60 Minutes

60 Minutes

December 3, 2017
Nine  |  December 3, 2017

Australia's current affairs program with a proven record of excellence over several decades. Join television's top reporters as they investigate, analyse and uncover the issues affecting all Australians.

Australia's current affairs program with a proven record of excellence over several decades. Join television's top reporters as they investigate, analyse and uncover the issues affecting all Australians.

The Teller
The regard which Australians have for banks has never been lower, and with the banking Royal Commission recommencing its public hearings on Monday, it will probably sink even further. Liz Hayes meets a very brave former bank worker who, through shame, feels compelled to speak out. For three decades Catherine was a teller. She says at first it was an honourable job, and she genuinely thought her role was to help the customers, but then the banks started putting profits before people - and her bosses made her do the same.
The dirty tricks Catherine reveals provide an alarming insight into the culture of Australian banking institutions.

The Holy Real Estate
The great prize in the battle for dominance between Israelis and Palestinians is Jerusalem. Ironically, its name means “city of peace”, but that’s something neither side seems to want. This week there were more protests, and more deaths, after the United States relocated its embassy to the holy city. The move recognises Jerusalem as the capital of the Jewish state and that enrages Palestinians like nothing else.

The Royal Wedding
Allison Langdon reports on the most anticipated wedding in years, and asks palace insiders where to now for the Royal newlyweds?
The week leading up to her wedding to Prince Harry is not what Meghan Markle ever would have expected – with her own family stealing the bride-to-be’s limelight. While it has been a stressful time for Ms Markle, there’s one thing Hollywood celebrities and the Royal Family both understand – the show must go on!

60 Minutes: May 20, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs
47:25
The Teller The regard which Australians have for banks has never been lower, and with the banking Royal Commission recommencing its public hearings on Monday, it will probably sink even further. Liz Hayes meets a very brave former bank worker who, through shame, feels compelled to speak out. For three decades Catherine was a teller. She says at first it was an honourable job, and she genuinely thought her role was to help the customers, but then the banks started putting profits before people - and her bosses made her do the same. The dirty tricks Catherine reveals provide an alarming insight into the culture of Australian banking institutions. The Holy Real Estate The great prize in the battle for dominance between Israelis and Palestinians is Jerusalem. Ironically, its name means “city of peace”, but that’s something neither side seems to want. This week there were more protests, and more deaths, after the United States relocated its embassy to the holy city. The move recognises Jerusalem as the capital of the Jewish state and that enrages Palestinians like nothing else. The Royal Wedding Allison Langdon reports on the most anticipated wedding in years, and asks palace insiders where to now for the Royal newlyweds? The week leading up to her wedding to Prince Harry is not what Meghan Markle ever would have expected – with her own family stealing the bride-to-be’s limelight. While it has been a stressful time for Ms Markle, there’s one thing Hollywood celebrities and the Royal Family both understand – the show must go on!
Striking a Nerve
There's no question that bullying is shameful behaviour that claims too many young Australian lives. What is terrifying is that the tormentors no longer leave their taunts in the schoolyard. Technology and social media let bullies follow their victims home. For parents, the dilemma is how to protect their children. Last month Mark Bladen decided to confront the teenager he thought was bullying his daughter. But what started as heated words became an ugly and violent scuffle. Liz Hayes reports the outrage that followed was not what many expected.

Pay Up
In 2018, is it too much to ask that women be paid the same amount as men for doing the same job? Tara Brown investigates the gender pay gap, tracking the issue to Iceland the first country in the world to achieve mandatory pay parity for men and women.

100 million Dollar Baby
Not too many 21-year-old men can boast a Ferrari in their garage and a pop star girlfriend by their side. But there are not too many 21-year-olds like Aussie Ben Simmons. In a very short time, he has made a big name in the lucrative sport of basketball. Playing in his first year with NBA team the Philadelphia 76ers, he's done so well that he's already being compared to legends of the game such as Magic Johnson and LeBron James. Now there's intense speculation that his next playing contract will earn him $100 million. But as Tom Steinfort discovered after spending several days with Ben, none of the attention is going to his head. As the youngest of six kids, Ben's very grounded family simply won't allow it.

