7.30

7.30

February 12, 2018
ABC  |  February 12, 2018
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Meet Australia's First Indigenous Winter Olympian
Harley Windsor will make history as Australia's first Indigenous Winter Olympian. Together with his Russian-born partner he will compete for the nation's first Olympic medal in figure skating.

Man Accused of Orchestrating Bali Bombings Yet to Face Trial
For more than a decade the man accused of orchestrating the Bali bombings, known as Hambali, has sat in a cell at Guantanamo Bay. He is yet to face trial. Stephanie March sat down for an exclusive interview with Hambali’s legal team at Guantanamo.

Morrison Says Joyce's Marriage Breakup 'Very Disappointing'
Treasurer Scott Morrison joins 7.30 to discuss Barnaby Joyce, the banking royal commission and the proposed company tax cut.

More Questions Asked About Joyce's Extramarital Affair
Deputy Prime Minister Barnaby Joyce's personal crisis continues to blow back on the Turnbull government, with a number of unanswered questions about how his extramarital affair spilt into the workplace.

Meet Australia's First Indigenous Winter Olympian
Harley Windsor will make history as Australia's first Indigenous Winter Olympian. Together with his Russian-born partner he will compete for the nation's first Olympic medal in figure skating.

Man Accused of Orchestrating Bali Bombings Yet to Face Trial
For more than a decade the man accused of orchestrating the Bali bombings, known as Hambali, has sat in a cell at Guantanamo Bay. He is yet to face trial. Stephanie March sat down for an exclusive interview with Hambali’s legal team at Guantanamo.

Morrison Says Joyce's Marriage Breakup 'Very Disappointing'
Treasurer Scott Morrison joins 7.30 to discuss Barnaby Joyce, the banking royal commission and the proposed company tax cut.

More Questions Asked About Joyce's Extramarital Affair
Deputy Prime Minister Barnaby Joyce's personal crisis continues to blow back on the Turnbull government, with a number of unanswered questions about how his extramarital affair spilt into the workplace.

The man who broke Watergate talks about Donald Trump
Donald Trump may have popularised the term 'fake news', but the wild nature of his presidency has also spawned an extraordinary series of insider accounts of his chaotic White House. The latest and most substantial of these is 'Fear' by veteran Washington reporter Bob Woodward.
Young women and injuries
The introduction of an AFL women's competition, the rise of the Matildas, and the increasing popularity of women's cricket all reflect a huge increase in the popularity of women's team sport. But with this surge has come a significant increase in serious knee injuries. Women are up to ten times more likely to rupture their anterior cruciate ligament than men, and Australia has the highest rate of knee reconstructions in the world.
Energy distributors push for a cap on solar power
More than six solar panels are installed across Australia every minute of every day as people try to tackle rising power prices. But the industry that owns Australia's poles and wires says all that power from the sun is a problem and it could destabilise the electricity grid. The solar industry disagrees, and it's preparing for a fight with the power networks.
Asian elephants under threat 
The Asian elephant is one of the world's most majestic animals. But now these gentle giants face a threat that could wipe them out completely … poachers who want their skin.

