7.30

7.30

February 13, 2018
ABC  |  February 13, 2018
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This video has closed captioning

New Acland Coal Mine Expansion Back On the Table
For nearly a decade, local Queensland farmers and environment groups have fought against the proposed expansion of New Acland Coal's mine. Last year they were victorious – the Queensland Land Court threw out the proposal. Now it is back on the table.

Farmers Say Murray Darling River System is Broken
Tomorrow the Senate will vote on a proposal to reduce the amount of water Queensland irrigators are required to put back into the Murray Darling River system. Some farmers say the system is broken. One irrigator is at the centre of a Queensland major crime investigation.

Truss Says Joyce's Leadership is 'Diminished'
Former deputy prime minister and long-serving National Party leader, Warren Truss, joins 7.30 to give his perspective on Barnaby Joyce's situation.

National Party Consider Asking Joyce to Step Down
Tonight, a group within the National Party is attempting to form a delegation to ask leader Barnaby Joyce to resign.

'Naughty Boy': What Barnaby Joyce's Constituents Think
Amid calls for the National Party leader to resign, 7.30 spoke with the people of Tamworth, the heart of Barnaby Joyce's seat of New England, to see what they think.

New Acland Coal Mine Expansion Back On the Table
For nearly a decade, local Queensland farmers and environment groups have fought against the proposed expansion of New Acland Coal's mine. Last year they were victorious – the Queensland Land Court threw out the proposal. Now it is back on the table.

Farmers Say Murray Darling River System is Broken
Tomorrow the Senate will vote on a proposal to reduce the amount of water Queensland irrigators are required to put back into the Murray Darling River system. Some farmers say the system is broken. One irrigator is at the centre of a Queensland major crime investigation.

Truss Says Joyce's Leadership is 'Diminished'
Former deputy prime minister and long-serving National Party leader, Warren Truss, joins 7.30 to give his perspective on Barnaby Joyce's situation.

National Party Consider Asking Joyce to Step Down
Tonight, a group within the National Party is attempting to form a delegation to ask leader Barnaby Joyce to resign.

'Naughty Boy': What Barnaby Joyce's Constituents Think
Amid calls for the National Party leader to resign, 7.30 spoke with the people of Tamworth, the heart of Barnaby Joyce's seat of New England, to see what they think.

Tasmania's Anglican church
Does a church need a physical building? It's a question being asked in Tasmania - where some communities are fighting a plan to sell off more than 70 churches across the state. The money raised will help pay compensation to survivors of child sexual abuse.
New ACTU President Michele O'Neil 
New ACTU President Michele O'Neil's goal is nothing less than a re-shaping of Australia's industrial landscape: the re-introduction of sector wide bargaining rather than having workers struggle to secure pay rises enterprise by enterprise, and a campaign for a living wage.
New data 
New census data shows that the face of Australia is changing, with fewer migrants coming from Europe. The majority of new Australians coming here on skilled migrant visas - or to join other family members - and are far more likely to become new homeowners.
One retirement village
As Australia's population ages and medical technology improves the chances of many of us making it to 100 has also increased. On the NSW Central Coast there's an aged care home that has not just one, but half a dozen centenarians - all women. The oldest was born in late 1913 before the outbreak of World War One.
Bullying
One in four Australian children is frequently bullied - and the consequences can be serious or even fatal. With a state election looming in Victoria, politicians are promising the country's biggest anti-bullying program. Advocates hope the political fight is the momentum needed to propel bullying onto the federal agenda.

7.30: Tasmanian Anglican Church/Michele O'Neil/ New Data/Retirement Village/Bullying

