7.30

7.30

March 14, 2018
ABC  |  March 14, 2018
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This video has closed captioning

Why Has Proposed Adani Coal Mine Stalled?
Despite meeting clearing all the environmental hurdles, Adani's controversial Carmichael coal mine is still not underway, with the now company admitting it won't meet it's own deadline to lock in financial backing for the mine. And it's frustrating the mine's supporters.

Astrophysicist Stephen Hawking Dies at 76
Brad Tucker talks about the life of Stephen Hawking, the man who the New York Times said "roamed the cosmos from a wheelchair, making discoveries that changed how we see the universe".

Trump Fires Secretary of State
Jason Zengerle, who has investigated the Donald Trump's relationship with Rex Tillerson for the New York Times Magazine, speaks to 7.30 about the secretary of state's departure from the White House

Insurance Insider Calls Out Industry on Mental Illness Policy
Every year, thousands of mentally ill Australians are forced through gruelling claims procedures in order to receive payouts from their insurance companies. Now one former insurance company executive says it's not good enough.

Report Finds Against Former Melbourne Lord Mayor
After a damming report made four adverse findings against former Melbourne Lord Mayor, Robert Doyle, one of the woman who made allegations of sexual harassment against him says she feels vindicated.

Why Has Proposed Adani Coal Mine Stalled?
Despite meeting clearing all the environmental hurdles, Adani's controversial Carmichael coal mine is still not underway, with the now company admitting it won't meet it's own deadline to lock in financial backing for the mine. And it's frustrating the mine's supporters.

Astrophysicist Stephen Hawking Dies at 76
Brad Tucker talks about the life of Stephen Hawking, the man who the New York Times said "roamed the cosmos from a wheelchair, making discoveries that changed how we see the universe".

Trump Fires Secretary of State
Jason Zengerle, who has investigated the Donald Trump's relationship with Rex Tillerson for the New York Times Magazine, speaks to 7.30 about the secretary of state's departure from the White House

Insurance Insider Calls Out Industry on Mental Illness Policy
Every year, thousands of mentally ill Australians are forced through gruelling claims procedures in order to receive payouts from their insurance companies. Now one former insurance company executive says it's not good enough.

Report Finds Against Former Melbourne Lord Mayor
After a damming report made four adverse findings against former Melbourne Lord Mayor, Robert Doyle, one of the woman who made allegations of sexual harassment against him says she feels vindicated.

Major parties clash over discrimination bill
The second last day of federal parliament for the year and the level of frenzy rose considerably. Asylum seekers, energy and the economy were all being debated, but it was the issue of discrimination against gay students attending religious schools, that had the government and opposition in fiercest combat.

Ita Buttrose gives advice to her younger self
When Ita Buttrose started Cleo magazine in 1972, it was the first time a women's publication was frank about sexuality and it went on to become a huge success. That was just the beginning for a woman who's paved the way for women in journalism ever since. Now Ita Buttrose shares her wisdom in our 'advice to my younger self' series.

Chris Dawson 
Renee Simms, the niece of Lynette Dawson, talks about the arrest of Chris Murphy, who is expected to be charged with the murder of his wife 36 years ago.
 
Reverse mortgages leaving the elderly high and dry
Reverse mortgages are touted as a way to unlock equity in the family home by borrowing against the asset without needing to make repayments until the house is sold or the owner moves out or dies. But a number of banks, including Australia's biggest lender the Commonwealth Bank, are now getting out of the reverse mortgage market, in the face of criticism from the peak financial regulator, ASIC.
Closing Europe's biggest steel works
In the south of Italy, a major corruption trial is underway that is pitting a local community against Europe's biggest steelworks, the Ilva plant in Taranto. The pollution from the plant is so bad it has been blamed in official government reports for the deaths of almost 400 local residents. The former owners of the company have been accused of crimes against public safety.