7.30: October 15, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
29:08
The man who broke Watergate talks about Donald Trump Donald Trump may have popularised the term 'fake news', but the wild nature of his presidency has also spawned an extraordinary series of insider accounts of his chaotic White House. The latest and most substantial of these is 'Fear' by veteran Washington reporter Bob Woodward. Young women and injuries The introduction of an AFL women's competition, the rise of the Matildas, and the increasing popularity of women's cricket all reflect a huge increase in the popularity of women's team sport. But with this surge has come a significant increase in serious knee injuries. Women are up to ten times more likely to rupture their anterior cruciate ligament than men, and Australia has the highest rate of knee reconstructions in the world. Energy distributors push for a cap on solar power More than six solar panels are installed across Australia every minute of every day as people try to tackle rising power prices. But the industry that owns Australia's poles and wires says all that power from the sun is a problem and it could destabilise the electricity grid. The solar industry disagrees, and it's preparing for a fight with the power networks. Asian elephants under threat The Asian elephant is one of the world's most majestic animals. But now these gentle giants face a threat that could wipe them out completely … poachers who want their skin.
Religious Freedom
The warring forces within the federal Coalition have been notably silent in recent weeks, with all sides only too aware that such divisions could torpedo the chances their chances in the Wentworth by-election. But that peace was shattered today by the leaking of some details of a tightly-held report on proposed changes to religious freedom laws. The Australian Financial Review's political editor Phil Coorey discusses the latest developments.
South China Sea
Former US Director of National Intelligence, James Clapper, takes a look at what is happening in the South China Sea.
Tensions rise between China and the US
Tensions are rising between the world's two biggest economies. The tough talks follows last week's incident in the South China Sea, where warships from the United States and China came within 45 metres of colliding. The US is already locked in a trade war with Beijing and the US President has accused China of meddling in its upcoming elections.
Deadly dust
Silicosis is a potentially deadly lung disease mostly associated with the coal mining industry. But there has been a silicosis outbreak in Queensland among tradesmen who make kitchen and bathroom bench tops with engineered stone. Some of those workers and the medical profession are sounding the alarm about what they fear could become a public health emergency.
Richard Branson's personal appeal 
The executions of convicted drug smugglers Andrew Chan and Myuran Sukumaran in Indonesia in 2015 shocked Australia. But they also attracted global interest - including from some unlikely places. Virgin founder Sir Richard Branson is a passionate campaigner against the death penalty and made a personal appeal to Indonesia's president at the time to spare the couple.

7.30: October 10, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
31:07
Religious Freedom The warring forces within the federal Coalition have been notably silent in recent weeks, with all sides only too aware that such divisions could torpedo the chances their chances in the Wentworth by-election. But that peace was shattered today by the leaking of some details of a tightly-held report on proposed changes to religious freedom laws. The Australian Financial Review's political editor Phil Coorey discusses the latest developments. South China Sea Former US Director of National Intelligence, James Clapper, takes a look at what is happening in the South China Sea. Tensions rise between China and the US Tensions are rising between the world's two biggest economies. The tough talks follows last week's incident in the South China Sea, where warships from the United States and China came within 45 metres of colliding. The US is already locked in a trade war with Beijing and the US President has accused China of meddling in its upcoming elections. Deadly dust Silicosis is a potentially deadly lung disease mostly associated with the coal mining industry. But there has been a silicosis outbreak in Queensland among tradesmen who make kitchen and bathroom bench tops with engineered stone. Some of those workers and the medical profession are sounding the alarm about what they fear could become a public health emergency. Richard Branson's personal appeal The executions of convicted drug smugglers Andrew Chan and Myuran Sukumaran in Indonesia in 2015 shocked Australia. But they also attracted global interest - including from some unlikely places. Virgin founder Sir Richard Branson is a passionate campaigner against the death penalty and made a personal appeal to Indonesia's president at the time to spare the couple.
The Opera House: world heritage listed cultural precinct or Sydney's biggest billboard?
The decision to allow a horse race to be promoted on the Opera House sails has sparked outrage and questions reportedly being asked at UNESCO. But it's not just the Prime Minister who's defended the move. The NSW Premier and Racing NSW say the promotion is in line with previous sporting and cultural use building's sails. Former chief executive of the Sydney Opera House, Michael Lynch says the horse racing promotion proposed for the sails of the Opera House is 'highly inappropriate'.
Bill Hare discusses climate change report
The UN's intergovernmental panel on climate change released a report today which paints an alarming picture of the impact of a 2 per cent increase in global temperatures as a result of climate change. It says urgent and unprecedented action is needed to keep the increase to one and a half degrees. Dr Bill Hare of the CEO of Climate Analytics discusses what it means.
Alison Harcourt
Alison Harcourt may not be a household name, but the 88-year-old statistics pioneer is somewhat of a celebrity in some parts of the maths world. Her work has helped measure poverty in Australia and played a key role in amending the Electoral Act, and the octogenarian is still going strong and tutoring the next generation of young students.
Cable Beach
It's one of the most popular images in Australian tourism, camel trains silhouetted against a setting sun on Broome's Cable Beach. But there's trouble brewing in the remote paradise, as the camels share the beach with growing numbers of tourists and four wheel drive vehicles.

