7.30

7.30

October 11, 2018
ABC  |  October 11, 2018

Conflict over religious freedom report threatens to split Coalition
The warring forces within the federal Coalition have been notably silent in recent weeks, with all sides only too aware that such divisions could torpedo the chances their chances in the Wentworth by-election. But that peace was shattered today by the leaking of some details of a tightly-held report on proposed changes to religious freedom laws. The Australian Financial Review's political editor Phil Coorey discusses the latest developments.
James Clapper assesses tension in the South China Sea
Former US Director of National Intelligence, James Clapper, takes a look at what is happening in the South China Sea.
Tensions rise between China and the US
Tensions are rising between the world's two biggest economies. The tough talks follows last week's incident in the South China Sea, where warships from the United States and China came within 45 metres of colliding. The US is already locked in a trade war with Beijing and the US President has accused China of meddling in its upcoming elections.
Spike in silicosis cases
Silicosis is a potentially deadly lung disease mostly associated with the coal mining industry. But there has been a silicosis outbreak in Queensland among tradesmen who make kitchen and bathroom bench tops with engineered stone. Some of those workers and the medical profession are sounding the alarm about what they fear could become a public health emergency.
Richard Branson's personal appeal
The executions of convicted drug smugglers Andrew Chan and Myuran Sukumaran in Indonesia in 2015 shocked Australia. But they also attracted global interest - including from some unlikely places. Virgin founder Sir Richard Branson is a passionate campaigner against the death penalty and made a personal appeal to Indonesia's president at the time to spare the couple.

Conflict over religious freedom report threatens to split Coalition
The warring forces within the federal Coalition have been notably silent in recent weeks, with all sides only too aware that such divisions could torpedo the chances their chances in the Wentworth by-election. But that peace was shattered today by the leaking of some details of a tightly-held report on proposed changes to religious freedom laws. The Australian Financial Review's political editor Phil Coorey discusses the latest developments.
James Clapper assesses tension in the South China Sea
Former US Director of National Intelligence, James Clapper, takes a look at what is happening in the South China Sea.
Tensions rise between China and the US
Tensions are rising between the world's two biggest economies. The tough talks follows last week's incident in the South China Sea, where warships from the United States and China came within 45 metres of colliding. The US is already locked in a trade war with Beijing and the US President has accused China of meddling in its upcoming elections.
Spike in silicosis cases
Silicosis is a potentially deadly lung disease mostly associated with the coal mining industry. But there has been a silicosis outbreak in Queensland among tradesmen who make kitchen and bathroom bench tops with engineered stone. Some of those workers and the medical profession are sounding the alarm about what they fear could become a public health emergency.
Richard Branson's personal appeal
The executions of convicted drug smugglers Andrew Chan and Myuran Sukumaran in Indonesia in 2015 shocked Australia. But they also attracted global interest - including from some unlikely places. Virgin founder Sir Richard Branson is a passionate campaigner against the death penalty and made a personal appeal to Indonesia's president at the time to spare the couple.

Inside Lion Air's crash investigation
Indonesian air safety investigators have recovered one of the flight recorders from the Lion Air plane crash, moving a step closer to finding out what went wrong.
At the same time, Lion Air is conducting its own investigation . 7.30 was granted access to the airline's training facility – as the accident-prone airline attempts to recreate what went wrong during Monday's fateful flight.
Gideon Haigh explains why David Peever had to resign as Chairman of Cricket Australia
Cricket commentator and author, Gideon Haigh, discusses the resignation of David Peever as Chairman of Cricket Australia. It follows a week of pressure over the fallout from the ball tampering scandal.

Controversial gas project divides dying outback town
When South Australia's only coal fired power station closed in 2015 hundreds of jobs were lost and the small community where the coal came from was crippled.
Now a new gas project is offering the outback town of Leigh Creek a lifeline. The problem is the technology promising a new future has a problematic past in Queensland, where it's been banned.

Satirist Mark Humphries takes us behind the scenes to show us how to make a Prime Ministerial video.

