7.30

7.30

January 30, 2018
ABC  |  January 30, 2018
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This video has closed captioning

Ben Simmons Takes NBA By Storm
Right now there's a record number of Australian basketball players in the US on NBA courts, and one of the most talented is Ben Simmons. 7.30 caught up with him in Philadelphia.

Attempt to Train 70 Wild Brumbies in Seven Days
On a remote cattle station, horse trainer Joe Hughes wanted to train 70 wild brumbies in seven days. Not only did he end up helping the horses, he helped a group of former military personnel return to civilian life.

CBA Names New CEO As Another Scandal Breaks
The Commonwealth Bank's reputation has taken a big hit over financial advice scandals and a massive money laundering case. And today there was news ASIC has started legal action over alleged market manipulation. This week the bank appointed Matt Comyn as CEO, who now has a huge responsibility on his shoulders.

David Kilcullen on War in Afghanistan
Military strategist and counter-insurgency expert David Kilcullen joins 7.30 to discuss the latest developments in Afghanistan.

Ben Simmons Takes NBA By Storm
Right now there's a record number of Australian basketball players in the US on NBA courts, and one of the most talented is Ben Simmons. 7.30 caught up with him in Philadelphia.

Attempt to Train 70 Wild Brumbies in Seven Days
On a remote cattle station, horse trainer Joe Hughes wanted to train 70 wild brumbies in seven days. Not only did he end up helping the horses, he helped a group of former military personnel return to civilian life.

CBA Names New CEO As Another Scandal Breaks
The Commonwealth Bank's reputation has taken a big hit over financial advice scandals and a massive money laundering case. And today there was news ASIC has started legal action over alleged market manipulation. This week the bank appointed Matt Comyn as CEO, who now has a huge responsibility on his shoulders.

David Kilcullen on War in Afghanistan
Military strategist and counter-insurgency expert David Kilcullen joins 7.30 to discuss the latest developments in Afghanistan.

Malcolm Turnbull 
Laura Tingle discusses the latest from Canberra, including electricity prices and the possibility of the government funding a new coal-fired power station.
Croatia 
Millions of fans will watch the World Cup decider this weekend - a David and Goliath contest between a football powerhouse and a tiny country that's never made the final before. After beating England, Croatia will take on the tournament favourites France in the final.
Mortgage Choice 
One of Australia's biggest publicly listed brokers, Mortgage Choice, has an overhaul of its remuneration model. It says it will now pay franchisees more and reduce the volatility of their income. It comes after complaints from franchisees, who said Mortgage Choice's business model was leaving some brokers in financial ruin.
Trump set to meet NATO leaders as part of European visit
US President starts the beginning of what promises to be stormy week-long visit to Europe with a NATO meeting in Belgium. Rachael Rizzo of the Centre for a New American Security discusses what may happen.
Miss America beauty pageant 
For the first time in nearly 100 years, when young women vying for the title of Miss America appear on stage in Atlantic City this September it won't be in swimsuits. In the #MeToo era, the historic pageant is promising Miss America 2.0 will focus on contestants talents, intelligence and ideas - not their outward appearance. But not everyone is happy to say bye-bye to the bikinis.

7.30: Malcolm Turnbull/Croatia/Mortgage Choice/Trump Meets NATO Leaders/Miss America Beauty Pageant