7.30: October 8, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
28:35
The Opera House: world heritage listed cultural precinct or Sydney's biggest billboard? The decision to allow a horse race to be promoted on the Opera House sails has sparked outrage and questions reportedly being asked at UNESCO. But it's not just the Prime Minister who's defended the move. The NSW Premier and Racing NSW say the promotion is in line with previous sporting and cultural use building's sails. Former chief executive of the Sydney Opera House, Michael Lynch says the horse racing promotion proposed for the sails of the Opera House is 'highly inappropriate'. Bill Hare discusses climate change report The UN's intergovernmental panel on climate change released a report today which paints an alarming picture of the impact of a 2 per cent increase in global temperatures as a result of climate change. It says urgent and unprecedented action is needed to keep the increase to one and a half degrees. Dr Bill Hare of the CEO of Climate Analytics discusses what it means. Alison Harcourt Alison Harcourt may not be a household name, but the 88-year-old statistics pioneer is somewhat of a celebrity in some parts of the maths world. Her work has helped measure poverty in Australia and played a key role in amending the Electoral Act, and the octogenarian is still going strong and tutoring the next generation of young students. Cable Beach It's one of the most popular images in Australian tourism, camel trains silhouetted against a setting sun on Broome's Cable Beach. But there's trouble brewing in the remote paradise, as the camels share the beach with growing numbers of tourists and four wheel drive vehicles.
How do you keep people safe from dog attacks?
The death of a toddler last month has reignited the debate about how to keep people safe from dogs. The RSPCA says training and education is the answer, but others want aggressive dogs banned.
 
Laura Tingle on the $4.5bn extra funding for Catholic and independent schools
Prime Minister Scott Morrison has announced $4.5 billion in extra funding for Catholic and independent schools.
 
Behind the lens of Parliament's prize photographer
This year, for the first time in history, the press gallery journalist of the year award went to a photographer, Alex Ellinghausen. He works for the Sydney Morning Herald and The Age, and while you may not know his name the chances are you'll recognise his work - capturing politicians at their best, their worst and their most vulnerable.
 
The battle for control of powerlifting in Australia
Parliament house isn't the only place where you'll find politics. Pretty much any organisation, no matter how big or small, will at some stage become captive to people jockeying for power. The sport of powerlifting in Australia is a case in point, with two local federations vying for control - and the athletes caught in the middle.
 
Roadies, a look at life on the road
Behind every world-conquering band is a road crew that transports them from gig to gig, ensures they look and sound amazing, and literally works around the clock to keep the show on the road. Music writer Stuart Coupe's latest book, Roadies – The Secret History of Australian Rock'n'Roll, is a fascinating look at the often hidden side of the music business.

7.30: September 20, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
31:53
How do you keep people safe from dog attacks? The death of a toddler last month has reignited the debate about how to keep people safe from dogs. The RSPCA says training and education is the answer, but others want aggressive dogs banned. Laura Tingle on the $4.5bn extra funding for Catholic and independent schools Prime Minister Scott Morrison has announced $4.5 billion in extra funding for Catholic and independent schools. Behind the lens of Parliament's prize photographer This year, for the first time in history, the press gallery journalist of the year award went to a photographer, Alex Ellinghausen. He works for the Sydney Morning Herald and The Age, and while you may not know his name the chances are you'll recognise his work - capturing politicians at their best, their worst and their most vulnerable. The battle for control of powerlifting in Australia Parliament house isn't the only place where you'll find politics. Pretty much any organisation, no matter how big or small, will at some stage become captive to people jockeying for power. The sport of powerlifting in Australia is a case in point, with two local federations vying for control - and the athletes caught in the middle. Roadies, a look at life on the road Behind every world-conquering band is a road crew that transports them from gig to gig, ensures they look and sound amazing, and literally works around the clock to keep the show on the road. Music writer Stuart Coupe's latest book, Roadies – The Secret History of Australian Rock'n'Roll, is a fascinating look at the often hidden side of the music business.
Authorities fear copy-cat tampering in fruit contamination disaster
Since the story strawberry tampering broke more than 100 reports of contaminated fruit have been made around the country, sparking fears of copy-cat tampering. Authorities are scrambling to manage this slow-moving disaster as they try to limit the damage to an industry worth almost half a billion dollars.
 
