60 Minutes

60 Minutes

Vile Trade/Royal Fairytale/Baker's Delight
Nine  |  April 15, 2018
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Vile Trade
Tom Steinfort tracks Australia's drug problem back to cartel country, where the AFP has posted their first full-time operative.

Royal Fairytale
Tara Brown is on the ground in London ahead of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle's big day. While the world if buzzing with royal wedding fever - not everyone is so excited. Republican and feminist Germaine Greer predicts the marriage won't last.

Baker's Delight
Depending on your age, Simon Baker is either that Aussie bloke from the TV show The Mentalist or, if you're older, that sassy kid who played a young copper in the 90s soapie, E-Street. In reality Baker is one of our most successful and in-demand international actors. He has his own star on the Hollywood walk of fame and was once voted the sexiest man on television. Now he has come home to add "director" to his resume\0x0301. In a revealing interview with Allison Langdon, Baker explains that his first feature film is an enormous test of his skill, bringing author Tim Winton's acclaimed novel Breath to the big screen.

Vile Trade
Tom Steinfort tracks Australia's drug problem back to cartel country, where the AFP has posted their first full-time operative.

Royal Fairytale
Tara Brown is on the ground in London ahead of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle's big day. While the world if buzzing with royal wedding fever - not everyone is so excited. Republican and feminist Germaine Greer predicts the marriage won't last.

Baker's Delight
Depending on your age, Simon Baker is either that Aussie bloke from the TV show The Mentalist or, if you're older, that sassy kid who played a young copper in the 90s soapie, E-Street. In reality Baker is one of our most successful and in-demand international actors. He has his own star on the Hollywood walk of fame and was once voted the sexiest man on television. Now he has come home to add "director" to his resume\0x0301. In a revealing interview with Allison Langdon, Baker explains that his first feature film is an enormous test of his skill, bringing author Tim Winton's acclaimed novel Breath to the big screen.

The big step
Six-year-old Isabella Lombardo is a real chatterbox. Smart and beautiful, she lights up any room. But she has lived her short life debilitated by cerebral palsy. It’s a tough disorder, and when it was diagnosed her mum and dad vowed to do anything and everything they could to help their precious daughter. For four years Libby and Joseph Lombardo searched the world and spent all their savings, but eventually found a radical new stem-cell treatment in Mexico. The prize it offered was the hope Isabella might walk for the first time. Then they faced the most difficult decision of all: should they put their faith – and their daughter’s life – in the hands of unknown doctors and untested science?
ISIS bride, Aussie baby
It would be easy to give Islam Mitat the coldest of shoulders, to ignore her despair and say we couldn’t care less about her. After all she was an ISIS bride, married to a British jihadi, and living at the front line of the war in Syria. And when, not surprisingly, her husband was killed in battle, she married an Australian ISIS fighter and had his baby. He too paid the ultimate price for his beliefs, leaving Islam with no choice but to make a daring and dangerous escape. Now, in an exclusive 60 MINUTES interview conducted in a secret North African location, she tells Tara Brown she was tricked into going to Syria in the first place. It’s a revelation that raises serious questions. Should we believe her? And what should become of this ISIS bride and her Aussie baby?
The long paddock
Unless you’ve had your head stuck in the non-existent clouds, you’d know large tracts of eastern Australia are in the iron grip of the nastiest drought in 50 years. The experts say if there isn’t rain soon it will become the worst drought since records were first kept. But while there has been a flood of stories about desperation and despair, Charles Wooley reckons it’s just as important to highlight the incredible resilience of the people on the land, despite these hardest of times. Way out beyond Tamworth in country New South Wales he met the wonderful Hourigan family, drovers who are moving 900 head of cattle along what is known as “the long paddock”.

