Is it okay to skip school on your birthday?

Community clip

Is it okay to skip school on your birthday?

Clip from Behind The News  |  ABC ME  |  November 3, 2014

Noone wants to be stuck at school on their birthday but some schools have penalised parents that allow their children to skip. Several kids give their opinion on whether or not it's okay to stay home and celebrate on your birthday and what constitutes a good enough reason to be absent from class.

Noone wants to be stuck at school on their birthday but some schools have penalised parents that allow their children to skip. Several kids give their opinion on whether or not it's okay to stay home and celebrate on your birthday and what constitutes a good enough reason to be absent from class.

Community clip
Iran Deal
One of the biggest news stories of the week was US President Donald Trump's decision to pull out of an international agreement with Iran. It was made back in 2015 because lots of countries were worried that Iran was trying to make nuclear weapons. While many world leaders said the deal was the best way to bring about peace, others said it didn't do enough to stop Iran making weapons. We find out why ditching the deal is a really big deal for the US and the world.

Hawaii Volcano
One of the world's most active volcanos has been causing havoc in Hawaii. Mt Kilauea has been spewing out ash and rivers of lava which has destroyed homes and property. We find out more about the volcano and meet some local kids who live in the shadow of the volcano.

Aussie Space Agency
This week's federal budget contained an exciting announcement for space enthusiasts. The government is planning to put $41 million into the space industry and, for the first time, the country will get its very own space agency! We find out what Australia's future role in space might look like and why so many countries put money into exploring the cosmos.

Young Archies
We meet nine-year-old James, who is one of the finalists of this year's Young Archie competition. It's the junior version of Australia's most famous portrait prize, the Archibald, and it asks kids to draw or paint someone who's important to them. We find out more about the Archibald and meet the art teacher who inspired James to paint his masterpiece.

BTN Investigates: Toilet water
BTN viewer Pollyanna asked us to find out where toilet water goes, so we decided to investigate! Amelia goes on a fascinating, but slightly smelly tour of a waste water treatment plant to find out what happens when we flush the loo.

Behind the News: Iran Deal/Hawaii Volcano/Aussie Space Agency/Young Archies/Toilet water

News and current affairs

Years 3-4, 5-6 News and current affairs
24:26
Iran Deal One of the biggest news stories of the week was US President Donald Trump's decision to pull out of an international agreement with Iran. It was made back in 2015 because lots of countries were worried that Iran was trying to make nuclear weapons. While many world leaders said the deal was the best way to bring about peace, others said it didn't do enough to stop Iran making weapons. We find out why ditching the deal is a really big deal for the US and the world. Hawaii Volcano One of the world's most active volcanos has been causing havoc in Hawaii. Mt Kilauea has been spewing out ash and rivers of lava which has destroyed homes and property. We find out more about the volcano and meet some local kids who live in the shadow of the volcano. Aussie Space Agency This week's federal budget contained an exciting announcement for space enthusiasts. The government is planning to put $41 million into the space industry and, for the first time, the country will get its very own space agency! We find out what Australia's future role in space might look like and why so many countries put money into exploring the cosmos. Young Archies We meet nine-year-old James, who is one of the finalists of this year's Young Archie competition. It's the junior version of Australia's most famous portrait prize, the Archibald, and it asks kids to draw or paint someone who's important to them. We find out more about the Archibald and meet the art teacher who inspired James to paint his masterpiece. BTN Investigates: Toilet water BTN viewer Pollyanna asked us to find out where toilet water goes, so we decided to investigate! Amelia goes on a fascinating, but slightly smelly tour of a waste water treatment plant to find out what happens when we flush the loo.
Budget 2018
Next Tuesday is budget day - when the federal government outlines how it's planning to spend Australia's money. It's one of the biggest days of the year for Aussie politicians but it's also an important day for ordinary Aussies, because the budget affects us all. We find out what the budget is and why keeping everyone happy can be a difficult job.

Korea Talks
Over the past few weeks there's been some good news about North and South Korea. For the first time in a decade the leaders of the two countries have met and they say they're working towards a peace treaty. We find out why that's a big deal by having a look at the history of North Korea and South Korea.

Free Range Eggs
For a long time there's been debate in Australia about chickens and eggs - that is - how chickens are farmed and how eggs are labelled. Many customers are willing to pay more for eggs that are "free range", but there's been some confusion about exactly what free range means. Now some new laws have come in which aim to clear that up. We visit an egg farm to find out more about the news laws and how they could affect Aussie farmers and Aussie breakfasts!

Bionic Builder
We find out about a year 8 student from Melbourne who challenged herself with a Christmas holiday school assignment. She looked into bionic technology and 3D printing and managed to build a bionic arm from scratch!

Ask a Reporter: Why Do We Listen to Music?
BTN viewer Isabelle asks is the intriguing question; "Why do people like music so much?" Jack goes on a musical journey to find out more about the story of song and why the tunes that we love get our toes tapping.

