7.30

7.30

February 27, 2018
ABC  |  February 27, 2018

Cousins Says Shorten Told Him Labor Could Revoke Adani Licence
Businessman and environmentalist Geoff Cousins says federal opposition leader Bill Shorten told him that when Labor wins government they would revoke the Adani mine licence "if the evidence is as compelling as we presently believe it to be".

Would-be Migrants Abandoned by Migration Agent After Payment
A businessman is under investigation for allegedly charging tens of thousands of dollars in exchange for skilled working visas would-be migrants never received.

D'Alpuget on Lust, Longing and Being 'The Other Woman'
Before the Barnaby Joyce affair there was the enormously controversial affair between Bob Hawke and his biographer, Blanche D'Alpuget. Leigh Sales sat down with D'Alpuget to talk about her latest reflections on the nature of love and sex.

Cousins Says Shorten Told Him Labor Could Revoke Adani Licence
Businessman and environmentalist Geoff Cousins says federal opposition leader Bill Shorten told him that when Labor wins government they would revoke the Adani mine licence "if the evidence is as compelling as we presently believe it to be".

Would-be Migrants Abandoned by Migration Agent After Payment
A businessman is under investigation for allegedly charging tens of thousands of dollars in exchange for skilled working visas would-be migrants never received.

D'Alpuget on Lust, Longing and Being 'The Other Woman'
Before the Barnaby Joyce affair there was the enormously controversial affair between Bob Hawke and his biographer, Blanche D'Alpuget. Leigh Sales sat down with D'Alpuget to talk about her latest reflections on the nature of love and sex.

Family businesses sent to the wall by their own banks
The Banking Royal Commission has today been hearing about the dysfunctional world of lending to small business. Two business owners tell 7.30 their stories about dealing with the banks. One even blames his lender for sending him broke.

More government MPs come out in support of outlawing live sheep exports
Late last week it seemed that the Turnbull government had stared down the intense political pressure to close down live sheep exports. But it now seems some of its own backbenchers, including a former minister, are agitating for change.

Investigation to go ahead into Israeli response to Gaza protest shootings
An international investigation will examine Israel's lethal response to protest in Gaza, which have left more than 100 Palestinians dead this year. Protests and shootings at Israel's fence around Gaza are a long running feature of life Palestinian territory.

Stargazers turn their eyes to the sky in a record attempt
Thousands of amateur astronomers will this week attempt to break the world record for the most stargazers at multiple venues. It's part of the BBC's popular Stargazing Live program, and it's co-host, Professor Brian Cox, has done as much as anyone to take science, and particularly astronomy to a mass audience.

Hundreds of Commonwealth Games attendees are asking for protection visas
Lawyer David Manne says he is representing a number of people who attended the Commonwealth Games and are now seeking asylum in Australia.

7.30: May 21, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
30:22
Family businesses sent to the wall by their own banks The Banking Royal Commission has today been hearing about the dysfunctional world of lending to small business. Two business owners tell 7.30 their stories about dealing with the banks. One even blames his lender for sending him broke. More government MPs come out in support of outlawing live sheep exports Late last week it seemed that the Turnbull government had stared down the intense political pressure to close down live sheep exports. But it now seems some of its own backbenchers, including a former minister, are agitating for change. Investigation to go ahead into Israeli response to Gaza protest shootings An international investigation will examine Israel's lethal response to protest in Gaza, which have left more than 100 Palestinians dead this year. Protests and shootings at Israel's fence around Gaza are a long running feature of life Palestinian territory. Stargazers turn their eyes to the sky in a record attempt Thousands of amateur astronomers will this week attempt to break the world record for the most stargazers at multiple venues. It's part of the BBC's popular Stargazing Live program, and it's co-host, Professor Brian Cox, has done as much as anyone to take science, and particularly astronomy to a mass audience. Hundreds of Commonwealth Games attendees are asking for protection visas Lawyer David Manne says he is representing a number of people who attended the Commonwealth Games and are now seeking asylum in Australia.
Indigenous Runner Takes on Boston Marathon
Zibeon Fielding has gone from the red dirt of Mimili in outback Australia to the cold wet streets of the US to compete in the gruelling Boston Marathon. Part of former champion Robet De Castella's Indigenous Marathon Foundation, he's running to raise money for diabetes sufferers in his community - and be a role model for his young daughter.

Irwin to Receive Star On The Hollywood Walk Of Fame
The Crocodile Hunter, Steve Irwin, died 12 years ago. Now he's getting a star on Hollywood's Walk of Fame. Terri Irwin reflects on her husband's legacy.

Former FBI Boss Questions if Trump is Fit for Office
Leigh Sales talks about the reaction to James Comey's book covering his dealings with Donald Trump, as she prepares to interview the former FBI chief.

A Regional WA Town Fighting Back Against Ice
Barely a week goes by without another expose of hopeless addiction and lives destroyed by the drug ice. But in regional WA, where consumption of the drug is almost double the national average, one community is fighting back. Former addicts and their families are behind a push to get more users into rehab.

