My little pony convention

Community clip

My little pony convention

Clip from Behind The News  |  ABC ME  |  October 13, 2014
Classification: General Classification: General
This video has closed captioning

Some may be surprised that there are many different types of My Little Pony fans, with male fans giving themselves the nickname Bronies. While most toys and children's entertainment are designed with a specific group or gender in mind, people are still free to like whatever they want. Meet some Bronies and learn about what they get out of My Little Pony and the community they're a part of.

Some may be surprised that there are many different types of My Little Pony fans, with male fans giving themselves the nickname Bronies. While most toys and children's entertainment are designed with a specific group or gender in mind, people are still free to like whatever they want. Meet some Bronies and learn about what they get out of My Little Pony and the community they're a part of.

Community clip
Iran Deal
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Hawaii Volcano
One of the world's most active volcanos has been causing havoc in Hawaii. Mt Kilauea has been spewing out ash and rivers of lava which has destroyed homes and property. We find out more about the volcano and meet some local kids who live in the shadow of the volcano.

Aussie Space Agency
This week's federal budget contained an exciting announcement for space enthusiasts. The government is planning to put $41 million into the space industry and, for the first time, the country will get its very own space agency! We find out what Australia's future role in space might look like and why so many countries put money into exploring the cosmos.

Young Archies
We meet nine-year-old James, who is one of the finalists of this year's Young Archie competition. It's the junior version of Australia's most famous portrait prize, the Archibald, and it asks kids to draw or paint someone who's important to them. We find out more about the Archibald and meet the art teacher who inspired James to paint his masterpiece.

BTN Investigates: Toilet water
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Behind the News: Iran Deal/Hawaii Volcano/Aussie Space Agency/Young Archies/Toilet water

News and current affairs

Years 3-4, 5-6 News and current affairs
24:26
Iran Deal One of the biggest news stories of the week was US President Donald Trump's decision to pull out of an international agreement with Iran. It was made back in 2015 because lots of countries were worried that Iran was trying to make nuclear weapons. While many world leaders said the deal was the best way to bring about peace, others said it didn't do enough to stop Iran making weapons. We find out why ditching the deal is a really big deal for the US and the world. Hawaii Volcano One of the world's most active volcanos has been causing havoc in Hawaii. Mt Kilauea has been spewing out ash and rivers of lava which has destroyed homes and property. We find out more about the volcano and meet some local kids who live in the shadow of the volcano. Aussie Space Agency This week's federal budget contained an exciting announcement for space enthusiasts. The government is planning to put $41 million into the space industry and, for the first time, the country will get its very own space agency! We find out what Australia's future role in space might look like and why so many countries put money into exploring the cosmos. Young Archies We meet nine-year-old James, who is one of the finalists of this year's Young Archie competition. It's the junior version of Australia's most famous portrait prize, the Archibald, and it asks kids to draw or paint someone who's important to them. We find out more about the Archibald and meet the art teacher who inspired James to paint his masterpiece. BTN Investigates: Toilet water BTN viewer Pollyanna asked us to find out where toilet water goes, so we decided to investigate! Amelia goes on a fascinating, but slightly smelly tour of a waste water treatment plant to find out what happens when we flush the loo.
Budget 2018
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Korea Talks
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Free Range Eggs
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Bionic Builder
We find out about a year 8 student from Melbourne who challenged herself with a Christmas holiday school assignment. She looked into bionic technology and 3D printing and managed to build a bionic arm from scratch!

Ask a Reporter: Why Do We Listen to Music?
BTN viewer Isabelle asks is the intriguing question; "Why do people like music so much?" Jack goes on a musical journey to find out more about the story of song and why the tunes that we love get our toes tapping.

Behind the News: Budget 2018/Korea Talks/Free Range Eggs/Bionic Builder/Why Do We Listen to Music?

News and current affairs

Years 3-4, 5-6 News and current affairs
24:27
Budget 2018 Next Tuesday is budget day - when the federal government outlines how it's planning to spend Australia's money. It's one of the biggest days of the year for Aussie politicians but it's also an important day for ordinary Aussies, because the budget affects us all. We find out what the budget is and why keeping everyone happy can be a difficult job. Korea Talks Over the past few weeks there's been some good news about North and South Korea. For the first time in a decade the leaders of the two countries have met and they say they're working towards a peace treaty. We find out why that's a big deal by having a look at the history of North Korea and South Korea. Free Range Eggs For a long time there's been debate in Australia about chickens and eggs - that is - how chickens are farmed and how eggs are labelled. Many customers are willing to pay more for eggs that are "free range", but there's been some confusion about exactly what free range means. Now some new laws have come in which aim to clear that up. We visit an egg farm to find out more about the news laws and how they could affect Aussie farmers and Aussie breakfasts! Bionic Builder We find out about a year 8 student from Melbourne who challenged herself with a Christmas holiday school assignment. She looked into bionic technology and 3D printing and managed to build a bionic arm from scratch! Ask a Reporter: Why Do We Listen to Music? BTN viewer Isabelle asks is the intriguing question; "Why do people like music so much?" Jack goes on a musical journey to find out more about the story of song and why the tunes that we love get our toes tapping.
Banks Behaving Badly
A royal commission into Aussie banks has put some of our most powerful financial institutions under the spotlight and some seriously dodgy dealings are being uncovered. We'll look at the important role that banks play in the lives of Australians, why the royal commission came about and why its findings have made a lot of people angry.

