Teacher shortage

Community clip

Teacher shortage

Clip from 7.30  |  ABC  |  November 28, 2018
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This video has closed captioning

Leigh Sales addresses the issue of shortage of teachers all over Australia especially in areas and subjects where needed most.

Leigh Sales addresses the issue of shortage of teachers all over Australia especially in areas and subjects where needed most.

Community clip
India claims a dramatic win 
Despite dogged resistance from Australia's tail, India has taken an historic early lead in the four Test series after snatching victory in the opening match by 31 runs. It's just the sixth time India has won a Test on Australian soil.
Commentator Andrew Moore takes a look at a dramatic final day.
Are we overlooking the role of the public sector in the economy?
Mariana Mazzucato is something of a rockstar in the world of global economics. She's written two best-sellers arguing that it's actually the public sector which has made the crucial investments that have transformed the world economy. In Australia for a series of public lectures, she sat down to talk with Laura Tingle.

Sanjeev Gupta unveils plans for Whyalla
It's rare to see the Prime Minister and Opposition leader at the same press conference, but both were present in South Australia today as British billionaire Sanjeev Gupta unveiled his plans for a massive new steelworks project that will revive the town of Whyalla.

Remembering the 1966 helicopter crash 
The 11th of December marks the anniversary of a tragic accident over Sydney Harbour that changed our aviation safety laws. On that day in 1966 a helicopter chartered by the ABC ran into technical problems mid flight and crashed into the Sydney CBD. Remarkably the accident was filmed by two cameras, including one capturing the haunting last moments inside the ill-fated helicopter. And a warning, this report contains images some viewers may find distressing.

What is the future of Australia's housing market?
For years it seemed that property prices would rise for ever. But not any more. We are now in what the Reserve Bank governor has called "uncharted territory", where property prices are falling in our two biggest cities, even though unemployment is stable and the economy is growing.

7.30: December 10, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
29:43
India claims a dramatic win Despite dogged resistance from Australia's tail, India has taken an historic early lead in the four Test series after snatching victory in the opening match by 31 runs. It's just the sixth time India has won a Test on Australian soil. Commentator Andrew Moore takes a look at a dramatic final day. Are we overlooking the role of the public sector in the economy? Mariana Mazzucato is something of a rockstar in the world of global economics. She's written two best-sellers arguing that it's actually the public sector which has made the crucial investments that have transformed the world economy. In Australia for a series of public lectures, she sat down to talk with Laura Tingle. Sanjeev Gupta unveils plans for Whyalla It's rare to see the Prime Minister and Opposition leader at the same press conference, but both were present in South Australia today as British billionaire Sanjeev Gupta unveiled his plans for a massive new steelworks project that will revive the town of Whyalla. Remembering the 1966 helicopter crash The 11th of December marks the anniversary of a tragic accident over Sydney Harbour that changed our aviation safety laws. On that day in 1966 a helicopter chartered by the ABC ran into technical problems mid flight and crashed into the Sydney CBD. Remarkably the accident was filmed by two cameras, including one capturing the haunting last moments inside the ill-fated helicopter. And a warning, this report contains images some viewers may find distressing. What is the future of Australia's housing market? For years it seemed that property prices would rise for ever. But not any more. We are now in what the Reserve Bank governor has called "uncharted territory", where property prices are falling in our two biggest cities, even though unemployment is stable and the economy is growing.
Major parties clash over discrimination bill
The second last day of federal parliament for the year and the level of frenzy rose considerably. Asylum seekers, energy and the economy were all being debated, but it was the issue of discrimination against gay students attending religious schools, that had the government and opposition in fiercest combat.

Ita Buttrose gives advice to her younger self
When Ita Buttrose started Cleo magazine in 1972, it was the first time a women's publication was frank about sexuality and it went on to become a huge success. That was just the beginning for a woman who's paved the way for women in journalism ever since. Now Ita Buttrose shares her wisdom in our 'advice to my younger self' series.

Chris Dawson 
Renee Simms, the niece of Lynette Dawson, talks about the arrest of Chris Murphy, who is expected to be charged with the murder of his wife 36 years ago.
 
Reverse mortgages leaving the elderly high and dry
Reverse mortgages are touted as a way to unlock equity in the family home by borrowing against the asset without needing to make repayments until the house is sold or the owner moves out or dies. But a number of banks, including Australia's biggest lender the Commonwealth Bank, are now getting out of the reverse mortgage market, in the face of criticism from the peak financial regulator, ASIC.
Closing Europe's biggest steel works
In the south of Italy, a major corruption trial is underway that is pitting a local community against Europe's biggest steelworks, the Ilva plant in Taranto. The pollution from the plant is so bad it has been blamed in official government reports for the deaths of almost 400 local residents. The former owners of the company have been accused of crimes against public safety.