7.30: December 5, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
30:36
Major parties clash over discrimination bill The second last day of federal parliament for the year and the level of frenzy rose considerably. Asylum seekers, energy and the economy were all being debated, but it was the issue of discrimination against gay students attending religious schools, that had the government and opposition in fiercest combat. Ita Buttrose gives advice to her younger self When Ita Buttrose started Cleo magazine in 1972, it was the first time a women's publication was frank about sexuality and it went on to become a huge success. That was just the beginning for a woman who's paved the way for women in journalism ever since. Now Ita Buttrose shares her wisdom in our 'advice to my younger self' series. Chris Dawson Renee Simms, the niece of Lynette Dawson, talks about the arrest of Chris Murphy, who is expected to be charged with the murder of his wife 36 years ago. Reverse mortgages leaving the elderly high and dry Reverse mortgages are touted as a way to unlock equity in the family home by borrowing against the asset without needing to make repayments until the house is sold or the owner moves out or dies. But a number of banks, including Australia's biggest lender the Commonwealth Bank, are now getting out of the reverse mortgage market, in the face of criticism from the peak financial regulator, ASIC. Closing Europe's biggest steel works In the south of Italy, a major corruption trial is underway that is pitting a local community against Europe's biggest steelworks, the Ilva plant in Taranto. The pollution from the plant is so bad it has been blamed in official government reports for the deaths of almost 400 local residents. The former owners of the company have been accused of crimes against public safety.
Malcolm Turnbull 
There is only one week left of parliament but it is going to be a long week for the Prime Minister. The Liberal party's bitter in-fighting is continuing with the former Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull weighing in to a controversial pre-selection.
ABC journalist 
There's been a lot of focus on women in politics lately and, adding to some of the controversy, today ABC journalist Patricia Karvelas was ejected from Parliament's press gallery. Her crime? Wearing a top which showed too much of her arms.

Gangland investigations
The Victorian Premier has announced a Royal Commission into the way police have handled several high profile gangland investigations, after suppression orders were lifted on a case which showed Victoria Police had recruited a criminal lawyer to report on her own clients. Crime reporter and author, Andrew Rule, says some of the state's most notorious criminals including drug lord Tony Mokbel could now appeal against their convictions.

What is it like being a parent with a disability?
When ABC producer Eliza Hull became pregnant with her daughter, she took a crash course in parenting. As a person with disability, she found the available information often patronising and inaccurate. So she set out to share the genuine experiences of parents with disabilities.

7.30 takes a look at Stuart Robert's business dealings
One of the newer members of Scott Morrison's new ministry is Stuart Robert, the assistant treasurer. He serves in one of the most important roles in government, overseeing the corporate watchdog ASIC. It's a big comeback after his resignation from Malcolm Turnbull's ministry in 2016 but he's found himself at the centre of some unwanted attention in recent months over some of his business dealings.

Former US President George HW Bush dies
This week the body of former president George Bush will lie in state in the U.S. capitol building ahead of a state funeral on Thursday.