Villers-Bretonneux Centenary
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BTN Kids Contribute Survey Results
Recently we asked kids around Australia to tell us how they contribute at home, at school at in their communities. More than 11,000 took part in the survey and now the results are in. This week we'll tell you more about how kids are contributing and how it makes them feel.

Composting Kids
Did you know that next week is International Compost Awareness Week? It might not be on everyone's calendar but experts say composting is a process we should all know more about. We meet some school kids who explain how compost can scrap pollution and build healthier soils.  

Corny Business
We meet Sam, a young entrepreneur, whose popcorn business has taken off since it launched late last year. Sam tells us what it's like to run a business and whether there's any such thing as too much popcorn!

Behind the News: Banks Behaving Badly/Villers-Bretonneux Centenary/BTN Kids Contribute/Composting Kids/Corny Business

News and current affairs

Years 3-4, 5-6 News and current affairs
24:25
Banks Behaving Badly A royal commission into Aussie banks has put some of our most powerful financial institutions under the spotlight and some seriously dodgy dealings are being uncovered. We'll look at the important role that banks play in the lives of Australians, why the royal commission came about and why its findings have made a lot of people angry. Villers-Bretonneux Centenary This Anzac Day marked 100 years since thousands of Australian soldiers fought to free a tiny French town from German occupation during World War I. Its name is Villers-Bretonneux and the battle that took place there is recognised as an important turning point in the war. We find out more about what happened in Villers-Bretonneux and why the town still has a special connection to Australia. BTN Kids Contribute Survey Results Recently we asked kids around Australia to tell us how they contribute at home, at school at in their communities. More than 11,000 took part in the survey and now the results are in. This week we'll tell you more about how kids are contributing and how it makes them feel. Composting Kids Did you know that next week is International Compost Awareness Week? It might not be on everyone's calendar but experts say composting is a process we should all know more about. We meet some school kids who explain how compost can scrap pollution and build healthier soils. Corny Business We meet Sam, a young entrepreneur, whose popcorn business has taken off since it launched late last year. Sam tells us what it's like to run a business and whether there's any such thing as too much popcorn!
Tariffs
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Hawking's Life
World-famous scientist Stephen Hawking has died at the age of 76. He was a pioneer in cosmology and theoretical physics. We'll find out how he made such a big impact on scientific thinking around the world.
 
Australia's Population: A BTN two-part special
Our next 'Ask a Reporter' topic
In part 2 of BTN's special look at Australia's population, we'll investigate where our population is headed and take a look at both sides of the growth debate. Then on Friday following the show, join us live for Ask a Reporter, where Jack and Amelia will answer all of your population questions.
 
Amelia Earhart
New research has concluded that that bones discovered on an island in the Pacific in 1940 are likely those of Amelia Earhart. She was a legendary aviator that disappeared on an around-the-world flight attempt. We'll take a look back at her life to find out why she's still an inspiration today.
 
BTN Investigates: How do planes fly?
Following on from Amelia Earhart's story, one of our viewers wants to know "How do planes fly?" We sent Matt out on a wing and a hunt for the answer.

Behind the News: Tariffs/Hawking's Life/Australia's Population/Amelia Earhart/How do planes fly?

News and current affairs

Years 3-4, 5-6 News and current affairs
24:27
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Voting Age Experiment
Our next 'Ask a Reporter' topic
In Australia, no one can vote in an election until they turn 18. But what would happen if that age was lowered? That's something that South Australia's Commissioner for Children and Young People is aiming to test during the upcoming state election there. The group are asking school students aged 16 and 17 to vote, before adding those unofficial results to real ones to see what effect it would have had.
 
Australia's Population - a BTN two part special
Over the next two weeks, BTN will join the rest of the ABC in taking a special look at Australia's population. In the first of our two part special, we're going to take a look back at our long journey to 24 million people. We'll follow that with an investigation into where our population is headed and the debate around whether that growth is good.

BTN's Kids Contribute Survey
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Plastic Campaign
Meet a 12-year old on a mission to reduce the amount of plastic in our oceans. Arlian has been dubbed the 'plastic-free boy' and he hopes to inspire kids around the country with his own documentary, 'Plastic Alarm'.
 