Back out of the closet and onto the dance floor
Hundreds of members of the LGBTI community have gathered in central Melbourne for the second 'Coming Back Out Ball', which celebrates those who led the charge out of the closet. But behind the glitz and glamour, the event also addresses issues of social isolation, ageism and homophobia. (Picture supplied: Bryony Jackson/All the Queens Men)

7.30: November 1, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
28:55
Inside Lion Air's crash investigation Indonesian air safety investigators have recovered one of the flight recorders from the Lion Air plane crash, moving a step closer to finding out what went wrong. At the same time, Lion Air is conducting its own investigation . 7.30 was granted access to the airline's training facility – as the accident-prone airline attempts to recreate what went wrong during Monday's fateful flight. Gideon Haigh explains why David Peever had to resign as Chairman of Cricket Australia Cricket commentator and author, Gideon Haigh, discusses the resignation of David Peever as Chairman of Cricket Australia. It follows a week of pressure over the fallout from the ball tampering scandal. Controversial gas project divides dying outback town When South Australia's only coal fired power station closed in 2015 hundreds of jobs were lost and the small community where the coal came from was crippled. Now a new gas project is offering the outback town of Leigh Creek a lifeline. The problem is the technology promising a new future has a problematic past in Queensland, where it's been banned. Satirist Mark Humphries takes us behind the scenes to show us how to make a Prime Ministerial video. Back out of the closet and onto the dance floor Hundreds of members of the LGBTI community have gathered in central Melbourne for the second 'Coming Back Out Ball', which celebrates those who led the charge out of the closet. But behind the glitz and glamour, the event also addresses issues of social isolation, ageism and homophobia. (Picture supplied: Bryony Jackson/All the Queens Men)
Meet the Kansas governor candidate described as 'Trump before Trump'
With US mid-term elections on next week, Republicans are desperately trying to hold onto their majority as Democrats gain ground in traditionally conservative states. As well as voting for Congress, they're deciding the Governorships of their states. And this year all eyes are on the race in Kansas, where Kris Kobach, a man described as a 'mini Trump' is running on an anti-immigrant agenda.
Former High Court Judge Michael Kirby shares his wisdom for Year 12 students
This week 7.30 has heard from some wonderful Australians offering advice for year 12 students sitting end of school exams. In the final instalment, former High Court Judge Michael Kirby shares his wisdom.
Grieving dad fulfils triathlon promise to wife and son who died of brain cancer
Leigh Chivers lost both his wife, Sara, and son, Alfie, to brain cancer within six months of each other. Now he's fulfilled a promise he made to his wife and also a life long dream, by completing the gruelling Hawaiian Ironman.
The real cost of becoming a cashless Australia
Carrying cash is fast becoming a thing of the past. While digital payments are more convenient for many of us, it's making life difficult for buskers, the homeless and charities who collect on the streets. The Salvation Army has adopted paypass, and The Big Issue magazine is about to switch to tap-n-go in a bid to stay afloat.
The incredible reality for young carers
One in eight people in Australia are carers for family members who are sick, disabled, frail or have an addiction. And it's not just adults, more than 275,000 Australian children are caring for parents or siblings. They're juggling burdens that would be challenging for adults to manage and, as a consequence, they face a serious risk of long-term disadvantage.