7.30: December 3, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
29:21
Malcolm Turnbull There is only one week left of parliament but it is going to be a long week for the Prime Minister. The Liberal party's bitter in-fighting is continuing with the former Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull weighing in to a controversial pre-selection. ABC journalist There's been a lot of focus on women in politics lately and, adding to some of the controversy, today ABC journalist Patricia Karvelas was ejected from Parliament's press gallery. Her crime? Wearing a top which showed too much of her arms. Gangland investigations The Victorian Premier has announced a Royal Commission into the way police have handled several high profile gangland investigations, after suppression orders were lifted on a case which showed Victoria Police had recruited a criminal lawyer to report on her own clients. Crime reporter and author, Andrew Rule, says some of the state's most notorious criminals including drug lord Tony Mokbel could now appeal against their convictions. What is it like being a parent with a disability? When ABC producer Eliza Hull became pregnant with her daughter, she took a crash course in parenting. As a person with disability, she found the available information often patronising and inaccurate. So she set out to share the genuine experiences of parents with disabilities. 7.30 takes a look at Stuart Robert's business dealings One of the newer members of Scott Morrison's new ministry is Stuart Robert, the assistant treasurer. He serves in one of the most important roles in government, overseeing the corporate watchdog ASIC. It's a big comeback after his resignation from Malcolm Turnbull's ministry in 2016 but he's found himself at the centre of some unwanted attention in recent months over some of his business dealings. Former US President George HW Bush dies This week the body of former president George Bush will lie in state in the U.S. capitol building ahead of a state funeral on Thursday.
Catastrophic Queensland bushfires
It's been a catastrophic start to the bushfire season in Queensland with record temperatures and unprecedented fires. Authorities are warning there are least 5 more days of extreme weather ahead and there are still more than 100 fires still burning, mainly in central Queensland, forcing more communities to evacuate
Brexit looms
British politics is swirling over whether the Prime Minister's Brexit deal will be rejected by the parliament and whether the country will be forced to hold a second referendum. But while the politicians battle it out, the looming deadline is having an unexpected impact on one particular group - families that fled Nazi Germany.
Kerryn Phelps
The new independent member for Wentworth, Dr Kerryn Phelps has wasted no time in making her presence felt in Canberra, introducing a private member's bill to remove children from detention in Nauru.
My Health Record
The government has extended the 'my health record' opt out deadline to the end of January. And it's been busy making some changes to the system to address peoples' concerns about privacy.
Minority government
It's been a wild first week of minority government in Canberra, ending with the government narrowly surviving a test of its numbers in the House of Representatives. Chief political correspondent Laura Tingle takes a look.
Satirist Mark Humphries
The Prime Minister has denounced a strike for action on climate change organised by school children. Now 7.30 has obtained a video message from the Coalition to the students, courtesy of satirist Mark Humphries.

7.30: November 29, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
31:31
Catastrophic Queensland bushfires It's been a catastrophic start to the bushfire season in Queensland with record temperatures and unprecedented fires. Authorities are warning there are least 5 more days of extreme weather ahead and there are still more than 100 fires still burning, mainly in central Queensland, forcing more communities to evacuate Brexit looms British politics is swirling over whether the Prime Minister's Brexit deal will be rejected by the parliament and whether the country will be forced to hold a second referendum. But while the politicians battle it out, the looming deadline is having an unexpected impact on one particular group - families that fled Nazi Germany. Kerryn Phelps The new independent member for Wentworth, Dr Kerryn Phelps has wasted no time in making her presence felt in Canberra, introducing a private member's bill to remove children from detention in Nauru. My Health Record The government has extended the 'my health record' opt out deadline to the end of January. And it's been busy making some changes to the system to address peoples' concerns about privacy. Minority government It's been a wild first week of minority government in Canberra, ending with the government narrowly surviving a test of its numbers in the House of Representatives. Chief political correspondent Laura Tingle takes a look. Satirist Mark Humphries The Prime Minister has denounced a strike for action on climate change organised by school children. Now 7.30 has obtained a video message from the Coalition to the students, courtesy of satirist Mark Humphries.
Catastrophic Queensland Bushfires
More than 130 bushfires are burning across Queensland and 8,000 residents of Gracemere have been advised to evacuate their homes. Local MP Brittany Lauga describes the situation around Rockhampton.

Cullen Group 
The building industry is coming under increasing scrutiny with investigations into two recent company collapses. In one instance the Queensland building regulator brushed aside warning signs that one of those companies was in deep financial trouble nine months before it went into liquidation. And there are increasing calls on the federal corporate regulator, ASIC, to intervene and stamp out illegal practices.

 Julia Banks 
The government has spent the day cleaning up after yesterday's shock resignation of Julia Banks from the Liberal Party and her move to the crossbenches. And it defended its decision to have just 10 sitting days before next year's budget.

Australia facing battle over quality and quantity of teachers
When you send your kids to school, you want them to be educated by the best and brightest teachers but attracting and keeping those people is a major challenge. Australia has looming teacher shortage combined with a booming student population. So, what's the solution?

Missy Higgins 
Over the course of her career, singer-songwriter Missy Higgins has had many hits and won a swag of awards. But it hasn't always been that way, and here she offers her younger self some advice.