Record Message
The world's oldest message in a bottle has been discovered in Western Australia, 132 years after it was dropped in the ocean. It's an incredible find - and it's telling historians a more than you might expect.

Behind the News: Voting Age Experiment/Australia's Population/Kids Contribute Survey/Plastic Campaign/Record Message

News and current affairs

Years 3-4, 5-6 News and current affairs
24:36
Voting Age Experiment Our next 'Ask a Reporter' topic In Australia, no one can vote in an election until they turn 18. But what would happen if that age was lowered? That's something that South Australia's Commissioner for Children and Young People is aiming to test during the upcoming state election there. The group are asking school students aged 16 and 17 to vote, before adding those unofficial results to real ones to see what effect it would have had. Australia's Population - a BTN two part special Over the next two weeks, BTN will join the rest of the ABC in taking a special look at Australia's population. In the first of our two part special, we're going to take a look back at our long journey to 24 million people. We'll follow that with an investigation into where our population is headed and the debate around whether that growth is good. BTN's Kids Contribute Survey How much good do Australian kids do in their homes, schools and communities? That's exactly what we want to find out with the first ever BTN Kids Contribute Survey. Watch our story all about a young volunteer - and then jump online to fill in our short survey about all the things you do for others. Plastic Campaign Meet a 12-year old on a mission to reduce the amount of plastic in our oceans. Arlian has been dubbed the 'plastic-free boy' and he hopes to inspire kids around the country with his own documentary, 'Plastic Alarm'. Record Message The world's oldest message in a bottle has been discovered in Western Australia, 132 years after it was dropped in the ocean. It's an incredible find - and it's telling historians a more than you might expect.
The Coalition
Our next 'Ask a Reporter" topic
Recently the federal National party elected a new leader, named Michael McCormack. Soon after, the Australian Government swore in a new Deputy Prime Minister, also named Michael McCormack. That important role is always given to the leader of the Nationals as part of its agreement with the Liberal party. But when did this agreement start? And what's in it for both sides?

International Women's Day
The 8th of March is International Women's Day, when we're encouraged to learn more about the inequality faced by women and girls everywhere. But it's also a time to celebrate some of the amazing contributions women have made. To get you started, we'll run through some of the major milestones in the fight for women's rights and find out about a new ABC kids podcast that highlights the inspiring stories behind some of Australia's most inspiring women.

Mardi Gras History
It's a celebration attended by hundreds of thousands of people every year and this year it turns 40. But how did Sydney's Mardi Gras festival actually begin? We'll take you back in history to find out.

Dingo Heroes
A new study has found that sometimes dingoes can become unlikely heroes to small native animals. The wild dogs hunt feral predators like foxes and cats and, in the process, protect smaller native mammals that would usually be their dinner.
 
Racing Class
This weekend Australia's best V8 Supercar drivers will take part in the Adelaide 500. But before they hit the track, they'll be grilled by a group of school kids as part of a junior press conference. We tagged along to find out how these rookie reporters go - and discover what other lessons these kids can be taught in pit lane.

Behind the News: The Coalition/International Women's Day/Mardi Gras History/Dingo Heroes/Racing Class

News and current affairs

Years 3-4, 5-6 News and current affairs
24:27
The Coalition Our next 'Ask a Reporter" topic Recently the federal National party elected a new leader, named Michael McCormack. Soon after, the Australian Government swore in a new Deputy Prime Minister, also named Michael McCormack. That important role is always given to the leader of the Nationals as part of its agreement with the Liberal party. But when did this agreement start? And what's in it for both sides? International Women's Day The 8th of March is International Women's Day, when we're encouraged to learn more about the inequality faced by women and girls everywhere. But it's also a time to celebrate some of the amazing contributions women have made. To get you started, we'll run through some of the major milestones in the fight for women's rights and find out about a new ABC kids podcast that highlights the inspiring stories behind some of Australia's most inspiring women. Mardi Gras History It's a celebration attended by hundreds of thousands of people every year and this year it turns 40. But how did Sydney's Mardi Gras festival actually begin? We'll take you back in history to find out. Dingo Heroes A new study has found that sometimes dingoes can become unlikely heroes to small native animals. The wild dogs hunt feral predators like foxes and cats and, in the process, protect smaller native mammals that would usually be their dinner. Racing Class This weekend Australia's best V8 Supercar drivers will take part in the Adelaide 500. But before they hit the track, they'll be grilled by a group of school kids as part of a junior press conference. We tagged along to find out how these rookie reporters go - and discover what other lessons these kids can be taught in pit lane.
Jenny Brockie takes a look at chronic fatigue syndrome, what symptoms it has, and how people with the condition have managed it.
At 20 years old, Adele Clydesdale had just climbed Mount Kilimanjaro; she was starting her second year of university and playing in the Victorian Netball League.
So when she got glandular fever, she didn’t think much of it. She knew plenty of people who’d had it in high school and they always recovered quickly.
But even when tests results revealed the glandular fever was out of her system, Adele was still unwell and her symptoms were getting worse. She was increasingly fatigued, couldn’t string sentences together and had extreme body pain.
At six months, it was confirmed Adele had chronic fatigue syndrome, a diagnosis she found quite confronting.
Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is estimated to affect between 0.2-2 per cent of the population in Australia yet very little is known about this condition.
Otherwise known as Myalgic Encephalomyelitis or ME, it is an illness characterised by profound fatigue, not relieved by sleep or rest and worsened with activity.
Patients will commonly experience muscle and joint pain, impaired memory and concentration and gastrointestinal disorders. However, the most defining indicator of CFS is Post Exertional Malaise (PEM) - when a certain level of cognitive or physical exertion will exacerbate a patient’s symptoms.
There are currently no proven treatments for CFS which means many are left without answers. Ketra Wooding has been unwell for eight years and with such severe symptoms, she has been living in a nursing home for five of those years.