Why are female Liberal MPs quitting Federal politics?
A number of female Liberal MPs have spoken out against internal party dynamics, while also announcing they won’t recontest the next election. But Prime Minister Scott Morrison insisting there is not a behaviour problem in Canberra.
 
Christian Porter discusses strawberry tampering and sexism in politics
Federal Attorney General, Christian Porter, talks to 7.30 about news laws introduced to counter the growing strawberry tampering crisis, and whether the Liberal Party has a problem with women.
 
Marine archaeologists may have discovered the wreck of the Endeavour
Historian David Hunt explains why the discovery of Capt. James Cook's ship, HMS Endeavour, would be an important moment in Australia's history.
 
Meet Alec Knight, the first Australian male to join the New York City Ballet
Alec Knight was just 17 when he moved to New York after being offered a coveted apprenticeship with the New York City Ballet. That was five years ago. Now he's the first Australian male to be given a contract with the prestigious ballet company.

7.30: September 19, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
30:05
Authorities fear copy-cat tampering in fruit contamination disaster Since the story strawberry tampering broke more than 100 reports of contaminated fruit have been made around the country, sparking fears of copy-cat tampering. Authorities are scrambling to manage this slow-moving disaster as they try to limit the damage to an industry worth almost half a billion dollars. Why are female Liberal MPs quitting Federal politics? A number of female Liberal MPs have spoken out against internal party dynamics, while also announcing they won’t recontest the next election. But Prime Minister Scott Morrison insisting there is not a behaviour problem in Canberra. Christian Porter discusses strawberry tampering and sexism in politics Federal Attorney General, Christian Porter, talks to 7.30 about news laws introduced to counter the growing strawberry tampering crisis, and whether the Liberal Party has a problem with women. Marine archaeologists may have discovered the wreck of the Endeavour Historian David Hunt explains why the discovery of Capt. James Cook's ship, HMS Endeavour, would be an important moment in Australia's history. Meet Alec Knight, the first Australian male to join the New York City Ballet Alec Knight was just 17 when he moved to New York after being offered a coveted apprenticeship with the New York City Ballet. That was five years ago. Now he's the first Australian male to be given a contract with the prestigious ballet company.
Ten years on from the GFC are we heading for another crash?
This week marks a decade since the collapse of the US investment bank Lehman Brothers triggered the worst global financial crisis since the Great Depression. While much of the world fell into prolonged recession, Australia's economy narrowly avoided that fate but 10 years on, many individual Australians are still paying the price.
 
Phil Coorey reviews the Morrison government's first parliamentary week
The Morrison Governments' first parliamentary week has done little to settle the dust after the downfall of Malcolm Turnbull three weeks ago. The AFR's chief political correspondent, Phil Coorey looks at how it has performed.
 
Sydney light rail project won't break-even, NSW Cabinet told in 2012
Over time, and over budget, Sydney's floundering light rail project is wreaking havoc on businesses and commuters in the country's largest city. Leaked NSW cabinet documents point to a political culture where economic caution is thrown out the window in the rush to approve expensive and ultimately disruptive schemes.
 
Search on for Australia's next big diamond deposit
Of all the minerals dug out of the ground, diamonds have a special allure and Australia produces some of the most sought-after stones in the world. But the nation's sole operating diamond mine is on the verge of closure. That's led to a flurry of exploration to find a new diamond deposit.
 