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
30:36
Malcolm Turnbull Laura Tingle discusses the latest from Canberra, including electricity prices and the possibility of the government funding a new coal-fired power station. Croatia Millions of fans will watch the World Cup decider this weekend - a David and Goliath contest between a football powerhouse and a tiny country that's never made the final before. After beating England, Croatia will take on the tournament favourites France in the final. Mortgage Choice One of Australia's biggest publicly listed brokers, Mortgage Choice, has an overhaul of its remuneration model. It says it will now pay franchisees more and reduce the volatility of their income. It comes after complaints from franchisees, who said Mortgage Choice's business model was leaving some brokers in financial ruin. Trump set to meet NATO leaders as part of European visit US President starts the beginning of what promises to be stormy week-long visit to Europe with a NATO meeting in Belgium. Rachael Rizzo of the Centre for a New American Security discusses what may happen. Miss America beauty pageant For the first time in nearly 100 years, when young women vying for the title of Miss America appear on stage in Atlantic City this September it won't be in swimsuits. In the #MeToo era, the historic pageant is promising Miss America 2.0 will focus on contestants talents, intelligence and ideas - not their outward appearance. But not everyone is happy to say bye-bye to the bikinis.
Fortnite Phenomenon 
If you have kids, chances are they're among the 125 million people playing the popular video game Fortnite. And it's driving some parents and teachers crazy. They are flocking to professional help to pry their kids away but for others the game is just like any other hobby - it's all about balance.
Bernard Collaery
Unprecedented legal action against two men for allegedly breaching the intelligence services act has sparked fierce debate about the balance between national security and the public's right to know.
Rod Sims 
Australia's competition watchdog has laid out a sweeping plan to bring those bills down and says it could save households up to $400 a year. Rod Sims outlines what the ACCC has in mind.
Rural Mental Health
A western Victorian farmer has come up with a bald plan to give his industry national exposure. He's convincing an increasing number of his colleagues to take their kit off. It's part of a cheeky new campaign called "The Naked Farmer", which aims to raise awareness of - and funding for - mental health.
Dept. of Veterans' Affairs
Last month 7.30 aired a story about the extraordinary lengths the Department of Veterans' Affairs went to, to thwart a compensation claim: secretly changing its own policy in order to stop a claim by a former elite paratrooper who had badly injured his back. We've now learnt the head of the Veterans' Affairs department has requested a meeting with Mr Rollins in order to issue a personal apology. The ministers for Defence and Veterans Affairs have also ordered a departmental review into the matter.

7.30: Fortnite Phenomenon/ Bernard Collaery/Rod Sims/Rural Mental Health/Dept. of Veteran Affairs

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
31:31
Fortnite Phenomenon If you have kids, chances are they're among the 125 million people playing the popular video game Fortnite. And it's driving some parents and teachers crazy. They are flocking to professional help to pry their kids away but for others the game is just like any other hobby - it's all about balance. Bernard Collaery Unprecedented legal action against two men for allegedly breaching the intelligence services act has sparked fierce debate about the balance between national security and the public's right to know. Rod Sims Australia's competition watchdog has laid out a sweeping plan to bring those bills down and says it could save households up to $400 a year. Rod Sims outlines what the ACCC has in mind. Rural Mental Health A western Victorian farmer has come up with a bald plan to give his industry national exposure. He's convincing an increasing number of his colleagues to take their kit off. It's part of a cheeky new campaign called "The Naked Farmer", which aims to raise awareness of - and funding for - mental health. Dept. of Veterans' Affairs Last month 7.30 aired a story about the extraordinary lengths the Department of Veterans' Affairs went to, to thwart a compensation claim: secretly changing its own policy in order to stop a claim by a former elite paratrooper who had badly injured his back. We've now learnt the head of the Veterans' Affairs department has requested a meeting with Mr Rollins in order to issue a personal apology. The ministers for Defence and Veterans Affairs have also ordered a departmental review into the matter.
Secret Suburban
Crime syndicates are growing tonnes of cannabis in suburban houses across Australia. Police don't know quite how big the problem is, but know that these cannabis grow houses produce more of the drug than any other method, and that the majority of these houses are owned by Vietnamese organised crime networks.
Sarah Hanson-Young 
Sarah Hanson Young says comments made about her by David Leyonhjelm in a senate debate have brought the entire parliament into disrepute.
David Leyonhjelm
During a Senate debate, Senator David Leyonhjelm called out across the chamber to Senator Sarah Hanson-Young for her to "stop shagging men". That was during a debate about "protecting women", in the form of pepper spray and tasers. The comments have been widely condemned, but Senator Leyonhjelm says he was justified.
Labor's corporate tax policy
For months, Labor's commanded an election-winning lead in the polls but a messy few days last week has put the opposition on the back foot. Opposition Leader Bill Shorten improvised on Labor's company tax policy, forcing a retreat 72 hours later. Opposition Finance spokesman, Jim Chalmers explains Labor's position.
Judith Durham
Folk group The Seekers had six top 10 hits during 1965 and 1966 – making singer Judith Durham a household name. She went on to pursue a successful solo career and has recorded more than a dozen albums over fifty years. It's Judith Durham's birthday tomorrow and to celebrate, she's releasing a new record.