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
30:13
Tasmania's Anglican church Does a church need a physical building? It's a question being asked in Tasmania - where some communities are fighting a plan to sell off more than 70 churches across the state. The money raised will help pay compensation to survivors of child sexual abuse. New ACTU President Michele O'Neil New ACTU President Michele O'Neil's goal is nothing less than a re-shaping of Australia's industrial landscape: the re-introduction of sector wide bargaining rather than having workers struggle to secure pay rises enterprise by enterprise, and a campaign for a living wage. New data New census data shows that the face of Australia is changing, with fewer migrants coming from Europe. The majority of new Australians coming here on skilled migrant visas - or to join other family members - and are far more likely to become new homeowners. One retirement village As Australia's population ages and medical technology improves the chances of many of us making it to 100 has also increased. On the NSW Central Coast there's an aged care home that has not just one, but half a dozen centenarians - all women. The oldest was born in late 1913 before the outbreak of World War One. Bullying One in four Australian children is frequently bullied - and the consequences can be serious or even fatal. With a state election looming in Victoria, politicians are promising the country's biggest anti-bullying program. Advocates hope the political fight is the momentum needed to propel bullying onto the federal agenda.
Trevor Ruthenberg 
7.30's political correspondent Laura Tingle speaks to the LNP candidate in the Longman by-election, Trevor Ruthenberg, who apologised after wrongly claiming he won the Australian Service Medal.
Banks moving to tighten lending rules 
With Royal Commission exposing examples of banks underestimating people's household expenditure and waving through loans in order to hit mortgage targets, lenders are now tightening the rules on handing out mortgage cash. But for some families it's come too late to save them from financial distress.
Government considers tighten surveillance on convicted terrorists
The Federal government is considering tightening surveillance on convicted terrorists once they've served their time behind bars. It's looking at what they are calling Extended Supervision Orders for people convicted of terrorist-related offences who are released from prison but still deemed to be a threat to the community. Director of Terrorism Studies at Charles Sturt University, Levi West, discusses what it means.
Chronic fatigue treatments
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, now called MECFS, is being investigated by a government appointed committee. There are about 200,000 Australian sufferers of the condition, which has no definitive cause or diagnostic test, but does have an often recommended treatment which some say risks harm and is "old fashioned". Their concern is that the specialist recommending this controversial treatment is advising the government committee on future treatment.

Retirement homes of the future
Australia's greying population means that by the middle of this century one in four of us will be aged 65 or over. It's already caused a boom in investment in retirement and aged care options, as businesses look for new ways to capture the ageing market. Many are thinking outside the square with new approaches, that are making old-fashioned retirement villages and nursing homes a thing of the past.

7.30: Trevor Ruthenberg/ Lending Rules/ Tight Surveillance/ Chronic Fatigue Treatments/ Retirement Homes of the Future

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
30:44
Trevor Ruthenberg 7.30's political correspondent Laura Tingle speaks to the LNP candidate in the Longman by-election, Trevor Ruthenberg, who apologised after wrongly claiming he won the Australian Service Medal. Banks moving to tighten lending rules With Royal Commission exposing examples of banks underestimating people's household expenditure and waving through loans in order to hit mortgage targets, lenders are now tightening the rules on handing out mortgage cash. But for some families it's come too late to save them from financial distress. Government considers tighten surveillance on convicted terrorists The Federal government is considering tightening surveillance on convicted terrorists once they've served their time behind bars. It's looking at what they are calling Extended Supervision Orders for people convicted of terrorist-related offences who are released from prison but still deemed to be a threat to the community. Director of Terrorism Studies at Charles Sturt University, Levi West, discusses what it means. Chronic fatigue treatments Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, now called MECFS, is being investigated by a government appointed committee. There are about 200,000 Australian sufferers of the condition, which has no definitive cause or diagnostic test, but does have an often recommended treatment which some say risks harm and is "old fashioned". Their concern is that the specialist recommending this controversial treatment is advising the government committee on future treatment. Retirement homes of the future Australia's greying population means that by the middle of this century one in four of us will be aged 65 or over. It's already caused a boom in investment in retirement and aged care options, as businesses look for new ways to capture the ageing market. Many are thinking outside the square with new approaches, that are making old-fashioned retirement villages and nursing homes a thing of the past.
Malcolm Turnbull 
Laura Tingle discusses the latest from Canberra, including electricity prices and the possibility of the government funding a new coal-fired power station.
Croatia 
Millions of fans will watch the World Cup decider this weekend - a David and Goliath contest between a football powerhouse and a tiny country that's never made the final before. After beating England, Croatia will take on the tournament favourites France in the final.
Mortgage Choice 
One of Australia's biggest publicly listed brokers, Mortgage Choice, has an overhaul of its remuneration model. It says it will now pay franchisees more and reduce the volatility of their income. It comes after complaints from franchisees, who said Mortgage Choice's business model was leaving some brokers in financial ruin.
Trump set to meet NATO leaders as part of European visit
US President starts the beginning of what promises to be stormy week-long visit to Europe with a NATO meeting in Belgium. Rachael Rizzo of the Centre for a New American Security discusses what may happen.
Miss America beauty pageant 
For the first time in nearly 100 years, when young women vying for the title of Miss America appear on stage in Atlantic City this September it won't be in swimsuits. In the #MeToo era, the historic pageant is promising Miss America 2.0 will focus on contestants talents, intelligence and ideas - not their outward appearance. But not everyone is happy to say bye-bye to the bikinis.

