60 Minutes

60 Minutes

Under The Influence/Right Or Wrong/Stevie And Chrissie/Question Time
Nine  |  August 13, 2017
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Under The Influence
If you think Facebook and Instagram are only about keeping in touch with family and friends, or being wooed and wowed by cute animal pictures, then it's time to think again. The two giants of social media are vehicles to potentially make bucketloads of money, and an increasing number of clever Australians are cashing in on the billions on offer. As Peter Stefanovic discovers, it all has to do with accumulating followers. The more you have, the greater the influence you wield, and the more attractive you become to businesses willing to pay you huge dollars to promote their products. It's not quite making money for nothing, but pretty close.

Right Or Wrong
Are we becoming too clever for our own good? Medical science has developed a simple blood test which can tell prospective mothers early in their pregnancies if their babies will have Down syndrome. The test is 99 percent accurate and doctors are lobbying to make it free for all Australian women who want to take it. However, nine out of 10 mums who receive a positive result are already choosing to terminate their pregnancies. It's a statistic that horrifies many because, if it continues, it may eliminate a beautiful and special part of our community.

Stevie And Chrissie
In rock 'n' roll it would be difficult to find two more successful or enduring women than Stevie Nicks and Chrissie Hynde. It'd be even harder to find two more different rock legends. For the uninitiated, Stevie rose to fame as the mystical frontwoman of the supergroup Fleetwood Mac, while Chrissie was the feisty lead singer of the Pretenders. Now, to the surprise of many, including themselves, they have teamed up and hit the road. In a very short time, Stevie and Chrissie have not only proven that opposites really do attract, but as they told Liz Hayes, they've also shown the world how wonderful it is to be 60-something-year-old women making a lot of noise.

Question Time
Unlike his many colleagues at Nine, and millions of television viewers in lounge rooms around the country, there were probably quite a few MPs who breathed a sigh of relief when Laurie Oakes announced his retirement. After all, for politicians, the mere thought of being the subject of an Oakes story on the nightly news was enough to raise a cold sweat. For more than half a century Laurie has reported - without fear or favour - the biggest scoops in federal Parliament. Along the way he became the finest political journalist this country has produced. Before he retires his famous clipboard for good, longtime friend Charles Wooley thought he'd find out if Laurie can answer questions as well as he can ask them.

Under The Influence
If you think Facebook and Instagram are only about keeping in touch with family and friends, or being wooed and wowed by cute animal pictures, then it's time to think again. The two giants of social media are vehicles to potentially make bucketloads of money, and an increasing number of clever Australians are cashing in on the billions on offer. As Peter Stefanovic discovers, it all has to do with accumulating followers. The more you have, the greater the influence you wield, and the more attractive you become to businesses willing to pay you huge dollars to promote their products. It's not quite making money for nothing, but pretty close.

Right Or Wrong
Are we becoming too clever for our own good? Medical science has developed a simple blood test which can tell prospective mothers early in their pregnancies if their babies will have Down syndrome. The test is 99 percent accurate and doctors are lobbying to make it free for all Australian women who want to take it. However, nine out of 10 mums who receive a positive result are already choosing to terminate their pregnancies. It's a statistic that horrifies many because, if it continues, it may eliminate a beautiful and special part of our community.

Stevie And Chrissie
In rock 'n' roll it would be difficult to find two more successful or enduring women than Stevie Nicks and Chrissie Hynde. It'd be even harder to find two more different rock legends. For the uninitiated, Stevie rose to fame as the mystical frontwoman of the supergroup Fleetwood Mac, while Chrissie was the feisty lead singer of the Pretenders. Now, to the surprise of many, including themselves, they have teamed up and hit the road. In a very short time, Stevie and Chrissie have not only proven that opposites really do attract, but as they told Liz Hayes, they've also shown the world how wonderful it is to be 60-something-year-old women making a lot of noise.

Question Time
Unlike his many colleagues at Nine, and millions of television viewers in lounge rooms around the country, there were probably quite a few MPs who breathed a sigh of relief when Laurie Oakes announced his retirement. After all, for politicians, the mere thought of being the subject of an Oakes story on the nightly news was enough to raise a cold sweat. For more than half a century Laurie has reported - without fear or favour - the biggest scoops in federal Parliament. Along the way he became the finest political journalist this country has produced. Before he retires his famous clipboard for good, longtime friend Charles Wooley thought he'd find out if Laurie can answer questions as well as he can ask them.