7.30: Secret Suburban/Sarah Hanson-Young/David Leyonhjelm/Labor's Corporate Tax Policy/Judith Durham

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
31:09
Secret Suburban Crime syndicates are growing tonnes of cannabis in suburban houses across Australia. Police don't know quite how big the problem is, but know that these cannabis grow houses produce more of the drug than any other method, and that the majority of these houses are owned by Vietnamese organised crime networks. Sarah Hanson-Young Sarah Hanson Young says comments made about her by David Leyonhjelm in a senate debate have brought the entire parliament into disrepute. David Leyonhjelm During a Senate debate, Senator David Leyonhjelm called out across the chamber to Senator Sarah Hanson-Young for her to "stop shagging men". That was during a debate about "protecting women", in the form of pepper spray and tasers. The comments have been widely condemned, but Senator Leyonhjelm says he was justified. Labor's corporate tax policy For months, Labor's commanded an election-winning lead in the polls but a messy few days last week has put the opposition on the back foot. Opposition Leader Bill Shorten improvised on Labor's company tax policy, forcing a retreat 72 hours later. Opposition Finance spokesman, Jim Chalmers explains Labor's position. Judith Durham Folk group The Seekers had six top 10 hits during 1965 and 1966 – making singer Judith Durham a household name. She went on to pursue a successful solo career and has recorded more than a dozen albums over fifty years. It's Judith Durham's birthday tomorrow and to celebrate, she's releasing a new record.
Extended interview with Josh Frydenberg 
7.30's political correspondent Laura Tingle interviews Energy Minister Josh Frydenberg about the National Energy Guarantee.
Bill Shorten's pledge to reverse company tax cuts
The Opposition Leader Bill Shorten is under pressure over his Captain's Call yesterday, when he announced that if Labor is elected it will reverse the company tax cut the Turnbull government has introduced for businesses that turn over between $10 million and $50 million.
The hidden head injuries plaguing jockeys
One sport you might not immediately think of when it comes to brain injuries is horse racing. Retired jockey Dale Spriggs knows differently. He estimates he suffered more than 20 concussions during his long career, and had multiple falls. He's pledging his brain to the Australian Sports Brain Bank to help researchers find out more about a degenerative disease caused by repetitive hits to the head.
Hunters risking their lives to stamp out feral pigs
Ask any farmer and they'll tell you that feral pigs need eradication because they carry disease and destroy crops. Unlike efforts to control other types of feral animals, there's a growing subculture of people who enthusiastically do it for free. But does that put pig hunters at risk from the very diseases farmers want gone?
The mother-daughter business partnership making more than just coffee
Only half of Australians with disabilities have jobs, and people with disabilities regularly face extra hurdles when trying to find work. One of those people is Bron Shelverton, she has Down syndrome. So she and her mother set up their own business running a coffee van in the hope it will provide a secure future for Bron.