7.30: Malcolm Turnbull/Croatia/Mortgage Choice/Trump Meets NATO Leaders/Miss America Beauty Pageant

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
30:36
Malcolm Turnbull Laura Tingle discusses the latest from Canberra, including electricity prices and the possibility of the government funding a new coal-fired power station. Croatia Millions of fans will watch the World Cup decider this weekend - a David and Goliath contest between a football powerhouse and a tiny country that's never made the final before. After beating England, Croatia will take on the tournament favourites France in the final. Mortgage Choice One of Australia's biggest publicly listed brokers, Mortgage Choice, has an overhaul of its remuneration model. It says it will now pay franchisees more and reduce the volatility of their income. It comes after complaints from franchisees, who said Mortgage Choice's business model was leaving some brokers in financial ruin. Trump set to meet NATO leaders as part of European visit US President starts the beginning of what promises to be stormy week-long visit to Europe with a NATO meeting in Belgium. Rachael Rizzo of the Centre for a New American Security discusses what may happen. Miss America beauty pageant For the first time in nearly 100 years, when young women vying for the title of Miss America appear on stage in Atlantic City this September it won't be in swimsuits. In the #MeToo era, the historic pageant is promising Miss America 2.0 will focus on contestants talents, intelligence and ideas - not their outward appearance. But not everyone is happy to say bye-bye to the bikinis.
Fortnite Phenomenon 
If you have kids, chances are they're among the 125 million people playing the popular video game Fortnite. And it's driving some parents and teachers crazy. They are flocking to professional help to pry their kids away but for others the game is just like any other hobby - it's all about balance.
Bernard Collaery
Unprecedented legal action against two men for allegedly breaching the intelligence services act has sparked fierce debate about the balance between national security and the public's right to know.
Rod Sims 
Australia's competition watchdog has laid out a sweeping plan to bring those bills down and says it could save households up to $400 a year. Rod Sims outlines what the ACCC has in mind.
Rural Mental Health
A western Victorian farmer has come up with a bald plan to give his industry national exposure. He's convincing an increasing number of his colleagues to take their kit off. It's part of a cheeky new campaign called "The Naked Farmer", which aims to raise awareness of - and funding for - mental health.
Dept. of Veterans' Affairs
Last month 7.30 aired a story about the extraordinary lengths the Department of Veterans' Affairs went to, to thwart a compensation claim: secretly changing its own policy in order to stop a claim by a former elite paratrooper who had badly injured his back. We've now learnt the head of the Veterans' Affairs department has requested a meeting with Mr Rollins in order to issue a personal apology. The ministers for Defence and Veterans Affairs have also ordered a departmental review into the matter.

7.30: Fortnite Phenomenon/ Bernard Collaery/Rod Sims/Rural Mental Health/Dept. of Veteran Affairs

