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7.30: Trevor Ruthenberg/ Lending Rules/ Tight Surveillance/ Chronic Fatigue Treatments/ Retirement Homes of the Future
Trevor Ruthenberg/ Lending Rules/ Tight Surveillance/ Chronic Fatigue Treatments/ Retirement Homes of the Future
ABC  |  July 18, 2018
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Trevor Ruthenberg
7.30's political correspondent Laura Tingle speaks to the LNP candidate in the Longman by-election, Trevor Ruthenberg, who apologised after wrongly claiming he won the Australian Service Medal.
Banks moving to tighten lending rules
With Royal Commission exposing examples of banks underestimating people's household expenditure and waving through loans in order to hit mortgage targets, lenders are now tightening the rules on handing out mortgage cash. But for some families it's come too late to save them from financial distress.
Government considers tighten surveillance on convicted terrorists
The Federal government is considering tightening surveillance on convicted terrorists once they've served their time behind bars. It's looking at what they are calling Extended Supervision Orders for people convicted of terrorist-related offences who are released from prison but still deemed to be a threat to the community. Director of Terrorism Studies at Charles Sturt University, Levi West, discusses what it means.
Chronic fatigue treatments
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, now called MECFS, is being investigated by a government appointed committee. There are about 200,000 Australian sufferers of the condition, which has no definitive cause or diagnostic test, but does have an often recommended treatment which some say risks harm and is "old fashioned". Their concern is that the specialist recommending this controversial treatment is advising the government committee on future treatment.

Retirement homes of the future
Australia's greying population means that by the middle of this century one in four of us will be aged 65 or over. It's already caused a boom in investment in retirement and aged care options, as businesses look for new ways to capture the ageing market. Many are thinking outside the square with new approaches, that are making old-fashioned retirement villages and nursing homes a thing of the past.

Trevor Ruthenberg
7.30's political correspondent Laura Tingle speaks to the LNP candidate in the Longman by-election, Trevor Ruthenberg, who apologised after wrongly claiming he won the Australian Service Medal.
Banks moving to tighten lending rules
With Royal Commission exposing examples of banks underestimating people's household expenditure and waving through loans in order to hit mortgage targets, lenders are now tightening the rules on handing out mortgage cash. But for some families it's come too late to save them from financial distress.
Government considers tighten surveillance on convicted terrorists
The Federal government is considering tightening surveillance on convicted terrorists once they've served their time behind bars. It's looking at what they are calling Extended Supervision Orders for people convicted of terrorist-related offences who are released from prison but still deemed to be a threat to the community. Director of Terrorism Studies at Charles Sturt University, Levi West, discusses what it means.
Chronic fatigue treatments
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, now called MECFS, is being investigated by a government appointed committee. There are about 200,000 Australian sufferers of the condition, which has no definitive cause or diagnostic test, but does have an often recommended treatment which some say risks harm and is "old fashioned". Their concern is that the specialist recommending this controversial treatment is advising the government committee on future treatment.

Retirement homes of the future
Australia's greying population means that by the middle of this century one in four of us will be aged 65 or over. It's already caused a boom in investment in retirement and aged care options, as businesses look for new ways to capture the ageing market. Many are thinking outside the square with new approaches, that are making old-fashioned retirement villages and nursing homes a thing of the past.

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