7.30: December 5, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
30:36
Major parties clash over discrimination bill The second last day of federal parliament for the year and the level of frenzy rose considerably. Asylum seekers, energy and the economy were all being debated, but it was the issue of discrimination against gay students attending religious schools, that had the government and opposition in fiercest combat. Ita Buttrose gives advice to her younger self When Ita Buttrose started Cleo magazine in 1972, it was the first time a women's publication was frank about sexuality and it went on to become a huge success. That was just the beginning for a woman who's paved the way for women in journalism ever since. Now Ita Buttrose shares her wisdom in our 'advice to my younger self' series. Chris Dawson Renee Simms, the niece of Lynette Dawson, talks about the arrest of Chris Murphy, who is expected to be charged with the murder of his wife 36 years ago. Reverse mortgages leaving the elderly high and dry Reverse mortgages are touted as a way to unlock equity in the family home by borrowing against the asset without needing to make repayments until the house is sold or the owner moves out or dies. But a number of banks, including Australia's biggest lender the Commonwealth Bank, are now getting out of the reverse mortgage market, in the face of criticism from the peak financial regulator, ASIC. Closing Europe's biggest steel works In the south of Italy, a major corruption trial is underway that is pitting a local community against Europe's biggest steelworks, the Ilva plant in Taranto. The pollution from the plant is so bad it has been blamed in official government reports for the deaths of almost 400 local residents. The former owners of the company have been accused of crimes against public safety.
Malcolm Turnbull 
There is only one week left of parliament but it is going to be a long week for the Prime Minister. The Liberal party's bitter in-fighting is continuing with the former Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull weighing in to a controversial pre-selection.
ABC journalist 
There's been a lot of focus on women in politics lately and, adding to some of the controversy, today ABC journalist Patricia Karvelas was ejected from Parliament's press gallery. Her crime? Wearing a top which showed too much of her arms.

Gangland investigations
The Victorian Premier has announced a Royal Commission into the way police have handled several high profile gangland investigations, after suppression orders were lifted on a case which showed Victoria Police had recruited a criminal lawyer to report on her own clients. Crime reporter and author, Andrew Rule, says some of the state's most notorious criminals including drug lord Tony Mokbel could now appeal against their convictions.

What is it like being a parent with a disability?
When ABC producer Eliza Hull became pregnant with her daughter, she took a crash course in parenting. As a person with disability, she found the available information often patronising and inaccurate. So she set out to share the genuine experiences of parents with disabilities.

7.30 takes a look at Stuart Robert's business dealings
One of the newer members of Scott Morrison's new ministry is Stuart Robert, the assistant treasurer. He serves in one of the most important roles in government, overseeing the corporate watchdog ASIC. It's a big comeback after his resignation from Malcolm Turnbull's ministry in 2016 but he's found himself at the centre of some unwanted attention in recent months over some of his business dealings.

Former US President George HW Bush dies
This week the body of former president George Bush will lie in state in the U.S. capitol building ahead of a state funeral on Thursday.

