Australian Story

Australian Story

Long Way From Home (Part 1)
ABC  |  July 10, 2017

When Rosie Ayliffe's only child, Mia Ayliffe-Chung, was murdered last August in a Queensland backpacker hostel it made headlines around the world. The 20-year-old was killed along with fellow British backpacker Tom Jackson, who heroically came to Mia's aid.
Both had embarked on the 88-day farm work scheme in order to secure a second year in Australia on their 417 visa. Not long after Mia died, Rosie discovered widespread sexual, financial and psychological exploitation on the scheme and felt the need to act. She does not want Mia's death to be futile and is campaigning to make the 88-day farm work scheme safe for backpackers. She wants to ensure that no other parent lives through what she and the Jacksons have endured. We follow her story from the rolling hills of Derbyshire in the UK to the tiny Queensland town of Home Hill as she makes an emotional return to the hostel where her daughter died.

When Rosie Ayliffe's only child, Mia Ayliffe-Chung, was murdered last August in a Queensland backpacker hostel it made headlines around the world. The 20-year-old was killed along with fellow British backpacker Tom Jackson, who heroically came to Mia's aid.
Both had embarked on the 88-day farm work scheme in order to secure a second year in Australia on their 417 visa. Not long after Mia died, Rosie discovered widespread sexual, financial and psychological exploitation on the scheme and felt the need to act. She does not want Mia's death to be futile and is campaigning to make the 88-day farm work scheme safe for backpackers. She wants to ensure that no other parent lives through what she and the Jacksons have endured. We follow her story from the rolling hills of Derbyshire in the UK to the tiny Queensland town of Home Hill as she makes an emotional return to the hostel where her daughter died.

Is Trump's 'zero-tolerance' immigration policy violating human rights? In the days following Trump's U-turn, this program follows one family's fight to get their seven-year-old son back, after he was taken away at the border.
“Hug your son because you’re not going to see him anymore,”  Ludy Garcia was told at the U.S. Border.
Under President Trump’s Zero Tolerance Policy which took effect in April this year, immigrant children were housed in shelters, separated from their families, for an average of 41 days. Ludy’s 7-year-old son, Osmin, spent 51 days in detention between May and July this year.
Ludy and  Osmin are just two of the many victims of family separation at the U.S. border, who fled their homes under threats of gang violence and extortion.  
On April 6 2018, Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced a new policy for an "escalated effort to prosecute those who choose to illegally cross our border." 
Trump’s administration has directed federal prosecutors to prioritise immigration cases. Athough the policy does not explicitly call for the separation of parent and child, in practice, it does precisely that: While parents are taken to be prosecuted, their children are left with a sponsor or at a shelter.
Back home in Guatemala, mother Lesbia is at the family’s hut, eagerly awaiting her weekly phone call with Osmin – all she knows is that he has been taken to a shelter in Arizona.
“Every time I go to sleep, I pray for you,” Osmin sobs into the phone.

Dateline: Trump's Zero Tolerance

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
26:00
Is Trump's 'zero-tolerance' immigration policy violating human rights? In the days following Trump's U-turn, this program follows one family's fight to get their seven-year-old son back, after he was taken away at the border. “Hug your son because you’re not going to see him anymore,” Ludy Garcia was told at the U.S. Border. Under President Trump’s Zero Tolerance Policy which took effect in April this year, immigrant children were housed in shelters, separated from their families, for an average of 41 days. Ludy’s 7-year-old son, Osmin, spent 51 days in detention between May and July this year. Ludy and Osmin are just two of the many victims of family separation at the U.S. border, who fled their homes under threats of gang violence and extortion. On April 6 2018, Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced a new policy for an "escalated effort to prosecute those who choose to illegally cross our border." Trump’s administration has directed federal prosecutors to prioritise immigration cases. Athough the policy does not explicitly call for the separation of parent and child, in practice, it does precisely that: While parents are taken to be prosecuted, their children are left with a sponsor or at a shelter. Back home in Guatemala, mother Lesbia is at the family’s hut, eagerly awaiting her weekly phone call with Osmin – all she knows is that he has been taken to a shelter in Arizona. “Every time I go to sleep, I pray for you,” Osmin sobs into the phone.
Loading...