7.30: November 28, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
30:55
Catastrophic Queensland Bushfires More than 130 bushfires are burning across Queensland and 8,000 residents of Gracemere have been advised to evacuate their homes. Local MP Brittany Lauga describes the situation around Rockhampton. Cullen Group The building industry is coming under increasing scrutiny with investigations into two recent company collapses. In one instance the Queensland building regulator brushed aside warning signs that one of those companies was in deep financial trouble nine months before it went into liquidation. And there are increasing calls on the federal corporate regulator, ASIC, to intervene and stamp out illegal practices. Julia Banks The government has spent the day cleaning up after yesterday's shock resignation of Julia Banks from the Liberal Party and her move to the crossbenches. And it defended its decision to have just 10 sitting days before next year's budget. Australia facing battle over quality and quantity of teachers When you send your kids to school, you want them to be educated by the best and brightest teachers but attracting and keeping those people is a major challenge. Australia has looming teacher shortage combined with a booming student population. So, what's the solution? Missy Higgins Over the course of her career, singer-songwriter Missy Higgins has had many hits and won a swag of awards. But it hasn't always been that way, and here she offers her younger self some advice.
Victorian election
The Andrews Labor government is fighting hold onto power in Victoria in this weekend's state election. The ABC's election analyst, Antony Green, takes a look at how things may unfold.

Silicosis outbreak
Over the past three months, 7.30 has revealed a health crisis among workers cutting artificial stone kitchen benchtops. Dozens of cases of the potentially deadly lung disease silicosis were first identified in Queensland, before even more cases emerged in New South Wales, the ACT and Victoria. It has now become so bad an international health expert has called for urgent medical testing of the entire workforce.

How much do political parties know about you?
Political parties know more about you than you may realise. Parties are looking for whatever edge they can get, and increasingly, that edge comes in the form of personal data. While the use of this data is still in its infancy in this country, its potential is huge.

Jarrod Lyle's legacy
In August Australian golfer Jarrod Lyle lost his third battle against a cancer he was first diagnosed with two decades earlier. His death shocked both the other professionals and his many fans. His widow Briony is continuing her husband's work raising money for families living with cancer through the charity, Challenge.

Labor's new energy policy
For more than a decade, energy policy has been a headache for both sides of politics. Shadow Minister for Climate Change and Energy Mark Butler discusses Labor's newly unveiled the energy policy, which they will take to the next election.

7.30: November 22, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
30:47
Victorian election The Andrews Labor government is fighting hold onto power in Victoria in this weekend's state election. The ABC's election analyst, Antony Green, takes a look at how things may unfold. Silicosis outbreak Over the past three months, 7.30 has revealed a health crisis among workers cutting artificial stone kitchen benchtops. Dozens of cases of the potentially deadly lung disease silicosis were first identified in Queensland, before even more cases emerged in New South Wales, the ACT and Victoria. It has now become so bad an international health expert has called for urgent medical testing of the entire workforce. How much do political parties know about you? Political parties know more about you than you may realise. Parties are looking for whatever edge they can get, and increasingly, that edge comes in the form of personal data. While the use of this data is still in its infancy in this country, its potential is huge. Jarrod Lyle's legacy In August Australian golfer Jarrod Lyle lost his third battle against a cancer he was first diagnosed with two decades earlier. His death shocked both the other professionals and his many fans. His widow Briony is continuing her husband's work raising money for families living with cancer through the charity, Challenge. Labor's new energy policy For more than a decade, energy policy has been a headache for both sides of politics. Shadow Minister for Climate Change and Energy Mark Butler discusses Labor's newly unveiled the energy policy, which they will take to the next election.
Illegal Logging
Government-owned logging company, VicForest has been accused of illegally logging in endangered ecosystems. That logging is contributing to the decline of some of the country's threatened species and destroying some of the last untouched forests in Victoria.

The fall of small mechanics
The car you probably driving today is in effect a highly sophisticated computer and that means fixing cars requires technical information and computer codes. Australia's consumer watchdog, the ACCC, has found that car makers are often reluctant to share that information, pushing up the price of repairs and servicing.