7.30: Josh Frydenberg/Bill Shorten's Pledge/Head Injuries Plaguing Jockeys/Stamp out Feral Pigs/Mother and Daughter Business Partnership

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
30:17
Extended interview with Josh Frydenberg 7.30's political correspondent Laura Tingle interviews Energy Minister Josh Frydenberg about the National Energy Guarantee. Bill Shorten's pledge to reverse company tax cuts The Opposition Leader Bill Shorten is under pressure over his Captain's Call yesterday, when he announced that if Labor is elected it will reverse the company tax cut the Turnbull government has introduced for businesses that turn over between $10 million and $50 million. The hidden head injuries plaguing jockeys One sport you might not immediately think of when it comes to brain injuries is horse racing. Retired jockey Dale Spriggs knows differently. He estimates he suffered more than 20 concussions during his long career, and had multiple falls. He's pledging his brain to the Australian Sports Brain Bank to help researchers find out more about a degenerative disease caused by repetitive hits to the head. Hunters risking their lives to stamp out feral pigs Ask any farmer and they'll tell you that feral pigs need eradication because they carry disease and destroy crops. Unlike efforts to control other types of feral animals, there's a growing subculture of people who enthusiastically do it for free. But does that put pig hunters at risk from the very diseases farmers want gone? The mother-daughter business partnership making more than just coffee Only half of Australians with disabilities have jobs, and people with disabilities regularly face extra hurdles when trying to find work. One of those people is Bron Shelverton, she has Down syndrome. So she and her mother set up their own business running a coffee van in the hope it will provide a secure future for Bron.
Mark Schwarzer: Australia's World Cup chances
As the Socceroos prepare for could be their make-or-break World Cup game against Denmark in Russia, former goalkeeper, Mark Schwarzer, assess their chances.

Overtime payment ruling leaves farmers worried
Australia's fruit and vegetable farmers fear their businesses will be pushed to breaking point if they are forced to pay workers more for overtime. The Fair Work Commission has announced it will award overtime to casual fruit pickers but is still negotiating the details.

Donald Trump: controversial child separation policy
Donald Trump has signed an executive order to keep migrant families together after sparking outrage by splitting families crossing the US-Mexico border. However the president says that overall, the immigration crackdown will continue.

$140-billion tax cut  
The parliament has agreed to the Turnbull government's $140-billion tax cut plan. It'll dramatically reshape our personal income tax system and, over the long-term, deliver almost every Australian extra money in their pocket.

Insurance companies under the microscope
The conduct of insurers after major weather events will be scrutinised when the financial services royal commission meets in Queensland next week. Losses from last year's tropical cyclone Debbie amounted to $1.7-billion but 7.30 has discovered, getting insurance payouts is often less than easy and some people are yet to return to their damaged homes in North Queensland.

7.30: June 21, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
31:42
Mark Schwarzer: Australia's World Cup chances As the Socceroos prepare for could be their make-or-break World Cup game against Denmark in Russia, former goalkeeper, Mark Schwarzer, assess their chances. Overtime payment ruling leaves farmers worried Australia's fruit and vegetable farmers fear their businesses will be pushed to breaking point if they are forced to pay workers more for overtime. The Fair Work Commission has announced it will award overtime to casual fruit pickers but is still negotiating the details. Donald Trump: controversial child separation policy Donald Trump has signed an executive order to keep migrant families together after sparking outrage by splitting families crossing the US-Mexico border. However the president says that overall, the immigration crackdown will continue. $140-billion tax cut The parliament has agreed to the Turnbull government's $140-billion tax cut plan. It'll dramatically reshape our personal income tax system and, over the long-term, deliver almost every Australian extra money in their pocket. Insurance companies under the microscope The conduct of insurers after major weather events will be scrutinised when the financial services royal commission meets in Queensland next week. Losses from last year's tropical cyclone Debbie amounted to $1.7-billion but 7.30 has discovered, getting insurance payouts is often less than easy and some people are yet to return to their damaged homes in North Queensland.
If you’ve ever wondered about how long (or short) your attention span is, or perhaps even worried that there’s something seriously wrong with your ability to pay attention – you’re not alone. 

Insight guest Leanne became concerned about her attention span when she caught up with an old friend over lunch, but couldn’t stop checking her phone and thinking about what else she could be doing – like scrolling through her Facebook. 