7.30: December 3, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
29:21
Malcolm Turnbull There is only one week left of parliament but it is going to be a long week for the Prime Minister. The Liberal party's bitter in-fighting is continuing with the former Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull weighing in to a controversial pre-selection. ABC journalist There's been a lot of focus on women in politics lately and, adding to some of the controversy, today ABC journalist Patricia Karvelas was ejected from Parliament's press gallery. Her crime? Wearing a top which showed too much of her arms. Gangland investigations The Victorian Premier has announced a Royal Commission into the way police have handled several high profile gangland investigations, after suppression orders were lifted on a case which showed Victoria Police had recruited a criminal lawyer to report on her own clients. Crime reporter and author, Andrew Rule, says some of the state's most notorious criminals including drug lord Tony Mokbel could now appeal against their convictions. What is it like being a parent with a disability? When ABC producer Eliza Hull became pregnant with her daughter, she took a crash course in parenting. As a person with disability, she found the available information often patronising and inaccurate. So she set out to share the genuine experiences of parents with disabilities. 7.30 takes a look at Stuart Robert's business dealings One of the newer members of Scott Morrison's new ministry is Stuart Robert, the assistant treasurer. He serves in one of the most important roles in government, overseeing the corporate watchdog ASIC. It's a big comeback after his resignation from Malcolm Turnbull's ministry in 2016 but he's found himself at the centre of some unwanted attention in recent months over some of his business dealings. Former US President George HW Bush dies This week the body of former president George Bush will lie in state in the U.S. capitol building ahead of a state funeral on Thursday.
Catastrophic Queensland bushfires
It's been a catastrophic start to the bushfire season in Queensland with record temperatures and unprecedented fires. Authorities are warning there are least 5 more days of extreme weather ahead and there are still more than 100 fires still burning, mainly in central Queensland, forcing more communities to evacuate
Brexit looms
British politics is swirling over whether the Prime Minister's Brexit deal will be rejected by the parliament and whether the country will be forced to hold a second referendum. But while the politicians battle it out, the looming deadline is having an unexpected impact on one particular group - families that fled Nazi Germany.
Kerryn Phelps
The new independent member for Wentworth, Dr Kerryn Phelps has wasted no time in making her presence felt in Canberra, introducing a private member's bill to remove children from detention in Nauru.
My Health Record
The government has extended the 'my health record' opt out deadline to the end of January. And it's been busy making some changes to the system to address peoples' concerns about privacy.
Minority government
It's been a wild first week of minority government in Canberra, ending with the government narrowly surviving a test of its numbers in the House of Representatives. Chief political correspondent Laura Tingle takes a look.
Satirist Mark Humphries
The Prime Minister has denounced a strike for action on climate change organised by school children. Now 7.30 has obtained a video message from the Coalition to the students, courtesy of satirist Mark Humphries.

7.30: November 29, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
31:31
Catastrophic Queensland bushfires It's been a catastrophic start to the bushfire season in Queensland with record temperatures and unprecedented fires. Authorities are warning there are least 5 more days of extreme weather ahead and there are still more than 100 fires still burning, mainly in central Queensland, forcing more communities to evacuate Brexit looms British politics is swirling over whether the Prime Minister's Brexit deal will be rejected by the parliament and whether the country will be forced to hold a second referendum. But while the politicians battle it out, the looming deadline is having an unexpected impact on one particular group - families that fled Nazi Germany. Kerryn Phelps The new independent member for Wentworth, Dr Kerryn Phelps has wasted no time in making her presence felt in Canberra, introducing a private member's bill to remove children from detention in Nauru. My Health Record The government has extended the 'my health record' opt out deadline to the end of January. And it's been busy making some changes to the system to address peoples' concerns about privacy. Minority government It's been a wild first week of minority government in Canberra, ending with the government narrowly surviving a test of its numbers in the House of Representatives. Chief political correspondent Laura Tingle takes a look. Satirist Mark Humphries The Prime Minister has denounced a strike for action on climate change organised by school children. Now 7.30 has obtained a video message from the Coalition to the students, courtesy of satirist Mark Humphries.
Catastrophic Queensland Bushfires
More than 130 bushfires are burning across Queensland and 8,000 residents of Gracemere have been advised to evacuate their homes. Local MP Brittany Lauga describes the situation around Rockhampton.

Cullen Group 
The building industry is coming under increasing scrutiny with investigations into two recent company collapses. In one instance the Queensland building regulator brushed aside warning signs that one of those companies was in deep financial trouble nine months before it went into liquidation. And there are increasing calls on the federal corporate regulator, ASIC, to intervene and stamp out illegal practices.

 Julia Banks 
The government has spent the day cleaning up after yesterday's shock resignation of Julia Banks from the Liberal Party and her move to the crossbenches. And it defended its decision to have just 10 sitting days before next year's budget.

Australia facing battle over quality and quantity of teachers
When you send your kids to school, you want them to be educated by the best and brightest teachers but attracting and keeping those people is a major challenge. Australia has looming teacher shortage combined with a booming student population. So, what's the solution?

Missy Higgins 
Over the course of her career, singer-songwriter Missy Higgins has had many hits and won a swag of awards. But it hasn't always been that way, and here she offers her younger self some advice.

