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60 Minutes: Let Her Speak,The Brave One,The Block
Let Her Speak,The Brave One,The Block
Nine  |  November 11, 2018

An Aussie #MeToo outrage: Why is a young sexual assault victim being silenced by the law, and can Hollywood save the day? Plus, the brave warrior women protecting Africa's elephants. And a Willy Wonka adventure inside Lego's magical HQ.

An Aussie #MeToo outrage: Why is a young sexual assault victim being silenced by the law, and can Hollywood save the day? Plus, the brave warrior women protecting Africa's elephants. And a Willy Wonka adventure inside Lego's magical HQ.

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55:26 | News and current affairs
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60 Minutes

November 22, 2020  |  Nine

Terminal Hell Qatar is a small but wealthy country in the Persian Gulf. It promotes itself as a modern and progressive state that welcomes and respects foreign visitors. But that's far from the truth. In reality Qatar is a dangerous destination, especially for western women. Even transiting through its international airport is risky. As Sarah Abo reports, the problem is a culture of entrenched misogyny, which seven weeks ago resulted in an appalling incident where a large group of women, including 13 Australians, were snatched off flights and physically violated by Qatari authorities. For the first time one of the victims, a brave young woman from Victoria, tells of her nightmare at Doha International Airport. And the story of how she was assaulted is so unbelievable that not only will it outrage all Australians, it's sure to make people reassess future travel to or via Qatar. A Few Bad Men The shame brought upon the entire country by a few bad men from our military's special forces is a brutal truth Australians now have no choice but to handle. On Thursday the findings of a four-year-long Australian Defence Force inquiry into the war in Afghanistan were released. The report detailed shocking crimes, including murders, allegedly committed by men who were supposed to be our best-trained, most elite soldiers. What's staggering is the scale of the wrongdoing - 39 potentially unlawful deaths including Afghan civilians and children. Nick McKenzie has been at the forefront of the reporting of this story for three years. In an exclusive interview with 60 Minutes he asks the chief of army, Lieutenant General Rick Burr, to explain how this disaster was ever allowed to happen, and how far up the chain of command responsibility for it should rest. McMaster Class Just when we thought our relationship with China couldn't get any worse, Beijing has delivered Australia another punch. It's in the form of a list of 14 grievances it has with us and is polished off with an almighty threat: if you make an enemy of China, China will be the enemy! When that belligerence is combined with the upheaval of a new administration in Washington, it's clear we are facing a dangerous new world order, and the Pacific is likely to be an especially vulnerable region. For the best analysis of what the immediate future might hold, Tom Steinfort speaks with HR McMaster, a highly respected military man and former US national security adviser. But his expert assessment includes a grim warning. Australia, he reckons, has a battle on its hands. Game of Thrones: Update Everyone knows royal scandals rarely end well. But on 60 Minutes we have an unlikely exception. A few weeks ago, Liam Bartlett reported the dirty little secret of the Belgian royal family: that the former king, Albert the second, had had an 18-year affair and fathered a love child. His illegitimate daughter, Delphine Boel, kept quiet for years until she decided she had a right to be called a princess. When she took her case to court - and won - there was enormous embarrassment in the palace. But now in this intriguing game of thrones comes an unexpected rapprochement, and maybe even a fairytale ending.

49:14 | News and current affairs
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60 Minutes

November 15, 2020  |  Nine

The Final Battle On Thursday, Prime Minister Scott Morrison warned the country to brace for uncomfortable news. As unthinkable as it is, it seems men we've always thought of as heroes are not. An exhaustive four-year investigation by the inspector-general of the Australian Defence Force has found that a small group of soldiers from our elite special forces were potentially involved in shocking war crimes in Afghanistan. The IG's report is set to be released within days and is expected to detail a litany of heinous crimes committed against defenceless Afghans, including alleged executions. In a special report for 60 Minutes, Nick McKenzie will not only explain what went wrong with the special forces, but also the one piece of good news: how this story was uncovered rather than covered up. AC/DC Rock 'n' roll suffered an enormous hit a few years back when AC/DC turned down the volume and quietly faded into the background. But there was little choice. Co-founder Malcolm Young had lost his long battle with illness and other members of the group were plagued by their own demons. For a band that had been so phenomenally successful, not to mention phenomenally loud, for almost 50 years, the silence without AC/DC was deafening. But as Allison Langdon reveals in an exclusive interview with Angus Young and Brian Johnson, there's now been an unexpected yet incredible musical miracle which proves it is possible to do U-turns on the highway to Hell.

47:14 | News and current affairs
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60 Minutes

November 8, 2020  |  Nine

Biden His Time As vote counting continues in the US presidential election it appears increasingly likely that Joe Biden will finish the race for the White House ahead of Donald Trump. But that doesn't guarantee he will become America's next commander-in-chief. The incumbent president has already deployed an army of lawyers to challenge the results of the election. As Tara Brown reports, turmoil in the US is set to continue. The King and Thai Here's a regal dilemma to consider: Is it right for a king with 70 million subjects and wealth in excess of $70 billion to be seen frolicking around in a crop top rather than a crown? Many people in Thailand are outraged by the skimpy outfits their monarch, King Vajiralongkorn, loves to wear. And they're also furious at other aspects of his outlandish lifestyle - his womanising, his alleged brutality and the fact he seems to prefer the crisp air of the Bavarian Alps to the stifling humidity of Bangkok. Tom Steinfort reports that there is also the small matter of Fufu, the pet poodle the king controversially appointed as the chief marshall of Thailand's air force. Bananarama When you first think about it, it is utterly bananas that a band with such a silly name could go so far. Even Bananarama's founding members, Keren Woodward and Sara Dallin, think so. They pinch themselves that 40 years on from first teaming up they're still together and still performing. But as Liam Bartlett discovers in a charming interview with Keren and Sara, Bananarama's success is not nuts at all. It's all about having the talent to make some of pop's most memorable songs, combined with the energy needed to smash through the music industry's glass ceiling.

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