New activist group to challenge Get Up!
A new activist group wants to influence your vote at the next election and is throwing a lot of money at it. Advance Australia has been started by a group of conservative business leaders on a mission to challenge the powerful left-wing lobby group, Get Up!rs and servicing.

Cate McGregor's advice to her younger self
As part of our series of Australians offering advice to their younger selves, Cate McGregor looks back on her eclectic career in the military, politics and cricket. She is also now one of Australia's highest-profile transgender advocates.

Celebrating 50 years of life with muscular dystrophy
Turning 50 is a big deal for anyone, but it's especially significant for Andrew Taylor. At seven he was diagnosed with a form of muscular dystrophy, and doctors didn't expect him to live much beyond his teens.

7.30: November 21, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
29:35
Illegal Logging Government-owned logging company, VicForest has been accused of illegally logging in endangered ecosystems. That logging is contributing to the decline of some of the country's threatened species and destroying some of the last untouched forests in Victoria. The fall of small mechanics The car you probably driving today is in effect a highly sophisticated computer and that means fixing cars requires technical information and computer codes. Australia's consumer watchdog, the ACCC, has found that car makers are often reluctant to share that information, pushing up the price of repairs and servicing. New activist group to challenge Get Up! A new activist group wants to influence your vote at the next election and is throwing a lot of money at it. Advance Australia has been started by a group of conservative business leaders on a mission to challenge the powerful left-wing lobby group, Get Up!rs and servicing. Cate McGregor's advice to her younger self As part of our series of Australians offering advice to their younger selves, Cate McGregor looks back on her eclectic career in the military, politics and cricket. She is also now one of Australia's highest-profile transgender advocates. Celebrating 50 years of life with muscular dystrophy Turning 50 is a big deal for anyone, but it's especially significant for Andrew Taylor. At seven he was diagnosed with a form of muscular dystrophy, and doctors didn't expect him to live much beyond his teens.
Inside Lion Air's crash investigation
Indonesian air safety investigators have recovered one of the flight recorders from the Lion Air plane crash, moving a step closer to finding out what went wrong.
At the same time, Lion Air is conducting its own investigation . 7.30 was granted access to the airline's training facility – as the accident-prone airline attempts to recreate what went wrong during Monday's fateful flight.
Gideon Haigh explains why David Peever had to resign as Chairman of Cricket Australia
Cricket commentator and author, Gideon Haigh, discusses the resignation of David Peever as Chairman of Cricket Australia. It follows a week of pressure over the fallout from the ball tampering scandal.

Controversial gas project divides dying outback town
When South Australia's only coal fired power station closed in 2015 hundreds of jobs were lost and the small community where the coal came from was crippled.
Now a new gas project is offering the outback town of Leigh Creek a lifeline. The problem is the technology promising a new future has a problematic past in Queensland, where it's been banned.

Satirist Mark Humphries takes us behind the scenes to show us how to make a Prime Ministerial video.

Back out of the closet and onto the dance floor
Hundreds of members of the LGBTI community have gathered in central Melbourne for the second 'Coming Back Out Ball', which celebrates those who led the charge out of the closet. But behind the glitz and glamour, the event also addresses issues of social isolation, ageism and homophobia. (Picture supplied: Bryony Jackson/All the Queens Men)