AMP Customers Charged for Financial Advice Never Received
One of the country's oldest and most trusted financial institutions charged thousands of customers for nothing, misled the corporate regulator and them tried to cover it up. AMP is the first financial institution to be questioned by the banking Royal Commission over the fee-for-no-service scandal.

7.30: April 18, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
30:16
Indigenous Runner Takes on Boston Marathon Zibeon Fielding has gone from the red dirt of Mimili in outback Australia to the cold wet streets of the US to compete in the gruelling Boston Marathon. Part of former champion Robet De Castella's Indigenous Marathon Foundation, he's running to raise money for diabetes sufferers in his community - and be a role model for his young daughter. Irwin to Receive Star On The Hollywood Walk Of Fame The Crocodile Hunter, Steve Irwin, died 12 years ago. Now he's getting a star on Hollywood's Walk of Fame. Terri Irwin reflects on her husband's legacy. Former FBI Boss Questions if Trump is Fit for Office Leigh Sales talks about the reaction to James Comey's book covering his dealings with Donald Trump, as she prepares to interview the former FBI chief. A Regional WA Town Fighting Back Against Ice Barely a week goes by without another expose of hopeless addiction and lives destroyed by the drug ice. But in regional WA, where consumption of the drug is almost double the national average, one community is fighting back. Former addicts and their families are behind a push to get more users into rehab. AMP Customers Charged for Financial Advice Never Received One of the country's oldest and most trusted financial institutions charged thousands of customers for nothing, misled the corporate regulator and them tried to cover it up. AMP is the first financial institution to be questioned by the banking Royal Commission over the fee-for-no-service scandal.
Complict
Complicit: the workers paying the price for our mobile phone obsession.
"There were iPhone screens and Nokia screens...I held the phone screen in my left hand, and a piece of cloth in my right hand... Wiping was the only thing I did besides eating and sleeping." Teenage worker
Mobile phones, smartphones and tablets have revolutionised the way we communicate but the technology we are addicted to has had toxic consequences.
"I knew we worked with chemicals, but I had no idea that it's poison." Young worker
China produces approximately 90% of the world's consumer electronics. The factories making the components for these electronic goods are filled with young workers. Some have been exposed to poisonous chemicals, with devastating results.
"Many co-workers developed the exact same symptoms. When I walked, it looked like I had uneven legs. It would take 10 minutes to take a two-minute walk. My legs felt too heavy to move." Worker
This investigation, filmed secretly over four years, exposed the use of harmful chemicals in the factories producing the products many of us use. Hidden cameras captured the working conditions inside the factories churning out these products.
"It was the cleaning solution he used, which contained benzene, when he was working at the electronics factory that caused his disease." Father of sick worker
The film charts the growing realisation amongst the workers that their illnesses stem from their work and follows their fight for compensation.
"After we discovered so many workers with leukemia...more media reports followed up and showed that these workers were chemically poisoned." Worker activist
The landmark investigation led Apple to ban the use of benzene, a known carcinogen, and n-hexane, a chemical that damages the nervous system.
But the ban does not apply to subcontractors who make up two-thirds of Apple's supply chain. And around 500 other chemicals are still used to produce electronics, mostly in the developing world, where there are few or no regulations to protect the workers who make them.
"Many of the workers that I've helped got occupational diseases due to exposure to toxic chemicals. Many are from the electronics industry. They made cell phones, computers, semiconductors etc." Worker activist.

Four Corners: May 21, 2018

News and current affairs, Civics and citizenship

Years 11-12 News and current affairs, Civics and citizenship
43:45
Complict Complicit: the workers paying the price for our mobile phone obsession. "There were iPhone screens and Nokia screens...I held the phone screen in my left hand, and a piece of cloth in my right hand... Wiping was the only thing I did besides eating and sleeping." Teenage worker Mobile phones, smartphones and tablets have revolutionised the way we communicate but the technology we are addicted to has had toxic consequences. "I knew we worked with chemicals, but I had no idea that it's poison." Young worker China produces approximately 90% of the world's consumer electronics. The factories making the components for these electronic goods are filled with young workers. Some have been exposed to poisonous chemicals, with devastating results. "Many co-workers developed the exact same symptoms. When I walked, it looked like I had uneven legs. It would take 10 minutes to take a two-minute walk. My legs felt too heavy to move." Worker This investigation, filmed secretly over four years, exposed the use of harmful chemicals in the factories producing the products many of us use. Hidden cameras captured the working conditions inside the factories churning out these products. "It was the cleaning solution he used, which contained benzene, when he was working at the electronics factory that caused his disease." Father of sick worker The film charts the growing realisation amongst the workers that their illnesses stem from their work and follows their fight for compensation. "After we discovered so many workers with leukemia...more media reports followed up and showed that these workers were chemically poisoned." Worker activist The landmark investigation led Apple to ban the use of benzene, a known carcinogen, and n-hexane, a chemical that damages the nervous system. But the ban does not apply to subcontractors who make up two-thirds of Apple's supply chain. And around 500 other chemicals are still used to produce electronics, mostly in the developing world, where there are few or no regulations to protect the workers who make them. "Many of the workers that I've helped got occupational diseases due to exposure to toxic chemicals. Many are from the electronics industry. They made cell phones, computers, semiconductors etc." Worker activist.
Family businesses sent to the wall by their own banks
The Banking Royal Commission has today been hearing about the dysfunctional world of lending to small business. Two business owners tell 7.30 their stories about dealing with the banks. One even blames his lender for sending him broke.