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
31:31
Fortnite Phenomenon If you have kids, chances are they're among the 125 million people playing the popular video game Fortnite. And it's driving some parents and teachers crazy. They are flocking to professional help to pry their kids away but for others the game is just like any other hobby - it's all about balance. Bernard Collaery Unprecedented legal action against two men for allegedly breaching the intelligence services act has sparked fierce debate about the balance between national security and the public's right to know. Rod Sims Australia's competition watchdog has laid out a sweeping plan to bring those bills down and says it could save households up to $400 a year. Rod Sims outlines what the ACCC has in mind. Rural Mental Health A western Victorian farmer has come up with a bald plan to give his industry national exposure. He's convincing an increasing number of his colleagues to take their kit off. It's part of a cheeky new campaign called "The Naked Farmer", which aims to raise awareness of - and funding for - mental health. Dept. of Veterans' Affairs Last month 7.30 aired a story about the extraordinary lengths the Department of Veterans' Affairs went to, to thwart a compensation claim: secretly changing its own policy in order to stop a claim by a former elite paratrooper who had badly injured his back. We've now learnt the head of the Veterans' Affairs department has requested a meeting with Mr Rollins in order to issue a personal apology. The ministers for Defence and Veterans Affairs have also ordered a departmental review into the matter.
Secret Suburban
Crime syndicates are growing tonnes of cannabis in suburban houses across Australia. Police don't know quite how big the problem is, but know that these cannabis grow houses produce more of the drug than any other method, and that the majority of these houses are owned by Vietnamese organised crime networks.
Sarah Hanson-Young 
Sarah Hanson Young says comments made about her by David Leyonhjelm in a senate debate have brought the entire parliament into disrepute.
David Leyonhjelm
During a Senate debate, Senator David Leyonhjelm called out across the chamber to Senator Sarah Hanson-Young for her to "stop shagging men". That was during a debate about "protecting women", in the form of pepper spray and tasers. The comments have been widely condemned, but Senator Leyonhjelm says he was justified.
Labor's corporate tax policy
For months, Labor's commanded an election-winning lead in the polls but a messy few days last week has put the opposition on the back foot. Opposition Leader Bill Shorten improvised on Labor's company tax policy, forcing a retreat 72 hours later. Opposition Finance spokesman, Jim Chalmers explains Labor's position.
Judith Durham
Folk group The Seekers had six top 10 hits during 1965 and 1966 – making singer Judith Durham a household name. She went on to pursue a successful solo career and has recorded more than a dozen albums over fifty years. It's Judith Durham's birthday tomorrow and to celebrate, she's releasing a new record.

7.30: Secret Suburban/Sarah Hanson-Young/David Leyonhjelm/Labor's Corporate Tax Policy/Judith Durham

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
31:09
Secret Suburban Crime syndicates are growing tonnes of cannabis in suburban houses across Australia. Police don't know quite how big the problem is, but know that these cannabis grow houses produce more of the drug than any other method, and that the majority of these houses are owned by Vietnamese organised crime networks. Sarah Hanson-Young Sarah Hanson Young says comments made about her by David Leyonhjelm in a senate debate have brought the entire parliament into disrepute. David Leyonhjelm During a Senate debate, Senator David Leyonhjelm called out across the chamber to Senator Sarah Hanson-Young for her to "stop shagging men". That was during a debate about "protecting women", in the form of pepper spray and tasers. The comments have been widely condemned, but Senator Leyonhjelm says he was justified. Labor's corporate tax policy For months, Labor's commanded an election-winning lead in the polls but a messy few days last week has put the opposition on the back foot. Opposition Leader Bill Shorten improvised on Labor's company tax policy, forcing a retreat 72 hours later. Opposition Finance spokesman, Jim Chalmers explains Labor's position. Judith Durham Folk group The Seekers had six top 10 hits during 1965 and 1966 – making singer Judith Durham a household name. She went on to pursue a successful solo career and has recorded more than a dozen albums over fifty years. It's Judith Durham's birthday tomorrow and to celebrate, she's releasing a new record.
Gamble of life
Soon after meeting and falling in love, Andrew and Olivia Densley agreed they both adored kids and wanted a large family. They got married and got on with their dream. But after having their fourth child they received terrible news. Their third child, a son, had a genetic immune deficiency disease which looked likely to kill him. Just when all seemed lost though, he was saved by a long-shot miracle. His little brother, the couple’s fourth child, was a match as a bone marrow donor. But as Tom Steinfort reports, at this point the story gets even more complicated. While Andrew and Olivia knew the substantial risks of having more children, it didn’t stop them. Olivia fell pregnant with a fifth child who was also born with the usually fatal disease. But having rolled the dice and lost, the couple refused to give up. It has taken several years and a hundred thousand dollars, but they’ve managed to engineer another extraordinary solution.
A magpie called Penguin
Somewhere, flying around the northern beaches of Sydney, is a magpie called Penguin who often thinks she’s a human. And if that’s not incredible enough, this amazing bird has another claim to fame – she’s a lifesaver. Penguin taught Sam Bloom, a mother of three, how to live again after she fell from a balcony, broke her back and became a paraplegic. It’s a truly inspiring tale that not surprisingly will also soon be a Hollywood movie