7.30: October 31, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
30:41
Meet the Kansas governor candidate described as 'Trump before Trump' With US mid-term elections on next week, Republicans are desperately trying to hold onto their majority as Democrats gain ground in traditionally conservative states. As well as voting for Congress, they're deciding the Governorships of their states. And this year all eyes are on the race in Kansas, where Kris Kobach, a man described as a 'mini Trump' is running on an anti-immigrant agenda. Former High Court Judge Michael Kirby shares his wisdom for Year 12 students This week 7.30 has heard from some wonderful Australians offering advice for year 12 students sitting end of school exams. In the final instalment, former High Court Judge Michael Kirby shares his wisdom. Grieving dad fulfils triathlon promise to wife and son who died of brain cancer Leigh Chivers lost both his wife, Sara, and son, Alfie, to brain cancer within six months of each other. Now he's fulfilled a promise he made to his wife and also a life long dream, by completing the gruelling Hawaiian Ironman. The real cost of becoming a cashless Australia Carrying cash is fast becoming a thing of the past. While digital payments are more convenient for many of us, it's making life difficult for buskers, the homeless and charities who collect on the streets. The Salvation Army has adopted paypass, and The Big Issue magazine is about to switch to tap-n-go in a bid to stay afloat. The incredible reality for young carers One in eight people in Australia are carers for family members who are sick, disabled, frail or have an addiction. And it's not just adults, more than 275,000 Australian children are caring for parents or siblings. They're juggling burdens that would be challenging for adults to manage and, as a consequence, they face a serious risk of long-term disadvantage.
The man who broke Watergate talks about Donald Trump
Donald Trump may have popularised the term 'fake news', but the wild nature of his presidency has also spawned an extraordinary series of insider accounts of his chaotic White House. The latest and most substantial of these is 'Fear' by veteran Washington reporter Bob Woodward.
Young women and injuries
The introduction of an AFL women's competition, the rise of the Matildas, and the increasing popularity of women's cricket all reflect a huge increase in the popularity of women's team sport. But with this surge has come a significant increase in serious knee injuries. Women are up to ten times more likely to rupture their anterior cruciate ligament than men, and Australia has the highest rate of knee reconstructions in the world.
Energy distributors push for a cap on solar power
More than six solar panels are installed across Australia every minute of every day as people try to tackle rising power prices. But the industry that owns Australia's poles and wires says all that power from the sun is a problem and it could destabilise the electricity grid. The solar industry disagrees, and it's preparing for a fight with the power networks.
Asian elephants under threat 
The Asian elephant is one of the world's most majestic animals. But now these gentle giants face a threat that could wipe them out completely … poachers who want their skin.

7.30: October 15, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
29:08
The man who broke Watergate talks about Donald Trump Donald Trump may have popularised the term 'fake news', but the wild nature of his presidency has also spawned an extraordinary series of insider accounts of his chaotic White House. The latest and most substantial of these is 'Fear' by veteran Washington reporter Bob Woodward. Young women and injuries The introduction of an AFL women's competition, the rise of the Matildas, and the increasing popularity of women's cricket all reflect a huge increase in the popularity of women's team sport. But with this surge has come a significant increase in serious knee injuries. Women are up to ten times more likely to rupture their anterior cruciate ligament than men, and Australia has the highest rate of knee reconstructions in the world. Energy distributors push for a cap on solar power More than six solar panels are installed across Australia every minute of every day as people try to tackle rising power prices. But the industry that owns Australia's poles and wires says all that power from the sun is a problem and it could destabilise the electricity grid. The solar industry disagrees, and it's preparing for a fight with the power networks. Asian elephants under threat The Asian elephant is one of the world's most majestic animals. But now these gentle giants face a threat that could wipe them out completely … poachers who want their skin.
Religious Freedom
The warring forces within the federal Coalition have been notably silent in recent weeks, with all sides only too aware that such divisions could torpedo the chances their chances in the Wentworth by-election. But that peace was shattered today by the leaking of some details of a tightly-held report on proposed changes to religious freedom laws. The Australian Financial Review's political editor Phil Coorey discusses the latest developments.
South China Sea
Former US Director of National Intelligence, James Clapper, takes a look at what is happening in the South China Sea.
Tensions rise between China and the US
Tensions are rising between the world's two biggest economies. The tough talks follows last week's incident in the South China Sea, where warships from the United States and China came within 45 metres of colliding. The US is already locked in a trade war with Beijing and the US President has accused China of meddling in its upcoming elections.
Deadly dust
Silicosis is a potentially deadly lung disease mostly associated with the coal mining industry. But there has been a silicosis outbreak in Queensland among tradesmen who make kitchen and bathroom bench tops with engineered stone. Some of those workers and the medical profession are sounding the alarm about what they fear could become a public health emergency.
Richard Branson's personal appeal 
The executions of convicted drug smugglers Andrew Chan and Myuran Sukumaran in Indonesia in 2015 shocked Australia. But they also attracted global interest - including from some unlikely places. Virgin founder Sir Richard Branson is a passionate campaigner against the death penalty and made a personal appeal to Indonesia's president at the time to spare the couple.