Technology offering blind people the chance to borrow someone else's eyes
Imagine borrowing the eyes of someone on the other side of the world. That's what technology is now offering more than half a million Australians who are blind or vision impaired, via free, and paid, apps on their smart phones.

7.30: September 13, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
32:16
Ten years on from the GFC are we heading for another crash? This week marks a decade since the collapse of the US investment bank Lehman Brothers triggered the worst global financial crisis since the Great Depression. While much of the world fell into prolonged recession, Australia's economy narrowly avoided that fate but 10 years on, many individual Australians are still paying the price. Phil Coorey reviews the Morrison government's first parliamentary week The Morrison Governments' first parliamentary week has done little to settle the dust after the downfall of Malcolm Turnbull three weeks ago. The AFR's chief political correspondent, Phil Coorey looks at how it has performed. Sydney light rail project won't break-even, NSW Cabinet told in 2012 Over time, and over budget, Sydney's floundering light rail project is wreaking havoc on businesses and commuters in the country's largest city. Leaked NSW cabinet documents point to a political culture where economic caution is thrown out the window in the rush to approve expensive and ultimately disruptive schemes. Search on for Australia's next big diamond deposit Of all the minerals dug out of the ground, diamonds have a special allure and Australia produces some of the most sought-after stones in the world. But the nation's sole operating diamond mine is on the verge of closure. That's led to a flurry of exploration to find a new diamond deposit. Technology offering blind people the chance to borrow someone else's eyes Imagine borrowing the eyes of someone on the other side of the world. That's what technology is now offering more than half a million Australians who are blind or vision impaired, via free, and paid, apps on their smart phones.
Banned Chinese cameras are being used by the Australian Government
Security cameras made by Chinese surveillance companies are also being used at a series of classified facilities including an Adelaide Air Force base and a Canberra office block home to an annexe of the nation's intelligence agencies.
 
Lynette Dawson's niece, Renee Sims, and journalist Hedley Thomas discuss new search for missing woman
Renee Simms, niece of missing woman Lyn Dawson, and Hedley Thomas, the journalist behind the Teacher's Pet podcast, discuss today's news that police are digging at the former property of Lyn Dawson and her husband.
 
Can women change the political culture?
The treatment of women in politics has been a hot subject of debate in recent months with allegations of slut shaming, and during the Liberals' leadership turmoil, accusations of bullying and bad behaviour. The big question is, will anything really change?
 
Cerebral palsy treatment creating an international bond of friendship between two families
Last year we told the story about Max Shearman whose dad Michael carried the then six-year-old along the gruelling Kokoda track to raise money for a trial of technology called a TheraSuit. While the pair was on that mission, they built a relationship with a local Papua New Guinea family also searching for help with their daughter's cerebral palsy diagnosis. That family recently travelled to Melbourne for three weeks of intensive treatment.