7.30: November 1, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
28:55
Inside Lion Air's crash investigation Indonesian air safety investigators have recovered one of the flight recorders from the Lion Air plane crash, moving a step closer to finding out what went wrong. At the same time, Lion Air is conducting its own investigation . 7.30 was granted access to the airline's training facility – as the accident-prone airline attempts to recreate what went wrong during Monday's fateful flight. Gideon Haigh explains why David Peever had to resign as Chairman of Cricket Australia Cricket commentator and author, Gideon Haigh, discusses the resignation of David Peever as Chairman of Cricket Australia. It follows a week of pressure over the fallout from the ball tampering scandal. Controversial gas project divides dying outback town When South Australia's only coal fired power station closed in 2015 hundreds of jobs were lost and the small community where the coal came from was crippled. Now a new gas project is offering the outback town of Leigh Creek a lifeline. The problem is the technology promising a new future has a problematic past in Queensland, where it's been banned. Satirist Mark Humphries takes us behind the scenes to show us how to make a Prime Ministerial video. Back out of the closet and onto the dance floor Hundreds of members of the LGBTI community have gathered in central Melbourne for the second 'Coming Back Out Ball', which celebrates those who led the charge out of the closet. But behind the glitz and glamour, the event also addresses issues of social isolation, ageism and homophobia. (Picture supplied: Bryony Jackson/All the Queens Men)
Meet the Kansas governor candidate described as 'Trump before Trump'
With US mid-term elections on next week, Republicans are desperately trying to hold onto their majority as Democrats gain ground in traditionally conservative states. As well as voting for Congress, they're deciding the Governorships of their states. And this year all eyes are on the race in Kansas, where Kris Kobach, a man described as a 'mini Trump' is running on an anti-immigrant agenda.
Former High Court Judge Michael Kirby shares his wisdom for Year 12 students
This week 7.30 has heard from some wonderful Australians offering advice for year 12 students sitting end of school exams. In the final instalment, former High Court Judge Michael Kirby shares his wisdom.
Grieving dad fulfils triathlon promise to wife and son who died of brain cancer
Leigh Chivers lost both his wife, Sara, and son, Alfie, to brain cancer within six months of each other. Now he's fulfilled a promise he made to his wife and also a life long dream, by completing the gruelling Hawaiian Ironman.
The real cost of becoming a cashless Australia
Carrying cash is fast becoming a thing of the past. While digital payments are more convenient for many of us, it's making life difficult for buskers, the homeless and charities who collect on the streets. The Salvation Army has adopted paypass, and The Big Issue magazine is about to switch to tap-n-go in a bid to stay afloat.
The incredible reality for young carers
One in eight people in Australia are carers for family members who are sick, disabled, frail or have an addiction. And it's not just adults, more than 275,000 Australian children are caring for parents or siblings. They're juggling burdens that would be challenging for adults to manage and, as a consequence, they face a serious risk of long-term disadvantage.

7.30: October 31, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
30:41
Meet the Kansas governor candidate described as 'Trump before Trump' With US mid-term elections on next week, Republicans are desperately trying to hold onto their majority as Democrats gain ground in traditionally conservative states. As well as voting for Congress, they're deciding the Governorships of their states. And this year all eyes are on the race in Kansas, where Kris Kobach, a man described as a 'mini Trump' is running on an anti-immigrant agenda. Former High Court Judge Michael Kirby shares his wisdom for Year 12 students This week 7.30 has heard from some wonderful Australians offering advice for year 12 students sitting end of school exams. In the final instalment, former High Court Judge Michael Kirby shares his wisdom. Grieving dad fulfils triathlon promise to wife and son who died of brain cancer Leigh Chivers lost both his wife, Sara, and son, Alfie, to brain cancer within six months of each other. Now he's fulfilled a promise he made to his wife and also a life long dream, by completing the gruelling Hawaiian Ironman. The real cost of becoming a cashless Australia Carrying cash is fast becoming a thing of the past. While digital payments are more convenient for many of us, it's making life difficult for buskers, the homeless and charities who collect on the streets. The Salvation Army has adopted paypass, and The Big Issue magazine is about to switch to tap-n-go in a bid to stay afloat. The incredible reality for young carers One in eight people in Australia are carers for family members who are sick, disabled, frail or have an addiction. And it's not just adults, more than 275,000 Australian children are caring for parents or siblings. They're juggling burdens that would be challenging for adults to manage and, as a consequence, they face a serious risk of long-term disadvantage.
Major parties clash over discrimination bill
The second last day of federal parliament for the year and the level of frenzy rose considerably. Asylum seekers, energy and the economy were all being debated, but it was the issue of discrimination against gay students attending religious schools, that had the government and opposition in fiercest combat.

Ita Buttrose gives advice to her younger self
When Ita Buttrose started Cleo magazine in 1972, it was the first time a women's publication was frank about sexuality and it went on to become a huge success. That was just the beginning for a woman who's paved the way for women in journalism ever since. Now Ita Buttrose shares her wisdom in our 'advice to my younger self' series.