Behind the News: Budget 2018/Korea Talks/Free Range Eggs/Bionic Builder/Why Do We Listen to Music?

News and current affairs

Years 3-4, 5-6 News and current affairs
24:27
Budget 2018 Next Tuesday is budget day - when the federal government outlines how it's planning to spend Australia's money. It's one of the biggest days of the year for Aussie politicians but it's also an important day for ordinary Aussies, because the budget affects us all. We find out what the budget is and why keeping everyone happy can be a difficult job. Korea Talks Over the past few weeks there's been some good news about North and South Korea. For the first time in a decade the leaders of the two countries have met and they say they're working towards a peace treaty. We find out why that's a big deal by having a look at the history of North Korea and South Korea. Free Range Eggs For a long time there's been debate in Australia about chickens and eggs - that is - how chickens are farmed and how eggs are labelled. Many customers are willing to pay more for eggs that are "free range", but there's been some confusion about exactly what free range means. Now some new laws have come in which aim to clear that up. We visit an egg farm to find out more about the news laws and how they could affect Aussie farmers and Aussie breakfasts! Bionic Builder We find out about a year 8 student from Melbourne who challenged herself with a Christmas holiday school assignment. She looked into bionic technology and 3D printing and managed to build a bionic arm from scratch! Ask a Reporter: Why Do We Listen to Music? BTN viewer Isabelle asks is the intriguing question; "Why do people like music so much?" Jack goes on a musical journey to find out more about the story of song and why the tunes that we love get our toes tapping.
Banks Behaving Badly
A royal commission into Aussie banks has put some of our most powerful financial institutions under the spotlight and some seriously dodgy dealings are being uncovered. We'll look at the important role that banks play in the lives of Australians, why the royal commission came about and why its findings have made a lot of people angry.

Villers-Bretonneux Centenary
This Anzac Day marked 100 years since thousands of Australian soldiers fought to free a tiny French town from German occupation during World War I. Its name is Villers-Bretonneux and the battle that took place there is recognised as an important turning point in the war. We find out more about what happened in Villers-Bretonneux and why the town still has a special connection to Australia.

BTN Kids Contribute Survey Results
Recently we asked kids around Australia to tell us how they contribute at home, at school at in their communities. More than 11,000 took part in the survey and now the results are in. This week we'll tell you more about how kids are contributing and how it makes them feel.

Composting Kids
Did you know that next week is International Compost Awareness Week? It might not be on everyone's calendar but experts say composting is a process we should all know more about. We meet some school kids who explain how compost can scrap pollution and build healthier soils.  

Corny Business
We meet Sam, a young entrepreneur, whose popcorn business has taken off since it launched late last year. Sam tells us what it's like to run a business and whether there's any such thing as too much popcorn!

Behind the News: Banks Behaving Badly/Villers-Bretonneux Centenary/BTN Kids Contribute/Composting Kids/Corny Business

News and current affairs

Years 3-4, 5-6 News and current affairs
24:25
Banks Behaving Badly A royal commission into Aussie banks has put some of our most powerful financial institutions under the spotlight and some seriously dodgy dealings are being uncovered. We'll look at the important role that banks play in the lives of Australians, why the royal commission came about and why its findings have made a lot of people angry. Villers-Bretonneux Centenary This Anzac Day marked 100 years since thousands of Australian soldiers fought to free a tiny French town from German occupation during World War I. Its name is Villers-Bretonneux and the battle that took place there is recognised as an important turning point in the war. We find out more about what happened in Villers-Bretonneux and why the town still has a special connection to Australia. BTN Kids Contribute Survey Results Recently we asked kids around Australia to tell us how they contribute at home, at school at in their communities. More than 11,000 took part in the survey and now the results are in. This week we'll tell you more about how kids are contributing and how it makes them feel. Composting Kids Did you know that next week is International Compost Awareness Week? It might not be on everyone's calendar but experts say composting is a process we should all know more about. We meet some school kids who explain how compost can scrap pollution and build healthier soils. Corny Business We meet Sam, a young entrepreneur, whose popcorn business has taken off since it launched late last year. Sam tells us what it's like to run a business and whether there's any such thing as too much popcorn!
India claims a dramatic win 
Despite dogged resistance from Australia's tail, India has taken an historic early lead in the four Test series after snatching victory in the opening match by 31 runs. It's just the sixth time India has won a Test on Australian soil.
Commentator Andrew Moore takes a look at a dramatic final day.
Are we overlooking the role of the public sector in the economy?
Mariana Mazzucato is something of a rockstar in the world of global economics. She's written two best-sellers arguing that it's actually the public sector which has made the crucial investments that have transformed the world economy. In Australia for a series of public lectures, she sat down to talk with Laura Tingle.

Sanjeev Gupta unveils plans for Whyalla
It's rare to see the Prime Minister and Opposition leader at the same press conference, but both were present in South Australia today as British billionaire Sanjeev Gupta unveiled his plans for a massive new steelworks project that will revive the town of Whyalla.