7.30: November 28, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
30:55
Catastrophic Queensland Bushfires More than 130 bushfires are burning across Queensland and 8,000 residents of Gracemere have been advised to evacuate their homes. Local MP Brittany Lauga describes the situation around Rockhampton. Cullen Group The building industry is coming under increasing scrutiny with investigations into two recent company collapses. In one instance the Queensland building regulator brushed aside warning signs that one of those companies was in deep financial trouble nine months before it went into liquidation. And there are increasing calls on the federal corporate regulator, ASIC, to intervene and stamp out illegal practices. Julia Banks The government has spent the day cleaning up after yesterday's shock resignation of Julia Banks from the Liberal Party and her move to the crossbenches. And it defended its decision to have just 10 sitting days before next year's budget. Australia facing battle over quality and quantity of teachers When you send your kids to school, you want them to be educated by the best and brightest teachers but attracting and keeping those people is a major challenge. Australia has looming teacher shortage combined with a booming student population. So, what's the solution? Missy Higgins Over the course of her career, singer-songwriter Missy Higgins has had many hits and won a swag of awards. But it hasn't always been that way, and here she offers her younger self some advice.
Victorian election
The Andrews Labor government is fighting hold onto power in Victoria in this weekend's state election. The ABC's election analyst, Antony Green, takes a look at how things may unfold.

Silicosis outbreak
Over the past three months, 7.30 has revealed a health crisis among workers cutting artificial stone kitchen benchtops. Dozens of cases of the potentially deadly lung disease silicosis were first identified in Queensland, before even more cases emerged in New South Wales, the ACT and Victoria. It has now become so bad an international health expert has called for urgent medical testing of the entire workforce.

How much do political parties know about you?
Political parties know more about you than you may realise. Parties are looking for whatever edge they can get, and increasingly, that edge comes in the form of personal data. While the use of this data is still in its infancy in this country, its potential is huge.

Jarrod Lyle's legacy
In August Australian golfer Jarrod Lyle lost his third battle against a cancer he was first diagnosed with two decades earlier. His death shocked both the other professionals and his many fans. His widow Briony is continuing her husband's work raising money for families living with cancer through the charity, Challenge.

Labor's new energy policy
For more than a decade, energy policy has been a headache for both sides of politics. Shadow Minister for Climate Change and Energy Mark Butler discusses Labor's newly unveiled the energy policy, which they will take to the next election.

7.30: November 22, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
30:47
Victorian election The Andrews Labor government is fighting hold onto power in Victoria in this weekend's state election. The ABC's election analyst, Antony Green, takes a look at how things may unfold. Silicosis outbreak Over the past three months, 7.30 has revealed a health crisis among workers cutting artificial stone kitchen benchtops. Dozens of cases of the potentially deadly lung disease silicosis were first identified in Queensland, before even more cases emerged in New South Wales, the ACT and Victoria. It has now become so bad an international health expert has called for urgent medical testing of the entire workforce. How much do political parties know about you? Political parties know more about you than you may realise. Parties are looking for whatever edge they can get, and increasingly, that edge comes in the form of personal data. While the use of this data is still in its infancy in this country, its potential is huge. Jarrod Lyle's legacy In August Australian golfer Jarrod Lyle lost his third battle against a cancer he was first diagnosed with two decades earlier. His death shocked both the other professionals and his many fans. His widow Briony is continuing her husband's work raising money for families living with cancer through the charity, Challenge. Labor's new energy policy For more than a decade, energy policy has been a headache for both sides of politics. Shadow Minister for Climate Change and Energy Mark Butler discusses Labor's newly unveiled the energy policy, which they will take to the next election.
Illegal Logging
Government-owned logging company, VicForest has been accused of illegally logging in endangered ecosystems. That logging is contributing to the decline of some of the country's threatened species and destroying some of the last untouched forests in Victoria.

The fall of small mechanics
The car you probably driving today is in effect a highly sophisticated computer and that means fixing cars requires technical information and computer codes. Australia's consumer watchdog, the ACCC, has found that car makers are often reluctant to share that information, pushing up the price of repairs and servicing.

New activist group to challenge Get Up!
A new activist group wants to influence your vote at the next election and is throwing a lot of money at it. Advance Australia has been started by a group of conservative business leaders on a mission to challenge the powerful left-wing lobby group, Get Up!rs and servicing.

Cate McGregor's advice to her younger self
As part of our series of Australians offering advice to their younger selves, Cate McGregor looks back on her eclectic career in the military, politics and cricket. She is also now one of Australia's highest-profile transgender advocates.

Celebrating 50 years of life with muscular dystrophy
Turning 50 is a big deal for anyone, but it's especially significant for Andrew Taylor. At seven he was diagnosed with a form of muscular dystrophy, and doctors didn't expect him to live much beyond his teens.