7.30: September 12, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
29:01
Banned Chinese cameras are being used by the Australian Government Security cameras made by Chinese surveillance companies are also being used at a series of classified facilities including an Adelaide Air Force base and a Canberra office block home to an annexe of the nation's intelligence agencies. Lynette Dawson's niece, Renee Sims, and journalist Hedley Thomas discuss new search for missing woman Renee Simms, niece of missing woman Lyn Dawson, and Hedley Thomas, the journalist behind the Teacher's Pet podcast, discuss today's news that police are digging at the former property of Lyn Dawson and her husband. Can women change the political culture? The treatment of women in politics has been a hot subject of debate in recent months with allegations of slut shaming, and during the Liberals' leadership turmoil, accusations of bullying and bad behaviour. The big question is, will anything really change? Cerebral palsy treatment creating an international bond of friendship between two families Last year we told the story about Max Shearman whose dad Michael carried the then six-year-old along the gruelling Kokoda track to raise money for a trial of technology called a TheraSuit. While the pair was on that mission, they built a relationship with a local Papua New Guinea family also searching for help with their daughter's cerebral palsy diagnosis. That family recently travelled to Melbourne for three weeks of intensive treatment.
Australia and rental affordability 
Australian renters are paying through the roof. And it's hitting people in all income brackets. Low income earners are being squeezed by a shortage of public housing and middle to high income earners can't afford to buy houses so they're driving up rental prices and competing for the limited number of properties.
Peter Dutton 
Ashlynne McGhee explains what's happening in an explosive war of words which has erupted between Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton and his former border force chief Roman Quaedvlieg. Mr Quaedvlieg claims he was personally lobbied by Mr Dutton's staff to grant a visa to an Italian nanny. Mr Dutton says those claims are fabricated.
John Millman's US Open 
Today Australians learned that Queensland tennis pro John Millman is as classy in defeat as he is in victory. Earlier this week, the 29-year-old shocked the tennis word by knocking Roger Federer out of the US Open but today he couldn't face down another formidable opponent the tournament favourite Novak Djokovic.
James Ricketson 
The family of James Ricketson, an Australian filmmaker imprisoned in Cambodia for 'spying', is pleading for mercy. Ricketson has been in jail since the middle of 2017 and is now now applying to the Cambodian King for clemency
Natasha Walsh wins Whiteley scholarship
In 1959, a little-known 20-year-old artist named Brett Whiteley was awarded a scholarship to study and paint in Europe. It helped launch him onto the world stage. In memory of her son, the late Beryl Whiteley allocated funds for an annual scholarship to give other young Australian artists the same opportunity - and this year's winner is Natasha Walsh.

7.30: Australia and Rental Affordability/Peter Dutton/John Millman's US Open/James Ricketsons/Natasha Walsh's Victory

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
30:11
Australia and rental affordability Australian renters are paying through the roof. And it's hitting people in all income brackets. Low income earners are being squeezed by a shortage of public housing and middle to high income earners can't afford to buy houses so they're driving up rental prices and competing for the limited number of properties. Peter Dutton Ashlynne McGhee explains what's happening in an explosive war of words which has erupted between Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton and his former border force chief Roman Quaedvlieg. Mr Quaedvlieg claims he was personally lobbied by Mr Dutton's staff to grant a visa to an Italian nanny. Mr Dutton says those claims are fabricated. John Millman's US Open Today Australians learned that Queensland tennis pro John Millman is as classy in defeat as he is in victory. Earlier this week, the 29-year-old shocked the tennis word by knocking Roger Federer out of the US Open but today he couldn't face down another formidable opponent the tournament favourite Novak Djokovic. James Ricketson The family of James Ricketson, an Australian filmmaker imprisoned in Cambodia for 'spying', is pleading for mercy. Ricketson has been in jail since the middle of 2017 and is now now applying to the Cambodian King for clemency Natasha Walsh wins Whiteley scholarship In 1959, a little-known 20-year-old artist named Brett Whiteley was awarded a scholarship to study and paint in Europe. It helped launch him onto the world stage. In memory of her son, the late Beryl Whiteley allocated funds for an annual scholarship to give other young Australian artists the same opportunity - and this year's winner is Natasha Walsh.
Jenny Brockie takes a look at chronic fatigue syndrome, what symptoms it has, and how people with the condition have managed it.
At 20 years old, Adele Clydesdale had just climbed Mount Kilimanjaro; she was starting her second year of university and playing in the Victorian Netball League.
So when she got glandular fever, she didn’t think much of it. She knew plenty of people who’d had it in high school and they always recovered quickly.
But even when tests results revealed the glandular fever was out of her system, Adele was still unwell and her symptoms were getting worse. She was increasingly fatigued, couldn’t string sentences together and had extreme body pain.
At six months, it was confirmed Adele had chronic fatigue syndrome, a diagnosis she found quite confronting.
Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is estimated to affect between 0.2-2 per cent of the population in Australia yet very little is known about this condition.
Otherwise known as Myalgic Encephalomyelitis or ME, it is an illness characterised by profound fatigue, not relieved by sleep or rest and worsened with activity.
Patients will commonly experience muscle and joint pain, impaired memory and concentration and gastrointestinal disorders. However, the most defining indicator of CFS is Post Exertional Malaise (PEM) - when a certain level of cognitive or physical exertion will exacerbate a patient’s symptoms.
There are currently no proven treatments for CFS which means many are left without answers. Ketra Wooding has been unwell for eight years and with such severe symptoms, she has been living in a nursing home for five of those years.