Chris Dawson 
Renee Simms, the niece of Lynette Dawson, talks about the arrest of Chris Murphy, who is expected to be charged with the murder of his wife 36 years ago.
 
Reverse mortgages leaving the elderly high and dry
Reverse mortgages are touted as a way to unlock equity in the family home by borrowing against the asset without needing to make repayments until the house is sold or the owner moves out or dies. But a number of banks, including Australia's biggest lender the Commonwealth Bank, are now getting out of the reverse mortgage market, in the face of criticism from the peak financial regulator, ASIC.
Closing Europe's biggest steel works
In the south of Italy, a major corruption trial is underway that is pitting a local community against Europe's biggest steelworks, the Ilva plant in Taranto. The pollution from the plant is so bad it has been blamed in official government reports for the deaths of almost 400 local residents. The former owners of the company have been accused of crimes against public safety.

7.30: December 5, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
30:36
Major parties clash over discrimination bill The second last day of federal parliament for the year and the level of frenzy rose considerably. Asylum seekers, energy and the economy were all being debated, but it was the issue of discrimination against gay students attending religious schools, that had the government and opposition in fiercest combat. Ita Buttrose gives advice to her younger self When Ita Buttrose started Cleo magazine in 1972, it was the first time a women's publication was frank about sexuality and it went on to become a huge success. That was just the beginning for a woman who's paved the way for women in journalism ever since. Now Ita Buttrose shares her wisdom in our 'advice to my younger self' series. Chris Dawson Renee Simms, the niece of Lynette Dawson, talks about the arrest of Chris Murphy, who is expected to be charged with the murder of his wife 36 years ago. Reverse mortgages leaving the elderly high and dry Reverse mortgages are touted as a way to unlock equity in the family home by borrowing against the asset without needing to make repayments until the house is sold or the owner moves out or dies. But a number of banks, including Australia's biggest lender the Commonwealth Bank, are now getting out of the reverse mortgage market, in the face of criticism from the peak financial regulator, ASIC. Closing Europe's biggest steel works In the south of Italy, a major corruption trial is underway that is pitting a local community against Europe's biggest steelworks, the Ilva plant in Taranto. The pollution from the plant is so bad it has been blamed in official government reports for the deaths of almost 400 local residents. The former owners of the company have been accused of crimes against public safety.
Malcolm Turnbull 
There is only one week left of parliament but it is going to be a long week for the Prime Minister. The Liberal party's bitter in-fighting is continuing with the former Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull weighing in to a controversial pre-selection.
ABC journalist 
There's been a lot of focus on women in politics lately and, adding to some of the controversy, today ABC journalist Patricia Karvelas was ejected from Parliament's press gallery. Her crime? Wearing a top which showed too much of her arms.

Gangland investigations
The Victorian Premier has announced a Royal Commission into the way police have handled several high profile gangland investigations, after suppression orders were lifted on a case which showed Victoria Police had recruited a criminal lawyer to report on her own clients. Crime reporter and author, Andrew Rule, says some of the state's most notorious criminals including drug lord Tony Mokbel could now appeal against their convictions.

What is it like being a parent with a disability?
When ABC producer Eliza Hull became pregnant with her daughter, she took a crash course in parenting. As a person with disability, she found the available information often patronising and inaccurate. So she set out to share the genuine experiences of parents with disabilities.

7.30 takes a look at Stuart Robert's business dealings
One of the newer members of Scott Morrison's new ministry is Stuart Robert, the assistant treasurer. He serves in one of the most important roles in government, overseeing the corporate watchdog ASIC. It's a big comeback after his resignation from Malcolm Turnbull's ministry in 2016 but he's found himself at the centre of some unwanted attention in recent months over some of his business dealings.

Former US President George HW Bush dies
This week the body of former president George Bush will lie in state in the U.S. capitol building ahead of a state funeral on Thursday.