7.30: October 10, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
31:07
Religious Freedom The warring forces within the federal Coalition have been notably silent in recent weeks, with all sides only too aware that such divisions could torpedo the chances their chances in the Wentworth by-election. But that peace was shattered today by the leaking of some details of a tightly-held report on proposed changes to religious freedom laws. The Australian Financial Review's political editor Phil Coorey discusses the latest developments. South China Sea Former US Director of National Intelligence, James Clapper, takes a look at what is happening in the South China Sea. Tensions rise between China and the US Tensions are rising between the world's two biggest economies. The tough talks follows last week's incident in the South China Sea, where warships from the United States and China came within 45 metres of colliding. The US is already locked in a trade war with Beijing and the US President has accused China of meddling in its upcoming elections. Deadly dust Silicosis is a potentially deadly lung disease mostly associated with the coal mining industry. But there has been a silicosis outbreak in Queensland among tradesmen who make kitchen and bathroom bench tops with engineered stone. Some of those workers and the medical profession are sounding the alarm about what they fear could become a public health emergency. Richard Branson's personal appeal The executions of convicted drug smugglers Andrew Chan and Myuran Sukumaran in Indonesia in 2015 shocked Australia. But they also attracted global interest - including from some unlikely places. Virgin founder Sir Richard Branson is a passionate campaigner against the death penalty and made a personal appeal to Indonesia's president at the time to spare the couple.
The Opera House: world heritage listed cultural precinct or Sydney's biggest billboard?
The decision to allow a horse race to be promoted on the Opera House sails has sparked outrage and questions reportedly being asked at UNESCO. But it's not just the Prime Minister who's defended the move. The NSW Premier and Racing NSW say the promotion is in line with previous sporting and cultural use building's sails. Former chief executive of the Sydney Opera House, Michael Lynch says the horse racing promotion proposed for the sails of the Opera House is 'highly inappropriate'.
Bill Hare discusses climate change report
The UN's intergovernmental panel on climate change released a report today which paints an alarming picture of the impact of a 2 per cent increase in global temperatures as a result of climate change. It says urgent and unprecedented action is needed to keep the increase to one and a half degrees. Dr Bill Hare of the CEO of Climate Analytics discusses what it means.
Alison Harcourt
Alison Harcourt may not be a household name, but the 88-year-old statistics pioneer is somewhat of a celebrity in some parts of the maths world. Her work has helped measure poverty in Australia and played a key role in amending the Electoral Act, and the octogenarian is still going strong and tutoring the next generation of young students.
Cable Beach
It's one of the most popular images in Australian tourism, camel trains silhouetted against a setting sun on Broome's Cable Beach. But there's trouble brewing in the remote paradise, as the camels share the beach with growing numbers of tourists and four wheel drive vehicles.

7.30: October 8, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
28:35
The Opera House: world heritage listed cultural precinct or Sydney's biggest billboard? The decision to allow a horse race to be promoted on the Opera House sails has sparked outrage and questions reportedly being asked at UNESCO. But it's not just the Prime Minister who's defended the move. The NSW Premier and Racing NSW say the promotion is in line with previous sporting and cultural use building's sails. Former chief executive of the Sydney Opera House, Michael Lynch says the horse racing promotion proposed for the sails of the Opera House is 'highly inappropriate'. Bill Hare discusses climate change report The UN's intergovernmental panel on climate change released a report today which paints an alarming picture of the impact of a 2 per cent increase in global temperatures as a result of climate change. It says urgent and unprecedented action is needed to keep the increase to one and a half degrees. Dr Bill Hare of the CEO of Climate Analytics discusses what it means. Alison Harcourt Alison Harcourt may not be a household name, but the 88-year-old statistics pioneer is somewhat of a celebrity in some parts of the maths world. Her work has helped measure poverty in Australia and played a key role in amending the Electoral Act, and the octogenarian is still going strong and tutoring the next generation of young students. Cable Beach It's one of the most popular images in Australian tourism, camel trains silhouetted against a setting sun on Broome's Cable Beach. But there's trouble brewing in the remote paradise, as the camels share the beach with growing numbers of tourists and four wheel drive vehicles.
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