60 Minutes: The Big Step/ ISIS Bride/ The Long Paddock

News and current affairs

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs
50:10
The big step Six-year-old Isabella Lombardo is a real chatterbox. Smart and beautiful, she lights up any room. But she has lived her short life debilitated by cerebral palsy. It’s a tough disorder, and when it was diagnosed her mum and dad vowed to do anything and everything they could to help their precious daughter. For four years Libby and Joseph Lombardo searched the world and spent all their savings, but eventually found a radical new stem-cell treatment in Mexico. The prize it offered was the hope Isabella might walk for the first time. Then they faced the most difficult decision of all: should they put their faith – and their daughter’s life – in the hands of unknown doctors and untested science? ISIS bride, Aussie baby It would be easy to give Islam Mitat the coldest of shoulders, to ignore her despair and say we couldn’t care less about her. After all she was an ISIS bride, married to a British jihadi, and living at the front line of the war in Syria. And when, not surprisingly, her husband was killed in battle, she married an Australian ISIS fighter and had his baby. He too paid the ultimate price for his beliefs, leaving Islam with no choice but to make a daring and dangerous escape. Now, in an exclusive 60 MINUTES interview conducted in a secret North African location, she tells Tara Brown she was tricked into going to Syria in the first place. It’s a revelation that raises serious questions. Should we believe her? And what should become of this ISIS bride and her Aussie baby? The long paddock Unless you’ve had your head stuck in the non-existent clouds, you’d know large tracts of eastern Australia are in the iron grip of the nastiest drought in 50 years. The experts say if there isn’t rain soon it will become the worst drought since records were first kept. But while there has been a flood of stories about desperation and despair, Charles Wooley reckons it’s just as important to highlight the incredible resilience of the people on the land, despite these hardest of times. Way out beyond Tamworth in country New South Wales he met the wonderful Hourigan family, drovers who are moving 900 head of cattle along what is known as “the long paddock”.
Gamble of life
Soon after meeting and falling in love, Andrew and Olivia Densley agreed they both adored kids and wanted a large family. They got married and got on with their dream. But after having their fourth child they received terrible news. Their third child, a son, had a genetic immune deficiency disease which looked likely to kill him. Just when all seemed lost though, he was saved by a long-shot miracle. His little brother, the couple’s fourth child, was a match as a bone marrow donor. But as Tom Steinfort reports, at this point the story gets even more complicated. While Andrew and Olivia knew the substantial risks of having more children, it didn’t stop them. Olivia fell pregnant with a fifth child who was also born with the usually fatal disease. But having rolled the dice and lost, the couple refused to give up. It has taken several years and a hundred thousand dollars, but they’ve managed to engineer another extraordinary solution.
A magpie called Penguin
Somewhere, flying around the northern beaches of Sydney, is a magpie called Penguin who often thinks she’s a human. And if that’s not incredible enough, this amazing bird has another claim to fame – she’s a lifesaver. Penguin taught Sam Bloom, a mother of three, how to live again after she fell from a balcony, broke her back and became a paraplegic. It’s a truly inspiring tale that not surprisingly will also soon be a Hollywood movie

60 Minutes: Gamble of Life/A Magpie Called Penguin

News and current affairs

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs
48:40
Gamble of life Soon after meeting and falling in love, Andrew and Olivia Densley agreed they both adored kids and wanted a large family. They got married and got on with their dream. But after having their fourth child they received terrible news. Their third child, a son, had a genetic immune deficiency disease which looked likely to kill him. Just when all seemed lost though, he was saved by a long-shot miracle. His little brother, the couple’s fourth child, was a match as a bone marrow donor. But as Tom Steinfort reports, at this point the story gets even more complicated. While Andrew and Olivia knew the substantial risks of having more children, it didn’t stop them. Olivia fell pregnant with a fifth child who was also born with the usually fatal disease. But having rolled the dice and lost, the couple refused to give up. It has taken several years and a hundred thousand dollars, but they’ve managed to engineer another extraordinary solution. A magpie called Penguin Somewhere, flying around the northern beaches of Sydney, is a magpie called Penguin who often thinks she’s a human. And if that’s not incredible enough, this amazing bird has another claim to fame – she’s a lifesaver. Penguin taught Sam Bloom, a mother of three, how to live again after she fell from a balcony, broke her back and became a paraplegic. It’s a truly inspiring tale that not surprisingly will also soon be a Hollywood movie
The China Syndrome
It’s no secret that Australia’s relationship with China is as complicated as it is fragile. On the one hand, China is the key to our economic prosperity, so if we want to be rich we need to embrace the Chinese. On the other hand, there’s no question we have a fear of China’s expanding influence, and we don’t want them getting too close. Which is why what is happening in the South Pacific is causing growing concern. Somewhat arrogantly, Australia has always considered it our “patch of paradise” to protect and nurture. But now the Chinese are moving in and splashing their cash in places like Fiji and Vanuatu. So what’s next? Tom Steinfort investigates claims the Chinese may ultimately be planning to build military bases right on our doorstep.
Fake News
For millions of tourists visiting Australia the boomerang and the didgeridoo are iconic and highly sought after symbols of our indigenous culture. But unbelievably, most didgeridoos and boomerangs are now made in Indonesia, in Bali specifically, not here in Australia. It’s not because there’s a thriving expatriate Aboriginal community living up there, it’s all about money. Indonesian workers can churn out cheap copies of our artefacts by the shipload. And that’s very attractive for the businesses involved, which are happy to exploit or disrespect 40,000 years of culture in the pursuit of cashing in on gullible tourists.
Taken - Update
It is one of the most bizarre crimes 60 Minutes has ever encountered: the abduction last July of 20-year-old glamour model Chloe Ayling. She says she was snatched off a street in Milan and kept hostage in a remote Italian farmhouse while her kidnappers arranged to auction her off as a sex slave to the highest bidder. Chloe’s escape from this terrifying ordeal was so extraordinary that many accused her of making the whole story up – an elaborate publicity stunt for fame and fortune. Earlier this week a judge in an Italian court had his say, and as Liam Bartlett reports, the intrigue continues.