7.30: November 21, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
29:35
Illegal Logging Government-owned logging company, VicForest has been accused of illegally logging in endangered ecosystems. That logging is contributing to the decline of some of the country's threatened species and destroying some of the last untouched forests in Victoria. The fall of small mechanics The car you probably driving today is in effect a highly sophisticated computer and that means fixing cars requires technical information and computer codes. Australia's consumer watchdog, the ACCC, has found that car makers are often reluctant to share that information, pushing up the price of repairs and servicing. New activist group to challenge Get Up! A new activist group wants to influence your vote at the next election and is throwing a lot of money at it. Advance Australia has been started by a group of conservative business leaders on a mission to challenge the powerful left-wing lobby group, Get Up!rs and servicing. Cate McGregor's advice to her younger self As part of our series of Australians offering advice to their younger selves, Cate McGregor looks back on her eclectic career in the military, politics and cricket. She is also now one of Australia's highest-profile transgender advocates. Celebrating 50 years of life with muscular dystrophy Turning 50 is a big deal for anyone, but it's especially significant for Andrew Taylor. At seven he was diagnosed with a form of muscular dystrophy, and doctors didn't expect him to live much beyond his teens.
The Assassins are a legend in the Muslim world. Part freedom fighters, part special forces and part Islamic fundamentalists, they were set up back in the 11th century in today's Syria around the time of the First Christian Crusade in the Holy Land. They were an elite sect of highly trained killers who often operated behind enemy lines, in deep cover, assassinating military leaders and rulers. Their covert tactics and ruthless operations spread fear and terror across the medieval world. Assassinations were primarily carried out with a dagger, which was sometimes tipped with poison. As their legend and infamy grew they started to carry out their assassinations in public spaces so as to instil terror in their foes. They would often assimilate themselves in the cities, palaces and fortresses of their targets and, over time, stealthily insert themselves into strategic positions. Although many scholars believe that they died out after the Crusades, there are those who say that they simply went 'underground' with reports of their activities in the early 20th century. Certainly, the Assassins have inspired, and possibly given rise to, many of today's Islamic fundamentalist groups, including the Taliban in Afghanistan, Al Qaeda and even ISIS. The training methods, secrecy, ruthlessness and covert operations of all these groups are directly the result of The Assassins.

Inside Secret Societies: The Order of the Assassins

Ethical understanding, Critical thinking

Years 11-12 Ethical understanding, Critical thinking
45:10
The Assassins are a legend in the Muslim world. Part freedom fighters, part special forces and part Islamic fundamentalists, they were set up back in the 11th century in today's Syria around the time of the First Christian Crusade in the Holy Land. They were an elite sect of highly trained killers who often operated behind enemy lines, in deep cover, assassinating military leaders and rulers. Their covert tactics and ruthless operations spread fear and terror across the medieval world. Assassinations were primarily carried out with a dagger, which was sometimes tipped with poison. As their legend and infamy grew they started to carry out their assassinations in public spaces so as to instil terror in their foes. They would often assimilate themselves in the cities, palaces and fortresses of their targets and, over time, stealthily insert themselves into strategic positions. Although many scholars believe that they died out after the Crusades, there are those who say that they simply went 'underground' with reports of their activities in the early 20th century. Certainly, the Assassins have inspired, and possibly given rise to, many of today's Islamic fundamentalist groups, including the Taliban in Afghanistan, Al Qaeda and even ISIS. The training methods, secrecy, ruthlessness and covert operations of all these groups are directly the result of The Assassins.
With its origins in the Samurai culture of 17th century Japan, the Yakusa are one of the most infamous, secret and feared of all Asian secret societies. They call themselves a 'chivalrous organisation', and are notorious for their strict codes of conduct and highly organised structure, with an estimated 100,000 members today. They started as hired security men for local festivals, markets and gambling dens, before slowly growing in power and prestige. Today they are a vast organisation and their leaders, known as Oyabun, maintain strict rules within the ranks. No disloyalty is permitted. Yubitsume, or the cutting off of a finger, is a form of penance or apology. Upon a first offence, the transgressor must cut off the tip of his left little finger and give the severed portion to his boss. Its origin stems from the traditional way of holding a Japanese sword. The removal of digits starting with the little finger moving up the hand to the index finger progressively weakens a person's sword grip. Many Yakusa have full-body tattoos known as Irezumi which are often "hand-poked", that is, the ink is inserted beneath the skin using non-electrical, handmade and hand-held tools with needles of sharpened bamboo or steel. The Yakusa are a very powerful organisation in Japan who's tentacles of influence reach the very highest levels of power. Drawing on their rich Samurai heritage they believe they can operate above and beyond modern laws and government, bringing what they see as a purer form of justice and control to a corrupt country.