More government MPs come out in support of outlawing live sheep exports
Late last week it seemed that the Turnbull government had stared down the intense political pressure to close down live sheep exports. But it now seems some of its own backbenchers, including a former minister, are agitating for change.

Investigation to go ahead into Israeli response to Gaza protest shootings
An international investigation will examine Israel's lethal response to protest in Gaza, which have left more than 100 Palestinians dead this year. Protests and shootings at Israel's fence around Gaza are a long running feature of life Palestinian territory.

Stargazers turn their eyes to the sky in a record attempt
Thousands of amateur astronomers will this week attempt to break the world record for the most stargazers at multiple venues. It's part of the BBC's popular Stargazing Live program, and it's co-host, Professor Brian Cox, has done as much as anyone to take science, and particularly astronomy to a mass audience.

Hundreds of Commonwealth Games attendees are asking for protection visas
Lawyer David Manne says he is representing a number of people who attended the Commonwealth Games and are now seeking asylum in Australia.

7.30: May 21, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
30:22
Family businesses sent to the wall by their own banks The Banking Royal Commission has today been hearing about the dysfunctional world of lending to small business. Two business owners tell 7.30 their stories about dealing with the banks. One even blames his lender for sending him broke. More government MPs come out in support of outlawing live sheep exports Late last week it seemed that the Turnbull government had stared down the intense political pressure to close down live sheep exports. But it now seems some of its own backbenchers, including a former minister, are agitating for change. Investigation to go ahead into Israeli response to Gaza protest shootings An international investigation will examine Israel's lethal response to protest in Gaza, which have left more than 100 Palestinians dead this year. Protests and shootings at Israel's fence around Gaza are a long running feature of life Palestinian territory. Stargazers turn their eyes to the sky in a record attempt Thousands of amateur astronomers will this week attempt to break the world record for the most stargazers at multiple venues. It's part of the BBC's popular Stargazing Live program, and it's co-host, Professor Brian Cox, has done as much as anyone to take science, and particularly astronomy to a mass audience. Hundreds of Commonwealth Games attendees are asking for protection visas Lawyer David Manne says he is representing a number of people who attended the Commonwealth Games and are now seeking asylum in Australia.
The Teller
The regard which Australians have for banks has never been lower, and with the banking Royal Commission recommencing its public hearings on Monday, it will probably sink even further. Liz Hayes meets a very brave former bank worker who, through shame, feels compelled to speak out. For three decades Catherine was a teller. She says at first it was an honourable job, and she genuinely thought her role was to help the customers, but then the banks started putting profits before people - and her bosses made her do the same.
The dirty tricks Catherine reveals provide an alarming insight into the culture of Australian banking institutions.

The Holy Real Estate
The great prize in the battle for dominance between Israelis and Palestinians is Jerusalem. Ironically, its name means “city of peace”, but that’s something neither side seems to want. This week there were more protests, and more deaths, after the United States relocated its embassy to the holy city. The move recognises Jerusalem as the capital of the Jewish state and that enrages Palestinians like nothing else.

The Royal Wedding
Allison Langdon reports on the most anticipated wedding in years, and asks palace insiders where to now for the Royal newlyweds?
The week leading up to her wedding to Prince Harry is not what Meghan Markle ever would have expected – with her own family stealing the bride-to-be’s limelight. While it has been a stressful time for Ms Markle, there’s one thing Hollywood celebrities and the Royal Family both understand – the show must go on!

60 Minutes: May 20, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs
47:25
The Teller The regard which Australians have for banks has never been lower, and with the banking Royal Commission recommencing its public hearings on Monday, it will probably sink even further. Liz Hayes meets a very brave former bank worker who, through shame, feels compelled to speak out. For three decades Catherine was a teller. She says at first it was an honourable job, and she genuinely thought her role was to help the customers, but then the banks started putting profits before people - and her bosses made her do the same. The dirty tricks Catherine reveals provide an alarming insight into the culture of Australian banking institutions. The Holy Real Estate The great prize in the battle for dominance between Israelis and Palestinians is Jerusalem. Ironically, its name means “city of peace”, but that’s something neither side seems to want. This week there were more protests, and more deaths, after the United States relocated its embassy to the holy city. The move recognises Jerusalem as the capital of the Jewish state and that enrages Palestinians like nothing else. The Royal Wedding Allison Langdon reports on the most anticipated wedding in years, and asks palace insiders where to now for the Royal newlyweds? The week leading up to her wedding to Prince Harry is not what Meghan Markle ever would have expected – with her own family stealing the bride-to-be’s limelight. While it has been a stressful time for Ms Markle, there’s one thing Hollywood celebrities and the Royal Family both understand – the show must go on!
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