The big step
Six-year-old Isabella Lombardo is a real chatterbox. Smart and beautiful, she lights up any room. But she has lived her short life debilitated by cerebral palsy. It’s a tough disorder, and when it was diagnosed her mum and dad vowed to do anything and everything they could to help their precious daughter. For four years Libby and Joseph Lombardo searched the world and spent all their savings, but eventually found a radical new stem-cell treatment in Mexico. The prize it offered was the hope Isabella might walk for the first time. Then they faced the most difficult decision of all: should they put their faith – and their daughter’s life – in the hands of unknown doctors and untested science?
ISIS bride, Aussie baby
It would be easy to give Islam Mitat the coldest of shoulders, to ignore her despair and say we couldn’t care less about her. After all she was an ISIS bride, married to a British jihadi, and living at the front line of the war in Syria. And when, not surprisingly, her husband was killed in battle, she married an Australian ISIS fighter and had his baby. He too paid the ultimate price for his beliefs, leaving Islam with no choice but to make a daring and dangerous escape. Now, in an exclusive 60 MINUTES interview conducted in a secret North African location, she tells Tara Brown she was tricked into going to Syria in the first place. It’s a revelation that raises serious questions. Should we believe her? And what should become of this ISIS bride and her Aussie baby?
The long paddock
Unless you’ve had your head stuck in the non-existent clouds, you’d know large tracts of eastern Australia are in the iron grip of the nastiest drought in 50 years. The experts say if there isn’t rain soon it will become the worst drought since records were first kept. But while there has been a flood of stories about desperation and despair, Charles Wooley reckons it’s just as important to highlight the incredible resilience of the people on the land, despite these hardest of times. Way out beyond Tamworth in country New South Wales he met the wonderful Hourigan family, drovers who are moving 900 head of cattle along what is known as “the long paddock”.

60 Minutes: The Big Step/ ISIS Bride/ The Long Paddock

News and current affairs

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs
50:10
The big step Six-year-old Isabella Lombardo is a real chatterbox. Smart and beautiful, she lights up any room. But she has lived her short life debilitated by cerebral palsy. It’s a tough disorder, and when it was diagnosed her mum and dad vowed to do anything and everything they could to help their precious daughter. For four years Libby and Joseph Lombardo searched the world and spent all their savings, but eventually found a radical new stem-cell treatment in Mexico. The prize it offered was the hope Isabella might walk for the first time. Then they faced the most difficult decision of all: should they put their faith – and their daughter’s life – in the hands of unknown doctors and untested science? ISIS bride, Aussie baby It would be easy to give Islam Mitat the coldest of shoulders, to ignore her despair and say we couldn’t care less about her. After all she was an ISIS bride, married to a British jihadi, and living at the front line of the war in Syria. And when, not surprisingly, her husband was killed in battle, she married an Australian ISIS fighter and had his baby. He too paid the ultimate price for his beliefs, leaving Islam with no choice but to make a daring and dangerous escape. Now, in an exclusive 60 MINUTES interview conducted in a secret North African location, she tells Tara Brown she was tricked into going to Syria in the first place. It’s a revelation that raises serious questions. Should we believe her? And what should become of this ISIS bride and her Aussie baby? The long paddock Unless you’ve had your head stuck in the non-existent clouds, you’d know large tracts of eastern Australia are in the iron grip of the nastiest drought in 50 years. The experts say if there isn’t rain soon it will become the worst drought since records were first kept. But while there has been a flood of stories about desperation and despair, Charles Wooley reckons it’s just as important to highlight the incredible resilience of the people on the land, despite these hardest of times. Way out beyond Tamworth in country New South Wales he met the wonderful Hourigan family, drovers who are moving 900 head of cattle along what is known as “the long paddock”.
Gamble of life
Soon after meeting and falling in love, Andrew and Olivia Densley agreed they both adored kids and wanted a large family. They got married and got on with their dream. But after having their fourth child they received terrible news. Their third child, a son, had a genetic immune deficiency disease which looked likely to kill him. Just when all seemed lost though, he was saved by a long-shot miracle. His little brother, the couple’s fourth child, was a match as a bone marrow donor. But as Tom Steinfort reports, at this point the story gets even more complicated. While Andrew and Olivia knew the substantial risks of having more children, it didn’t stop them. Olivia fell pregnant with a fifth child who was also born with the usually fatal disease. But having rolled the dice and lost, the couple refused to give up. It has taken several years and a hundred thousand dollars, but they’ve managed to engineer another extraordinary solution.
A magpie called Penguin
Somewhere, flying around the northern beaches of Sydney, is a magpie called Penguin who often thinks she’s a human. And if that’s not incredible enough, this amazing bird has another claim to fame – she’s a lifesaver. Penguin taught Sam Bloom, a mother of three, how to live again after she fell from a balcony, broke her back and became a paraplegic. It’s a truly inspiring tale that not surprisingly will also soon be a Hollywood movie