Insight: Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

News and current affairs, Intercultural understanding

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs, Intercultural understanding
51:56
Jenny Brockie takes a look at chronic fatigue syndrome, what symptoms it has, and how people with the condition have managed it. At 20 years old, Adele Clydesdale had just climbed Mount Kilimanjaro; she was starting her second year of university and playing in the Victorian Netball League. So when she got glandular fever, she didn’t think much of it. She knew plenty of people who’d had it in high school and they always recovered quickly. But even when tests results revealed the glandular fever was out of her system, Adele was still unwell and her symptoms were getting worse. She was increasingly fatigued, couldn’t string sentences together and had extreme body pain. At six months, it was confirmed Adele had chronic fatigue syndrome, a diagnosis she found quite confronting. Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is estimated to affect between 0.2-2 per cent of the population in Australia yet very little is known about this condition. Otherwise known as Myalgic Encephalomyelitis or ME, it is an illness characterised by profound fatigue, not relieved by sleep or rest and worsened with activity. Patients will commonly experience muscle and joint pain, impaired memory and concentration and gastrointestinal disorders. However, the most defining indicator of CFS is Post Exertional Malaise (PEM) - when a certain level of cognitive or physical exertion will exacerbate a patient’s symptoms. There are currently no proven treatments for CFS which means many are left without answers. Ketra Wooding has been unwell for eight years and with such severe symptoms, she has been living in a nursing home for five of those years.
The man who broke Watergate talks about Donald Trump
Donald Trump may have popularised the term 'fake news', but the wild nature of his presidency has also spawned an extraordinary series of insider accounts of his chaotic White House. The latest and most substantial of these is 'Fear' by veteran Washington reporter Bob Woodward.
Young women and injuries
The introduction of an AFL women's competition, the rise of the Matildas, and the increasing popularity of women's cricket all reflect a huge increase in the popularity of women's team sport. But with this surge has come a significant increase in serious knee injuries. Women are up to ten times more likely to rupture their anterior cruciate ligament than men, and Australia has the highest rate of knee reconstructions in the world.
Energy distributors push for a cap on solar power
More than six solar panels are installed across Australia every minute of every day as people try to tackle rising power prices. But the industry that owns Australia's poles and wires says all that power from the sun is a problem and it could destabilise the electricity grid. The solar industry disagrees, and it's preparing for a fight with the power networks.
Asian elephants under threat 
The Asian elephant is one of the world's most majestic animals. But now these gentle giants face a threat that could wipe them out completely … poachers who want their skin.

7.30: October 15, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
29:08
The man who broke Watergate talks about Donald Trump Donald Trump may have popularised the term 'fake news', but the wild nature of his presidency has also spawned an extraordinary series of insider accounts of his chaotic White House. The latest and most substantial of these is 'Fear' by veteran Washington reporter Bob Woodward. Young women and injuries The introduction of an AFL women's competition, the rise of the Matildas, and the increasing popularity of women's cricket all reflect a huge increase in the popularity of women's team sport. But with this surge has come a significant increase in serious knee injuries. Women are up to ten times more likely to rupture their anterior cruciate ligament than men, and Australia has the highest rate of knee reconstructions in the world. Energy distributors push for a cap on solar power More than six solar panels are installed across Australia every minute of every day as people try to tackle rising power prices. But the industry that owns Australia's poles and wires says all that power from the sun is a problem and it could destabilise the electricity grid. The solar industry disagrees, and it's preparing for a fight with the power networks. Asian elephants under threat The Asian elephant is one of the world's most majestic animals. But now these gentle giants face a threat that could wipe them out completely … poachers who want their skin.
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