60 Minutes: Gamble of life/ A Magpie called Penguin

News and current affairs

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs
48:40
Gamble of life Soon after meeting and falling in love, Andrew and Olivia Densley agreed they both adored kids and wanted a large family. They got married and got on with their dream. But after having their fourth child they received terrible news. Their third child, a son, had a genetic immune deficiency disease which looked likely to kill him. Just when all seemed lost though, he was saved by a long-shot miracle. His little brother, the couple’s fourth child, was a match as a bone marrow donor. But as Tom Steinfort reports, at this point the story gets even more complicated. While Andrew and Olivia knew the substantial risks of having more children, it didn’t stop them. Olivia fell pregnant with a fifth child who was also born with the usually fatal disease. But having rolled the dice and lost, the couple refused to give up. It has taken several years and a hundred thousand dollars, but they’ve managed to engineer another extraordinary solution. A magpie called Penguin Somewhere, flying around the northern beaches of Sydney, is a magpie called Penguin who often thinks she’s a human. And if that’s not incredible enough, this amazing bird has another claim to fame – she’s a lifesaver. Penguin taught Sam Bloom, a mother of three, how to live again after she fell from a balcony, broke her back and became a paraplegic. It’s a truly inspiring tale that not surprisingly will also soon be a Hollywood movie
Rural News
A look at rural and regional issues making the news this week.
Heywire: Muriel
Muriel Hunter had a tragic start to life and struggled in school, but now she's fulfilling her dream
Defying the Drought
A large part of eastern Australia is drought declared, and the big dry is hitting farmers and communities hard. But some farmers seem to be defying the drought. Marty McCarthy hits the road to meet them.
Hall of Fame
The rural press club honour is awarded to Queensland-based journalists who have made a significant contribution to the profession for more than 20 years and have helped support the next generation of rural journalists. Pip has been a reporter on the ABC’s flagship rural current affairs program Landline for the past 25 years and its host since 2012.
Open Sesame
Farmers and scientists in central Queensland have just trialled the country’s first commercial crop of black sesame seed and early results are showing great potential.
Markets Report
Market activity and analysis with Kerry Lonergan.
Farm Tech
Farmers have partnered with programmers, engineers and inventors to help make farming more efficient. It’s part of a University ‘Tech-Connect’ program and together they’ve come up with some very creative solutions to some everyday on-farm problems.

Landline: August 12, 2018

Business and economics, Earth and environment, Sustainability, News and current affairs

Years 9-10, 11-12 Business and economics, Earth and environment, Sustainability, News and current affairs
57:15
Rural News A look at rural and regional issues making the news this week. Heywire: Muriel Muriel Hunter had a tragic start to life and struggled in school, but now she's fulfilling her dream Defying the Drought A large part of eastern Australia is drought declared, and the big dry is hitting farmers and communities hard. But some farmers seem to be defying the drought. Marty McCarthy hits the road to meet them. Hall of Fame The rural press club honour is awarded to Queensland-based journalists who have made a significant contribution to the profession for more than 20 years and have helped support the next generation of rural journalists. Pip has been a reporter on the ABC’s flagship rural current affairs program Landline for the past 25 years and its host since 2012. Open Sesame Farmers and scientists in central Queensland have just trialled the country’s first commercial crop of black sesame seed and early results are showing great potential. Markets Report Market activity and analysis with Kerry Lonergan. Farm Tech Farmers have partnered with programmers, engineers and inventors to help make farming more efficient. It’s part of a University ‘Tech-Connect’ program and together they’ve come up with some very creative solutions to some everyday on-farm problems.
From Fortnite to Candy Crush, for many people video games are a source of entertainment, relaxation, a chance to build friendships, or a career.
But for a minority, games can be a problem.
With 67 per cent of Australians playing video games, and 97 per cent of households with children having video games, Insight asks, “how much is too much? When does video gaming stop being fun?”
Laurie Darby represents the fastest growing segment of the population new to games - the over 65s. Retired and living alone, she tells Jenny Brockie that she checks in daily with her family and friends by playing word games on her mobile.
Zion, 11, loves playing Fortnite with his friends, and his mother, Rosie, works hard to set boundaries around his gaming. “He has other responsibilities he has to do first, like his homework, and walking and picking up after the dog,” she explains.
For Taei Aluni and Maddelin Walster, video games are a source of tension. Taei would keep playing if he was allowed to, but Maddelin says he’s “like a vacant partner” when he’s on the games, and it’s affecting their family.
In the wake of the World Health Organisation including “gaming disorder” in its latest International Classification of Diseases, Insight considers whether or not it’s the personality of the gamer, or features built into the games themselves, which sees some people become hooked, while others manage to keep it just for fun.