Insight: Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

News and current affairs, Intercultural understanding

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs, Intercultural understanding
51:56
Jenny Brockie takes a look at chronic fatigue syndrome, what symptoms it has, and how people with the condition have managed it. At 20 years old, Adele Clydesdale had just climbed Mount Kilimanjaro; she was starting her second year of university and playing in the Victorian Netball League. So when she got glandular fever, she didn’t think much of it. She knew plenty of people who’d had it in high school and they always recovered quickly. But even when tests results revealed the glandular fever was out of her system, Adele was still unwell and her symptoms were getting worse. She was increasingly fatigued, couldn’t string sentences together and had extreme body pain. At six months, it was confirmed Adele had chronic fatigue syndrome, a diagnosis she found quite confronting. Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is estimated to affect between 0.2-2 per cent of the population in Australia yet very little is known about this condition. Otherwise known as Myalgic Encephalomyelitis or ME, it is an illness characterised by profound fatigue, not relieved by sleep or rest and worsened with activity. Patients will commonly experience muscle and joint pain, impaired memory and concentration and gastrointestinal disorders. However, the most defining indicator of CFS is Post Exertional Malaise (PEM) - when a certain level of cognitive or physical exertion will exacerbate a patient’s symptoms. There are currently no proven treatments for CFS which means many are left without answers. Ketra Wooding has been unwell for eight years and with such severe symptoms, she has been living in a nursing home for five of those years.
The man who broke Watergate talks about Donald Trump
Donald Trump may have popularised the term 'fake news', but the wild nature of his presidency has also spawned an extraordinary series of insider accounts of his chaotic White House. The latest and most substantial of these is 'Fear' by veteran Washington reporter Bob Woodward.
Young women and injuries
The introduction of an AFL women's competition, the rise of the Matildas, and the increasing popularity of women's cricket all reflect a huge increase in the popularity of women's team sport. But with this surge has come a significant increase in serious knee injuries. Women are up to ten times more likely to rupture their anterior cruciate ligament than men, and Australia has the highest rate of knee reconstructions in the world.
Energy distributors push for a cap on solar power
More than six solar panels are installed across Australia every minute of every day as people try to tackle rising power prices. But the industry that owns Australia's poles and wires says all that power from the sun is a problem and it could destabilise the electricity grid. The solar industry disagrees, and it's preparing for a fight with the power networks.
Asian elephants under threat 
The Asian elephant is one of the world's most majestic animals. But now these gentle giants face a threat that could wipe them out completely … poachers who want their skin.

7.30: October 15, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
29:08
The man who broke Watergate talks about Donald Trump Donald Trump may have popularised the term 'fake news', but the wild nature of his presidency has also spawned an extraordinary series of insider accounts of his chaotic White House. The latest and most substantial of these is 'Fear' by veteran Washington reporter Bob Woodward. Young women and injuries The introduction of an AFL women's competition, the rise of the Matildas, and the increasing popularity of women's cricket all reflect a huge increase in the popularity of women's team sport. But with this surge has come a significant increase in serious knee injuries. Women are up to ten times more likely to rupture their anterior cruciate ligament than men, and Australia has the highest rate of knee reconstructions in the world. Energy distributors push for a cap on solar power More than six solar panels are installed across Australia every minute of every day as people try to tackle rising power prices. But the industry that owns Australia's poles and wires says all that power from the sun is a problem and it could destabilise the electricity grid. The solar industry disagrees, and it's preparing for a fight with the power networks. Asian elephants under threat The Asian elephant is one of the world's most majestic animals. But now these gentle giants face a threat that could wipe them out completely … poachers who want their skin.
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