60 Minutes: China Syndrome/Fake News/Taken-Update

News and current affairs

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs
43:52
The China Syndrome It’s no secret that Australia’s relationship with China is as complicated as it is fragile. On the one hand, China is the key to our economic prosperity, so if we want to be rich we need to embrace the Chinese. On the other hand, there’s no question we have a fear of China’s expanding influence, and we don’t want them getting too close. Which is why what is happening in the South Pacific is causing growing concern. Somewhat arrogantly, Australia has always considered it our “patch of paradise” to protect and nurture. But now the Chinese are moving in and splashing their cash in places like Fiji and Vanuatu. So what’s next? Tom Steinfort investigates claims the Chinese may ultimately be planning to build military bases right on our doorstep. Fake News For millions of tourists visiting Australia the boomerang and the didgeridoo are iconic and highly sought after symbols of our indigenous culture. But unbelievably, most didgeridoos and boomerangs are now made in Indonesia, in Bali specifically, not here in Australia. It’s not because there’s a thriving expatriate Aboriginal community living up there, it’s all about money. Indonesian workers can churn out cheap copies of our artefacts by the shipload. And that’s very attractive for the businesses involved, which are happy to exploit or disrespect 40,000 years of culture in the pursuit of cashing in on gullible tourists. Taken - Update It is one of the most bizarre crimes 60 Minutes has ever encountered: the abduction last July of 20-year-old glamour model Chloe Ayling. She says she was snatched off a street in Milan and kept hostage in a remote Italian farmhouse while her kidnappers arranged to auction her off as a sex slave to the highest bidder. Chloe’s escape from this terrifying ordeal was so extraordinary that many accused her of making the whole story up – an elaborate publicity stunt for fame and fortune. Earlier this week a judge in an Italian court had his say, and as Liam Bartlett reports, the intrigue continues.
F for Fail
To the outside world they are highly respected, prestigious institutions committed to supporting young Australians as they embark on their journey through tertiary education. But behind the closed doors of many university residential colleges lurks a very different story. In March, Allison Langdon exposed disgusting initiation rituals, out-of-control drunken behaviour and most disturbingly, sexual assaults at colleges around the country. Following the broadcast of our story, “D for Disgrace” 60 Minutes was contacted by many more college residents, sick of the toxic culture which they say is fostered by a hierarchy of people who should know better. Now many students want change and they’re determined to fight for it. Their stories sent to 60 Minutes, along with supporting video and photographic evidence, will shock Australia. As one former college resident warns parents, “Do not send your children to college, because you have no control over what happens, and the atmosphere of secrecy stops you having any knowledge of what your child is going through.” Another tells Allison Langdon that when she raised an allegation of sexual assault with the management of her residential college she was told it was “all part of growing up”.
Wings over the world
To get the most out of their lives together, Glenn Singleman and Heather Swan go to extraordinary lengths. Or heights, to be more precise. Then, dressed in wingsuits, the couple jump out of planes and fly. They’ve soared over some amazing locations around the world and set multiple adventure records doing it. But there’s one place no one has ever flown in a wingsuit: Antarctica. So when Glenn and Heather told Liz Hayes of their dream to fly over the frozen continent, she thought it was mission impossible.