60 Minutes: Gamble of Life/A Magpie Called Penguin

News and current affairs

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs
48:40
Gamble of life Soon after meeting and falling in love, Andrew and Olivia Densley agreed they both adored kids and wanted a large family. They got married and got on with their dream. But after having their fourth child they received terrible news. Their third child, a son, had a genetic immune deficiency disease which looked likely to kill him. Just when all seemed lost though, he was saved by a long-shot miracle. His little brother, the couple’s fourth child, was a match as a bone marrow donor. But as Tom Steinfort reports, at this point the story gets even more complicated. While Andrew and Olivia knew the substantial risks of having more children, it didn’t stop them. Olivia fell pregnant with a fifth child who was also born with the usually fatal disease. But having rolled the dice and lost, the couple refused to give up. It has taken several years and a hundred thousand dollars, but they’ve managed to engineer another extraordinary solution. A magpie called Penguin Somewhere, flying around the northern beaches of Sydney, is a magpie called Penguin who often thinks she’s a human. And if that’s not incredible enough, this amazing bird has another claim to fame – she’s a lifesaver. Penguin taught Sam Bloom, a mother of three, how to live again after she fell from a balcony, broke her back and became a paraplegic. It’s a truly inspiring tale that not surprisingly will also soon be a Hollywood movie
The China Syndrome
It’s no secret that Australia’s relationship with China is as complicated as it is fragile. On the one hand, China is the key to our economic prosperity, so if we want to be rich we need to embrace the Chinese. On the other hand, there’s no question we have a fear of China’s expanding influence, and we don’t want them getting too close. Which is why what is happening in the South Pacific is causing growing concern. Somewhat arrogantly, Australia has always considered it our “patch of paradise” to protect and nurture. But now the Chinese are moving in and splashing their cash in places like Fiji and Vanuatu. So what’s next? Tom Steinfort investigates claims the Chinese may ultimately be planning to build military bases right on our doorstep.
Fake News
For millions of tourists visiting Australia the boomerang and the didgeridoo are iconic and highly sought after symbols of our indigenous culture. But unbelievably, most didgeridoos and boomerangs are now made in Indonesia, in Bali specifically, not here in Australia. It’s not because there’s a thriving expatriate Aboriginal community living up there, it’s all about money. Indonesian workers can churn out cheap copies of our artefacts by the shipload. And that’s very attractive for the businesses involved, which are happy to exploit or disrespect 40,000 years of culture in the pursuit of cashing in on gullible tourists.
Taken - Update
It is one of the most bizarre crimes 60 Minutes has ever encountered: the abduction last July of 20-year-old glamour model Chloe Ayling. She says she was snatched off a street in Milan and kept hostage in a remote Italian farmhouse while her kidnappers arranged to auction her off as a sex slave to the highest bidder. Chloe’s escape from this terrifying ordeal was so extraordinary that many accused her of making the whole story up – an elaborate publicity stunt for fame and fortune. Earlier this week a judge in an Italian court had his say, and as Liam Bartlett reports, the intrigue continues.

60 Minutes: China Syndrome/Fake News/Taken-Update

News and current affairs

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs
43:52
The China Syndrome It’s no secret that Australia’s relationship with China is as complicated as it is fragile. On the one hand, China is the key to our economic prosperity, so if we want to be rich we need to embrace the Chinese. On the other hand, there’s no question we have a fear of China’s expanding influence, and we don’t want them getting too close. Which is why what is happening in the South Pacific is causing growing concern. Somewhat arrogantly, Australia has always considered it our “patch of paradise” to protect and nurture. But now the Chinese are moving in and splashing their cash in places like Fiji and Vanuatu. So what’s next? Tom Steinfort investigates claims the Chinese may ultimately be planning to build military bases right on our doorstep. Fake News For millions of tourists visiting Australia the boomerang and the didgeridoo are iconic and highly sought after symbols of our indigenous culture. But unbelievably, most didgeridoos and boomerangs are now made in Indonesia, in Bali specifically, not here in Australia. It’s not because there’s a thriving expatriate Aboriginal community living up there, it’s all about money. Indonesian workers can churn out cheap copies of our artefacts by the shipload. And that’s very attractive for the businesses involved, which are happy to exploit or disrespect 40,000 years of culture in the pursuit of cashing in on gullible tourists. Taken - Update It is one of the most bizarre crimes 60 Minutes has ever encountered: the abduction last July of 20-year-old glamour model Chloe Ayling. She says she was snatched off a street in Milan and kept hostage in a remote Italian farmhouse while her kidnappers arranged to auction her off as a sex slave to the highest bidder. Chloe’s escape from this terrifying ordeal was so extraordinary that many accused her of making the whole story up – an elaborate publicity stunt for fame and fortune. Earlier this week a judge in an Italian court had his say, and as Liam Bartlett reports, the intrigue continues.
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