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60 Minutes: Secrets of War
Secrets of War
Nine  |  September 22, 2019

Damning allegations that elite soldiers from Australia's special forces committed potential war crimes during the conflict in Afghanistan, including the executions of innocent and unarmed civilians?

Damning allegations that elite soldiers from Australia's special forces committed potential war crimes during the conflict in Afghanistan, including the executions of innocent and unarmed civilians?

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50:52 | News and current affairs
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60 Minutes

September 27, 2020  |  Nine

The Bogeyman It's further proof of how perverted he is, but the man Australia now knows is the Claremont serial killer used to call himself the Bogeyman to people he met online. On Thursday, Bradley Robert Edwards was found guilty of murdering two young women in the mid-1990s. The judge at his trial said it was likely that he also abducted and killed a third woman, but because her body has never been found there was not enough evidence for a conviction. Notwithstanding that setback, the verdict ends more than two decades of fear in Perth. As Liam Bartlett reports, what is less well known about Edwards is that before he started on his killing spree, he violently attacked numerous other women. On 60 Minutes, one of his victims is speaking publicly for the first time about her incredible escape from evil. And Wendy Davis is also asking a very uncomfortable question of police: If her case had been investigated more seriously, could Edwards have been stopped much sooner? Angel Babies Sometimes it is easier to look the other way than confront a difficult subject head on. Up until now, stories about miscarriage have often fallen into that category. It's a topic few people talk about and even fewer understand. But there is a simple yet hard-to-believe fact which means it must be given more attention. One in four pregnancies ends in a miscarriage. When the unthinkable and unexpected occurs, a miscarriage is often associated with shame, blame and guilt. But as Tara Brown reports, that's just as wrong as ignoring it.

53:10 | News and current affairs
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60 Minutes

September 20, 2020  |  Nine

Lady and the Trumps Just as the world has never experienced a US president quite like Donald Trump, it's not seen a first lady like Melania Trump either. Despite being one of the most photographed women on the planet, she remains virtually unknown. But wealthy New York socialite Stephanie Winston Wolkoff is now controversially trying to change all that. She says she was "besties" with Melania for 15 years, and because of their friendship was not only appointed a senior adviser to the first lady, she was also asked to organise Trump's presidential inauguration. But two years ago the friendship between the two women soured. Stephanie claims she was the victim of an orchestrated political hit and was bitterly disappointed when Melania abandoned her. Many are calling it a despicable act of revenge, but Stephanie has now written a tell-all book about the first lady and her secrets, and as she explains to Liam Bartlett in an exclusive interview, there are plenty of secrets to tell about Melania and the Donald. The Long Haul In the fight against coronavirus COVID-19, working out why the disease attacks people differently is vital. It's so sneaky, because as often as it kills it can also be completely benign. But there's also another group of sufferers: an increasing number for whom recovering from the disease is not the end of their ordeal, it's just the beginning. They're not regaining normal health, which means tasks as simple as walking up a flight of stairs continue to be a struggle. As Tom Steinfort reports, the great worry for scientists is that these so-called COVID long-haul victims might bear the scars of the pandemic for the rest of their lives. Urban Legend For all of Keith Urban's phenomenal worldwide success, he remains delightfully unassuming and unaffected. It's a typically Australian trait that endears him to his millions of fans. On assignment for 60 Minutes, Peter Overton discovers that with Keith, what you see really is what you get. And that's a hardworking superstar who also loves being a husband and a dad.

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