At home, she says she gets distracted by something as trivial as a bad smell, or the noise of someone mowing the lawn. It can take her off task and take up her attention for the entire day.

This week on Insight, Leanne’s attention is tested and the findings surprise her.

And guest host Janice Petersen asks the “5 billion dollar question,” as neuroscientist, Associate Professor Paul Dux puts it – can we train, and even increase our attention spans? And how do you do it?

When the stakes are as high as a plane full of people, or a life on the operating table – how can that affect your ability to hold attention, and what can happen if you don’t? 

“The worst case is that two aircraft collide and a catastrophic failure in the system occurs,” air traffic controller Tom McRobert says.

For neurosurgeon Nazih Asaad, the consequences can also be fatal and with the trust of the patient in his hands, the potential risks of the surgery can weigh on him in the lead up to the operation.

AFL player for the GWS Giants Heath Shaw was diagnosed with ADHD when he was a teenager. He says some of the behaviours have followed him into adulthood and on the field.

Insight asks – what is attention, and how can it impact your life? How do you know if your attention span is normal? And what makes some people better at paying attention than others?

Insight: Attention

News and current affairs, Intercultural understanding

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs, Intercultural understanding
53:43
If you’ve ever wondered about how long (or short) your attention span is, or perhaps even worried that there’s something seriously wrong with your ability to pay attention – you’re not alone. Insight guest Leanne became concerned about her attention span when she caught up with an old friend over lunch, but couldn’t stop checking her phone and thinking about what else she could be doing – like scrolling through her Facebook. At home, she says she gets distracted by something as trivial as a bad smell, or the noise of someone mowing the lawn. It can take her off task and take up her attention for the entire day. This week on Insight, Leanne’s attention is tested and the findings surprise her. And guest host Janice Petersen asks the “5 billion dollar question,” as neuroscientist, Associate Professor Paul Dux puts it – can we train, and even increase our attention spans? And how do you do it? When the stakes are as high as a plane full of people, or a life on the operating table – how can that affect your ability to hold attention, and what can happen if you don’t? “The worst case is that two aircraft collide and a catastrophic failure in the system occurs,” air traffic controller Tom McRobert says. For neurosurgeon Nazih Asaad, the consequences can also be fatal and with the trust of the patient in his hands, the potential risks of the surgery can weigh on him in the lead up to the operation. AFL player for the GWS Giants Heath Shaw was diagnosed with ADHD when he was a teenager. He says some of the behaviours have followed him into adulthood and on the field. Insight asks – what is attention, and how can it impact your life? How do you know if your attention span is normal? And what makes some people better at paying attention than others?
Malcolm Turnbull 
Laura Tingle discusses the latest from Canberra, including electricity prices and the possibility of the government funding a new coal-fired power station.
Croatia 
Millions of fans will watch the World Cup decider this weekend - a David and Goliath contest between a football powerhouse and a tiny country that's never made the final before. After beating England, Croatia will take on the tournament favourites France in the final.
Mortgage Choice 
One of Australia's biggest publicly listed brokers, Mortgage Choice, has an overhaul of its remuneration model. It says it will now pay franchisees more and reduce the volatility of their income. It comes after complaints from franchisees, who said Mortgage Choice's business model was leaving some brokers in financial ruin.
Trump set to meet NATO leaders as part of European visit
US President starts the beginning of what promises to be stormy week-long visit to Europe with a NATO meeting in Belgium. Rachael Rizzo of the Centre for a New American Security discusses what may happen.
Miss America beauty pageant 
For the first time in nearly 100 years, when young women vying for the title of Miss America appear on stage in Atlantic City this September it won't be in swimsuits. In the #MeToo era, the historic pageant is promising Miss America 2.0 will focus on contestants talents, intelligence and ideas - not their outward appearance. But not everyone is happy to say bye-bye to the bikinis.