60 Minutes: F for Fail/Wings over the world

News and current affairs

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs
38:43
F for Fail To the outside world they are highly respected, prestigious institutions committed to supporting young Australians as they embark on their journey through tertiary education. But behind the closed doors of many university residential colleges lurks a very different story. In March, Allison Langdon exposed disgusting initiation rituals, out-of-control drunken behaviour and most disturbingly, sexual assaults at colleges around the country. Following the broadcast of our story, “D for Disgrace” 60 Minutes was contacted by many more college residents, sick of the toxic culture which they say is fostered by a hierarchy of people who should know better. Now many students want change and they’re determined to fight for it. Their stories sent to 60 Minutes, along with supporting video and photographic evidence, will shock Australia. As one former college resident warns parents, “Do not send your children to college, because you have no control over what happens, and the atmosphere of secrecy stops you having any knowledge of what your child is going through.” Another tells Allison Langdon that when she raised an allegation of sexual assault with the management of her residential college she was told it was “all part of growing up”. Wings over the world To get the most out of their lives together, Glenn Singleman and Heather Swan go to extraordinary lengths. Or heights, to be more precise. Then, dressed in wingsuits, the couple jump out of planes and fly. They’ve soared over some amazing locations around the world and set multiple adventure records doing it. But there’s one place no one has ever flown in a wingsuit: Antarctica. So when Glenn and Heather told Liz Hayes of their dream to fly over the frozen continent, she thought it was mission impossible.
Major parties clash over discrimination bill
The second last day of federal parliament for the year and the level of frenzy rose considerably. Asylum seekers, energy and the economy were all being debated, but it was the issue of discrimination against gay students attending religious schools, that had the government and opposition in fiercest combat.

Ita Buttrose gives advice to her younger self
When Ita Buttrose started Cleo magazine in 1972, it was the first time a women's publication was frank about sexuality and it went on to become a huge success. That was just the beginning for a woman who's paved the way for women in journalism ever since. Now Ita Buttrose shares her wisdom in our 'advice to my younger self' series.

Chris Dawson 
Renee Simms, the niece of Lynette Dawson, talks about the arrest of Chris Murphy, who is expected to be charged with the murder of his wife 36 years ago.
 
Reverse mortgages leaving the elderly high and dry
Reverse mortgages are touted as a way to unlock equity in the family home by borrowing against the asset without needing to make repayments until the house is sold or the owner moves out or dies. But a number of banks, including Australia's biggest lender the Commonwealth Bank, are now getting out of the reverse mortgage market, in the face of criticism from the peak financial regulator, ASIC.
Closing Europe's biggest steel works
In the south of Italy, a major corruption trial is underway that is pitting a local community against Europe's biggest steelworks, the Ilva plant in Taranto. The pollution from the plant is so bad it has been blamed in official government reports for the deaths of almost 400 local residents. The former owners of the company have been accused of crimes against public safety.

7.30: December 5, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
30:36
Major parties clash over discrimination bill The second last day of federal parliament for the year and the level of frenzy rose considerably. Asylum seekers, energy and the economy were all being debated, but it was the issue of discrimination against gay students attending religious schools, that had the government and opposition in fiercest combat. Ita Buttrose gives advice to her younger self When Ita Buttrose started Cleo magazine in 1972, it was the first time a women's publication was frank about sexuality and it went on to become a huge success. That was just the beginning for a woman who's paved the way for women in journalism ever since. Now Ita Buttrose shares her wisdom in our 'advice to my younger self' series. Chris Dawson Renee Simms, the niece of Lynette Dawson, talks about the arrest of Chris Murphy, who is expected to be charged with the murder of his wife 36 years ago. Reverse mortgages leaving the elderly high and dry Reverse mortgages are touted as a way to unlock equity in the family home by borrowing against the asset without needing to make repayments until the house is sold or the owner moves out or dies. But a number of banks, including Australia's biggest lender the Commonwealth Bank, are now getting out of the reverse mortgage market, in the face of criticism from the peak financial regulator, ASIC. Closing Europe's biggest steel works In the south of Italy, a major corruption trial is underway that is pitting a local community against Europe's biggest steelworks, the Ilva plant in Taranto. The pollution from the plant is so bad it has been blamed in official government reports for the deaths of almost 400 local residents. The former owners of the company have been accused of crimes against public safety.
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