ethical understanding, Critical thinking
45:10
The Assassins are a legend in the Muslim world. Part freedom fighters, part special forces and part Islamic fundamentalists, they were set up back in the 11th century in today's Syria around the time of the First Christian Crusade in the Holy Land. They were an elite sect of highly trained killers who often operated behind enemy lines, in deep cover, assassinating military leaders and rulers. Their covert tactics and ruthless operations spread fear and terror across the medieval world. Assassinations were primarily carried out with a dagger, which was sometimes tipped with poison. As their legend and infamy grew they started to carry out their assassinations in public spaces so as to instil terror in their foes. They would often assimilate themselves in the cities, palaces and fortresses of their targets and, over time, stealthily insert themselves into strategic positions. Although many scholars believe that they died out after the Crusades, there are those who say that they simply went 'underground' with reports of their activities in the early 20th century. Certainly, the Assassins have inspired, and possibly given rise to, many of today's Islamic fundamentalist groups, including the Taliban in Afghanistan, Al Qaeda and even ISIS. The training methods, secrecy, ruthlessness and covert operations of all these groups are directly the result of The Assassins.
With its origins in the Samurai culture of 17th century Japan, the Yakusa are one of the most infamous, secret and feared of all Asian secret societies. They call themselves a 'chivalrous organisation', and are notorious for their strict codes of conduct and highly organised structure, with an estimated 100,000 members today. They started as hired security men for local festivals, markets and gambling dens, before slowly growing in power and prestige. Today they are a vast organisation and their leaders, known as Oyabun, maintain strict rules within the ranks. No disloyalty is permitted. Yubitsume, or the cutting off of a finger, is a form of penance or apology. Upon a first offence, the transgressor must cut off the tip of his left little finger and give the severed portion to his boss. Its origin stems from the traditional way of holding a Japanese sword. The removal of digits starting with the little finger moving up the hand to the index finger progressively weakens a person's sword grip. Many Yakusa have full-body tattoos known as Irezumi which are often "hand-poked", that is, the ink is inserted beneath the skin using non-electrical, handmade and hand-held tools with needles of sharpened bamboo or steel. The Yakusa are a very powerful organisation in Japan who's tentacles of influence reach the very highest levels of power. Drawing on their rich Samurai heritage they believe they can operate above and beyond modern laws and government, bringing what they see as a purer form of justice and control to a corrupt country.

Inside Secret Societies: The Yakuza

Ethical understanding, Critical thinking

Years 11-12 Ethical understanding, Critical thinking
46:00
With its origins in the Samurai culture of 17th century Japan, the Yakusa are one of the most infamous, secret and feared of all Asian secret societies. They call themselves a 'chivalrous organisation', and are notorious for their strict codes of conduct and highly organised structure, with an estimated 100,000 members today. They started as hired security men for local festivals, markets and gambling dens, before slowly growing in power and prestige. Today they are a vast organisation and their leaders, known as Oyabun, maintain strict rules within the ranks. No disloyalty is permitted. Yubitsume, or the cutting off of a finger, is a form of penance or apology. Upon a first offence, the transgressor must cut off the tip of his left little finger and give the severed portion to his boss. Its origin stems from the traditional way of holding a Japanese sword. The removal of digits starting with the little finger moving up the hand to the index finger progressively weakens a person's sword grip. Many Yakusa have full-body tattoos known as Irezumi which are often "hand-poked", that is, the ink is inserted beneath the skin using non-electrical, handmade and hand-held tools with needles of sharpened bamboo or steel. The Yakusa are a very powerful organisation in Japan who's tentacles of influence reach the very highest levels of power. Drawing on their rich Samurai heritage they believe they can operate above and beyond modern laws and government, bringing what they see as a purer form of justice and control to a corrupt country.
Hitler and the key officers of the Nazi High Command were all members of three main secret societies which had a strong belief in the occult; the Vril Society, the Thule society and the Ahnenerbe. The Vril Society was based on a novel written in 1871 by Edward Bulwer-Lytton called The Power of the Coming Race which talks of a superior subterranean master race and the energy-form called "Vril" which powers UFO's from hidden bases beneath the arctic ice. It sounds crazy but Hitler, Himmler and other leading Nazis took it very seriously. The Thule Society was named after a mythical northern country from Greek legend which was the origins of the "Aryan Race", also thought to have been the mythical Atlantis. It had about 2000 members, insisting on intense loyalty and secrecy, as well pure white blood, "untainted" by any other race, or colour. This belief in the Aryan race and its connection to Atlantis led to the foundation of the Ahnenerbe by Heinrich Himmler to research the archaeological and racial heritage of the Aryan race. It conducted experiments and launched expeditions in an attempt to find the lost city of Atlantis, and prove that mythological Aryan populations had once ruled the world. Although the Vril and Thule societies, as well as the Ahnenerbe were officially disbanded at the end of World War ll, there are reports that they continued for many decades afterwards through surviving Nazi officers in Europe, America and South America. Today, it's believed that several Neo-Nazi groups made up of descendants of former German soldiers, politicians and new, younger recruits, keep the flame alive, with regular meetings, and the same beliefs.

Inside Secret Societies: Nazi Occult Societies

Ethical understanding, Critical thinking

Years 11-12 Ethical understanding, Critical thinking
46:58
Hitler and the key officers of the Nazi High Command were all members of three main secret societies which had a strong belief in the occult; the Vril Society, the Thule society and the Ahnenerbe. The Vril Society was based on a novel written in 1871 by Edward Bulwer-Lytton called The Power of the Coming Race which talks of a superior subterranean master race and the energy-form called "Vril" which powers UFO's from hidden bases beneath the arctic ice. It sounds crazy but Hitler, Himmler and other leading Nazis took it very seriously. The Thule Society was named after a mythical northern country from Greek legend which was the origins of the "Aryan Race", also thought to have been the mythical Atlantis. It had about 2000 members, insisting on intense loyalty and secrecy, as well pure white blood, "untainted" by any other race, or colour. This belief in the Aryan race and its connection to Atlantis led to the foundation of the Ahnenerbe by Heinrich Himmler to research the archaeological and racial heritage of the Aryan race. It conducted experiments and launched expeditions in an attempt to find the lost city of Atlantis, and prove that mythological Aryan populations had once ruled the world. Although the Vril and Thule societies, as well as the Ahnenerbe were officially disbanded at the end of World War ll, there are reports that they continued for many decades afterwards through surviving Nazi officers in Europe, America and South America. Today, it's believed that several Neo-Nazi groups made up of descendants of former German soldiers, politicians and new, younger recruits, keep the flame alive, with regular meetings, and the same beliefs.
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