Insight: Game On

News and current affairs, Intercultural understanding

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs, Intercultural understanding
52:16
From Fortnite to Candy Crush, for many people video games are a source of entertainment, relaxation, a chance to build friendships, or a career. But for a minority, games can be a problem. With 67 per cent of Australians playing video games, and 97 per cent of households with children having video games, Insight asks, “how much is too much? When does video gaming stop being fun?” Laurie Darby represents the fastest growing segment of the population new to games - the over 65s. Retired and living alone, she tells Jenny Brockie that she checks in daily with her family and friends by playing word games on her mobile. Zion, 11, loves playing Fortnite with his friends, and his mother, Rosie, works hard to set boundaries around his gaming. “He has other responsibilities he has to do first, like his homework, and walking and picking up after the dog,” she explains. For Taei Aluni and Maddelin Walster, video games are a source of tension. Taei would keep playing if he was allowed to, but Maddelin says he’s “like a vacant partner” when he’s on the games, and it’s affecting their family. In the wake of the World Health Organisation including “gaming disorder” in its latest International Classification of Diseases, Insight considers whether or not it’s the personality of the gamer, or features built into the games themselves, which sees some people become hooked, while others manage to keep it just for fun.
This week on Dateline, we meet the young journalists trying to unite Rio de Janeiro’s favelas through a news site, started by a local when he was just 11 years old.
When the police come ‘pow, pow, pow’. You get down. Everyone runs into the corridors!”
It’s a tough pill to swallow, but this is the every day reality for children who go to school in Rio de Janeiro’s favelas.
With members from rival drug gangs manning every street corner, and a military campaign adamant on stamping out drug related violence, navigating these slums has become a matter of life and death for most residents. In 2017 alone, 6,731 people lost their lives to violent crimes in Rio.
13 years ago, Rene Silva founded his community newspaper, Voz das Comunidades (VOZ). Once a small-time paper operating from Rene’s home, the young journalists working for VOZ now have deep ties in local communities, and often serve as a point of reference for the larger Brazilian press.
Kitted out in VOZ polos, the reporters use their smartphones and social media to give voice to parents like Fabio and Paloma Morre, who lost their son, Benjamin, to the crossfire between local police and drug traffickers. He was just shy of two years old.
His father, Fabio, waves his phone – with a video of a toddler laughing playing on the screen - at the young journalist interviewing him.
“This is one of the last pictures I took with him – this is a video of him dancing!”
It’s a scene journalist Luana Melo has seen all too many times before.
“It’s important for us to tell the story of the day Benjamin died. So these incidents won’t happen inside the favelas, with such violence.”

Dateline: Children Caught in the Crossfire

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
25:07
This week on Dateline, we meet the young journalists trying to unite Rio de Janeiro’s favelas through a news site, started by a local when he was just 11 years old. When the police come ‘pow, pow, pow’. You get down. Everyone runs into the corridors!” It’s a tough pill to swallow, but this is the every day reality for children who go to school in Rio de Janeiro’s favelas. With members from rival drug gangs manning every street corner, and a military campaign adamant on stamping out drug related violence, navigating these slums has become a matter of life and death for most residents. In 2017 alone, 6,731 people lost their lives to violent crimes in Rio. 13 years ago, Rene Silva founded his community newspaper, Voz das Comunidades (VOZ). Once a small-time paper operating from Rene’s home, the young journalists working for VOZ now have deep ties in local communities, and often serve as a point of reference for the larger Brazilian press. Kitted out in VOZ polos, the reporters use their smartphones and social media to give voice to parents like Fabio and Paloma Morre, who lost their son, Benjamin, to the crossfire between local police and drug traffickers. He was just shy of two years old. His father, Fabio, waves his phone – with a video of a toddler laughing playing on the screen - at the young journalist interviewing him. “This is one of the last pictures I took with him – this is a video of him dancing!” It’s a scene journalist Luana Melo has seen all too many times before. “It’s important for us to tell the story of the day Benjamin died. So these incidents won’t happen inside the favelas, with such violence.”
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