7.30: December 3, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
29:21
Malcolm Turnbull There is only one week left of parliament but it is going to be a long week for the Prime Minister. The Liberal party's bitter in-fighting is continuing with the former Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull weighing in to a controversial pre-selection. ABC journalist There's been a lot of focus on women in politics lately and, adding to some of the controversy, today ABC journalist Patricia Karvelas was ejected from Parliament's press gallery. Her crime? Wearing a top which showed too much of her arms. Gangland investigations The Victorian Premier has announced a Royal Commission into the way police have handled several high profile gangland investigations, after suppression orders were lifted on a case which showed Victoria Police had recruited a criminal lawyer to report on her own clients. Crime reporter and author, Andrew Rule, says some of the state's most notorious criminals including drug lord Tony Mokbel could now appeal against their convictions. What is it like being a parent with a disability? When ABC producer Eliza Hull became pregnant with her daughter, she took a crash course in parenting. As a person with disability, she found the available information often patronising and inaccurate. So she set out to share the genuine experiences of parents with disabilities. 7.30 takes a look at Stuart Robert's business dealings One of the newer members of Scott Morrison's new ministry is Stuart Robert, the assistant treasurer. He serves in one of the most important roles in government, overseeing the corporate watchdog ASIC. It's a big comeback after his resignation from Malcolm Turnbull's ministry in 2016 but he's found himself at the centre of some unwanted attention in recent months over some of his business dealings. Former US President George HW Bush dies This week the body of former president George Bush will lie in state in the U.S. capitol building ahead of a state funeral on Thursday.
Catastrophic Queensland bushfires
It's been a catastrophic start to the bushfire season in Queensland with record temperatures and unprecedented fires. Authorities are warning there are least 5 more days of extreme weather ahead and there are still more than 100 fires still burning, mainly in central Queensland, forcing more communities to evacuate
Brexit looms
British politics is swirling over whether the Prime Minister's Brexit deal will be rejected by the parliament and whether the country will be forced to hold a second referendum. But while the politicians battle it out, the looming deadline is having an unexpected impact on one particular group - families that fled Nazi Germany.
Kerryn Phelps
The new independent member for Wentworth, Dr Kerryn Phelps has wasted no time in making her presence felt in Canberra, introducing a private member's bill to remove children from detention in Nauru.
My Health Record
The government has extended the 'my health record' opt out deadline to the end of January. And it's been busy making some changes to the system to address peoples' concerns about privacy.
Minority government
It's been a wild first week of minority government in Canberra, ending with the government narrowly surviving a test of its numbers in the House of Representatives. Chief political correspondent Laura Tingle takes a look.
Satirist Mark Humphries
The Prime Minister has denounced a strike for action on climate change organised by school children. Now 7.30 has obtained a video message from the Coalition to the students, courtesy of satirist Mark Humphries.

7.30: November 29, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
31:31
Catastrophic Queensland bushfires It's been a catastrophic start to the bushfire season in Queensland with record temperatures and unprecedented fires. Authorities are warning there are least 5 more days of extreme weather ahead and there are still more than 100 fires still burning, mainly in central Queensland, forcing more communities to evacuate Brexit looms British politics is swirling over whether the Prime Minister's Brexit deal will be rejected by the parliament and whether the country will be forced to hold a second referendum. But while the politicians battle it out, the looming deadline is having an unexpected impact on one particular group - families that fled Nazi Germany. Kerryn Phelps The new independent member for Wentworth, Dr Kerryn Phelps has wasted no time in making her presence felt in Canberra, introducing a private member's bill to remove children from detention in Nauru. My Health Record The government has extended the 'my health record' opt out deadline to the end of January. And it's been busy making some changes to the system to address peoples' concerns about privacy. Minority government It's been a wild first week of minority government in Canberra, ending with the government narrowly surviving a test of its numbers in the House of Representatives. Chief political correspondent Laura Tingle takes a look. Satirist Mark Humphries The Prime Minister has denounced a strike for action on climate change organised by school children. Now 7.30 has obtained a video message from the Coalition to the students, courtesy of satirist Mark Humphries.
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