Inside Secret Societies: The Yakuza

Ethical understanding, Critical thinking

Years 11-12 Ethical understanding, Critical thinking
46:00
With its origins in the Samurai culture of 17th century Japan, the Yakusa are one of the most infamous, secret and feared of all Asian secret societies. They call themselves a 'chivalrous organisation', and are notorious for their strict codes of conduct and highly organised structure, with an estimated 100,000 members today. They started as hired security men for local festivals, markets and gambling dens, before slowly growing in power and prestige. Today they are a vast organisation and their leaders, known as Oyabun, maintain strict rules within the ranks. No disloyalty is permitted. Yubitsume, or the cutting off of a finger, is a form of penance or apology. Upon a first offence, the transgressor must cut off the tip of his left little finger and give the severed portion to his boss. Its origin stems from the traditional way of holding a Japanese sword. The removal of digits starting with the little finger moving up the hand to the index finger progressively weakens a person's sword grip. Many Yakusa have full-body tattoos known as Irezumi which are often "hand-poked", that is, the ink is inserted beneath the skin using non-electrical, handmade and hand-held tools with needles of sharpened bamboo or steel. The Yakusa are a very powerful organisation in Japan who's tentacles of influence reach the very highest levels of power. Drawing on their rich Samurai heritage they believe they can operate above and beyond modern laws and government, bringing what they see as a purer form of justice and control to a corrupt country.
Hitler and the key officers of the Nazi High Command were all members of three main secret societies which had a strong belief in the occult; the Vril Society, the Thule society and the Ahnenerbe. The Vril Society was based on a novel written in 1871 by Edward Bulwer-Lytton called The Power of the Coming Race which talks of a superior subterranean master race and the energy-form called "Vril" which powers UFO's from hidden bases beneath the arctic ice. It sounds crazy but Hitler, Himmler and other leading Nazis took it very seriously. The Thule Society was named after a mythical northern country from Greek legend which was the origins of the "Aryan Race", also thought to have been the mythical Atlantis. It had about 2000 members, insisting on intense loyalty and secrecy, as well pure white blood, "untainted" by any other race, or colour. This belief in the Aryan race and its connection to Atlantis led to the foundation of the Ahnenerbe by Heinrich Himmler to research the archaeological and racial heritage of the Aryan race. It conducted experiments and launched expeditions in an attempt to find the lost city of Atlantis, and prove that mythological Aryan populations had once ruled the world. Although the Vril and Thule societies, as well as the Ahnenerbe were officially disbanded at the end of World War ll, there are reports that they continued for many decades afterwards through surviving Nazi officers in Europe, America and South America. Today, it's believed that several Neo-Nazi groups made up of descendants of former German soldiers, politicians and new, younger recruits, keep the flame alive, with regular meetings, and the same beliefs.

Inside Secret Societies: Nazi Occult Societies

Ethical understanding, Critical thinking

Years 11-12 Ethical understanding, Critical thinking
46:58
Hitler and the key officers of the Nazi High Command were all members of three main secret societies which had a strong belief in the occult; the Vril Society, the Thule society and the Ahnenerbe. The Vril Society was based on a novel written in 1871 by Edward Bulwer-Lytton called The Power of the Coming Race which talks of a superior subterranean master race and the energy-form called "Vril" which powers UFO's from hidden bases beneath the arctic ice. It sounds crazy but Hitler, Himmler and other leading Nazis took it very seriously. The Thule Society was named after a mythical northern country from Greek legend which was the origins of the "Aryan Race", also thought to have been the mythical Atlantis. It had about 2000 members, insisting on intense loyalty and secrecy, as well pure white blood, "untainted" by any other race, or colour. This belief in the Aryan race and its connection to Atlantis led to the foundation of the Ahnenerbe by Heinrich Himmler to research the archaeological and racial heritage of the Aryan race. It conducted experiments and launched expeditions in an attempt to find the lost city of Atlantis, and prove that mythological Aryan populations had once ruled the world. Although the Vril and Thule societies, as well as the Ahnenerbe were officially disbanded at the end of World War ll, there are reports that they continued for many decades afterwards through surviving Nazi officers in Europe, America and South America. Today, it's believed that several Neo-Nazi groups made up of descendants of former German soldiers, politicians and new, younger recruits, keep the flame alive, with regular meetings, and the same beliefs.
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