Remembering the 1966 helicopter crash 
The 11th of December marks the anniversary of a tragic accident over Sydney Harbour that changed our aviation safety laws. On that day in 1966 a helicopter chartered by the ABC ran into technical problems mid flight and crashed into the Sydney CBD. Remarkably the accident was filmed by two cameras, including one capturing the haunting last moments inside the ill-fated helicopter. And a warning, this report contains images some viewers may find distressing.

What is the future of Australia's housing market?
For years it seemed that property prices would rise for ever. But not any more. We are now in what the Reserve Bank governor has called "uncharted territory", where property prices are falling in our two biggest cities, even though unemployment is stable and the economy is growing.

7.30: December 10, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
29:43
India claims a dramatic win Despite dogged resistance from Australia's tail, India has taken an historic early lead in the four Test series after snatching victory in the opening match by 31 runs. It's just the sixth time India has won a Test on Australian soil. Commentator Andrew Moore takes a look at a dramatic final day. Are we overlooking the role of the public sector in the economy? Mariana Mazzucato is something of a rockstar in the world of global economics. She's written two best-sellers arguing that it's actually the public sector which has made the crucial investments that have transformed the world economy. In Australia for a series of public lectures, she sat down to talk with Laura Tingle. Sanjeev Gupta unveils plans for Whyalla It's rare to see the Prime Minister and Opposition leader at the same press conference, but both were present in South Australia today as British billionaire Sanjeev Gupta unveiled his plans for a massive new steelworks project that will revive the town of Whyalla. Remembering the 1966 helicopter crash The 11th of December marks the anniversary of a tragic accident over Sydney Harbour that changed our aviation safety laws. On that day in 1966 a helicopter chartered by the ABC ran into technical problems mid flight and crashed into the Sydney CBD. Remarkably the accident was filmed by two cameras, including one capturing the haunting last moments inside the ill-fated helicopter. And a warning, this report contains images some viewers may find distressing. What is the future of Australia's housing market? For years it seemed that property prices would rise for ever. But not any more. We are now in what the Reserve Bank governor has called "uncharted territory", where property prices are falling in our two biggest cities, even though unemployment is stable and the economy is growing.
Major parties clash over discrimination bill
The second last day of federal parliament for the year and the level of frenzy rose considerably. Asylum seekers, energy and the economy were all being debated, but it was the issue of discrimination against gay students attending religious schools, that had the government and opposition in fiercest combat.

Ita Buttrose gives advice to her younger self
When Ita Buttrose started Cleo magazine in 1972, it was the first time a women's publication was frank about sexuality and it went on to become a huge success. That was just the beginning for a woman who's paved the way for women in journalism ever since. Now Ita Buttrose shares her wisdom in our 'advice to my younger self' series.

Chris Dawson 
Renee Simms, the niece of Lynette Dawson, talks about the arrest of Chris Murphy, who is expected to be charged with the murder of his wife 36 years ago.
 
Reverse mortgages leaving the elderly high and dry
Reverse mortgages are touted as a way to unlock equity in the family home by borrowing against the asset without needing to make repayments until the house is sold or the owner moves out or dies. But a number of banks, including Australia's biggest lender the Commonwealth Bank, are now getting out of the reverse mortgage market, in the face of criticism from the peak financial regulator, ASIC.
Closing Europe's biggest steel works
In the south of Italy, a major corruption trial is underway that is pitting a local community against Europe's biggest steelworks, the Ilva plant in Taranto. The pollution from the plant is so bad it has been blamed in official government reports for the deaths of almost 400 local residents. The former owners of the company have been accused of crimes against public safety.

7.30: December 5, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
30:36
Major parties clash over discrimination bill The second last day of federal parliament for the year and the level of frenzy rose considerably. Asylum seekers, energy and the economy were all being debated, but it was the issue of discrimination against gay students attending religious schools, that had the government and opposition in fiercest combat. Ita Buttrose gives advice to her younger self When Ita Buttrose started Cleo magazine in 1972, it was the first time a women's publication was frank about sexuality and it went on to become a huge success. That was just the beginning for a woman who's paved the way for women in journalism ever since. Now Ita Buttrose shares her wisdom in our 'advice to my younger self' series. Chris Dawson Renee Simms, the niece of Lynette Dawson, talks about the arrest of Chris Murphy, who is expected to be charged with the murder of his wife 36 years ago. Reverse mortgages leaving the elderly high and dry Reverse mortgages are touted as a way to unlock equity in the family home by borrowing against the asset without needing to make repayments until the house is sold or the owner moves out or dies. But a number of banks, including Australia's biggest lender the Commonwealth Bank, are now getting out of the reverse mortgage market, in the face of criticism from the peak financial regulator, ASIC. Closing Europe's biggest steel works In the south of Italy, a major corruption trial is underway that is pitting a local community against Europe's biggest steelworks, the Ilva plant in Taranto. The pollution from the plant is so bad it has been blamed in official government reports for the deaths of almost 400 local residents. The former owners of the company have been accused of crimes against public safety.
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