7.30: Malcolm Turnbull/Croatia/Mortgage Choice/Trump Meets NATO Leaders/Miss America Beauty Pageant

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
30:36
Malcolm Turnbull Laura Tingle discusses the latest from Canberra, including electricity prices and the possibility of the government funding a new coal-fired power station. Croatia Millions of fans will watch the World Cup decider this weekend - a David and Goliath contest between a football powerhouse and a tiny country that's never made the final before. After beating England, Croatia will take on the tournament favourites France in the final. Mortgage Choice One of Australia's biggest publicly listed brokers, Mortgage Choice, has an overhaul of its remuneration model. It says it will now pay franchisees more and reduce the volatility of their income. It comes after complaints from franchisees, who said Mortgage Choice's business model was leaving some brokers in financial ruin. Trump set to meet NATO leaders as part of European visit US President starts the beginning of what promises to be stormy week-long visit to Europe with a NATO meeting in Belgium. Rachael Rizzo of the Centre for a New American Security discusses what may happen. Miss America beauty pageant For the first time in nearly 100 years, when young women vying for the title of Miss America appear on stage in Atlantic City this September it won't be in swimsuits. In the #MeToo era, the historic pageant is promising Miss America 2.0 will focus on contestants talents, intelligence and ideas - not their outward appearance. But not everyone is happy to say bye-bye to the bikinis.
Fortnite Phenomenon 
If you have kids, chances are they're among the 125 million people playing the popular video game Fortnite. And it's driving some parents and teachers crazy. They are flocking to professional help to pry their kids away but for others the game is just like any other hobby - it's all about balance.
Bernard Collaery
Unprecedented legal action against two men for allegedly breaching the intelligence services act has sparked fierce debate about the balance between national security and the public's right to know.
Rod Sims 
Australia's competition watchdog has laid out a sweeping plan to bring those bills down and says it could save households up to $400 a year. Rod Sims outlines what the ACCC has in mind.
Rural Mental Health
A western Victorian farmer has come up with a bald plan to give his industry national exposure. He's convincing an increasing number of his colleagues to take their kit off. It's part of a cheeky new campaign called "The Naked Farmer", which aims to raise awareness of - and funding for - mental health.
Dept. of Veterans' Affairs
Last month 7.30 aired a story about the extraordinary lengths the Department of Veterans' Affairs went to, to thwart a compensation claim: secretly changing its own policy in order to stop a claim by a former elite paratrooper who had badly injured his back. We've now learnt the head of the Veterans' Affairs department has requested a meeting with Mr Rollins in order to issue a personal apology. The ministers for Defence and Veterans Affairs have also ordered a departmental review into the matter.

7.30: Fortnite Phenomenon/ Bernard Collaery/Rod Sims/Rural Mental Health/Dept. of Veteran Affairs

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
31:31
Fortnite Phenomenon If you have kids, chances are they're among the 125 million people playing the popular video game Fortnite. And it's driving some parents and teachers crazy. They are flocking to professional help to pry their kids away but for others the game is just like any other hobby - it's all about balance. Bernard Collaery Unprecedented legal action against two men for allegedly breaching the intelligence services act has sparked fierce debate about the balance between national security and the public's right to know. Rod Sims Australia's competition watchdog has laid out a sweeping plan to bring those bills down and says it could save households up to $400 a year. Rod Sims outlines what the ACCC has in mind. Rural Mental Health A western Victorian farmer has come up with a bald plan to give his industry national exposure. He's convincing an increasing number of his colleagues to take their kit off. It's part of a cheeky new campaign called "The Naked Farmer", which aims to raise awareness of - and funding for - mental health. Dept. of Veterans' Affairs Last month 7.30 aired a story about the extraordinary lengths the Department of Veterans' Affairs went to, to thwart a compensation claim: secretly changing its own policy in order to stop a claim by a former elite paratrooper who had badly injured his back. We've now learnt the head of the Veterans' Affairs department has requested a meeting with Mr Rollins in order to issue a personal apology. The ministers for Defence and Veterans Affairs have also ordered a departmental review into the matter.
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