60 Minutes: Striking a Nerve/Pay Up/100 million Dollar Baby

News and current affairs

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs
49:41
Striking a Nerve There's no question that bullying is shameful behaviour that claims too many young Australian lives. What is terrifying is that the tormentors no longer leave their taunts in the schoolyard. Technology and social media let bullies follow their victims home. For parents, the dilemma is how to protect their children. Last month Mark Bladen decided to confront the teenager he thought was bullying his daughter. But what started as heated words became an ugly and violent scuffle. Liz Hayes reports the outrage that followed was not what many expected. Pay Up In 2018, is it too much to ask that women be paid the same amount as men for doing the same job? Tara Brown investigates the gender pay gap, tracking the issue to Iceland the first country in the world to achieve mandatory pay parity for men and women. 100 million Dollar Baby Not too many 21-year-old men can boast a Ferrari in their garage and a pop star girlfriend by their side. But there are not too many 21-year-olds like Aussie Ben Simmons. In a very short time, he has made a big name in the lucrative sport of basketball. Playing in his first year with NBA team the Philadelphia 76ers, he's done so well that he's already being compared to legends of the game such as Magic Johnson and LeBron James. Now there's intense speculation that his next playing contract will earn him $100 million. But as Tom Steinfort discovered after spending several days with Ben, none of the attention is going to his head. As the youngest of six kids, Ben's very grounded family simply won't allow it.
Deadly Danger
The problem with the word influenza is its misappropriated meaning. We get a cough or cold and then wrongly moan that we've got the flu. It's a mistake which means we don't take the real flu seriously enough, even though last year it killed 1100 Australians and put another 30,000 in hospital. It's a deadly danger but there is some good news. On assignment for 60 Minutes, Karl Stefanovic reports how scientists are working on a super vaccine to beat the different and often mutating strains of the virus. It is hoped that the new vaccine will be much more effective and longer lasting than the current annual flu jab. In the meantime, Australians need to do all they can to avoid the flu.

On the Brink
There is no diplomatic way of saying it: Russia and the West are heading to war. Last week's US-led airstrikes on Syria infuriated Moscow. But last month the West was equally enraged at the attempted assassination of a former Russian spy in the UK, using a nerve agent. That incident caused farcical tit-for-tat expulsions of Russian and Western diplomats in nearly 30 countries. So far no leaders are willing to blink or back down, but they do want to be heard. Vladimir Putin's man in Canberra, ambassador Grigory Logvinov, warns that Australia's blind support of Russia's enemies is helping to bring the world closer to global nuclear conflict.

Being Barry
Forget housewife superstar Dame Edna Everage and cultural attache Sir Les Patterson, Barry Humphries has another extraordinary character to add to his act. Himself. After 60 years of revealing his genius through others, audiences will now get to know the real Barry Humphries. And in a career as successful as his there's plenty to know, including how his demons almost destroyed him. But as Barry tells Liz Hayes in a candid and sometimes naughty interview, nothing can beat his addiction to making people laugh.

60 Minutes: Deadly Danger/On the Brink/Being Barry

News and current affairs

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs
51:29
Deadly Danger The problem with the word influenza is its misappropriated meaning. We get a cough or cold and then wrongly moan that we've got the flu. It's a mistake which means we don't take the real flu seriously enough, even though last year it killed 1100 Australians and put another 30,000 in hospital. It's a deadly danger but there is some good news. On assignment for 60 Minutes, Karl Stefanovic reports how scientists are working on a super vaccine to beat the different and often mutating strains of the virus. It is hoped that the new vaccine will be much more effective and longer lasting than the current annual flu jab. In the meantime, Australians need to do all they can to avoid the flu. On the Brink There is no diplomatic way of saying it: Russia and the West are heading to war. Last week's US-led airstrikes on Syria infuriated Moscow. But last month the West was equally enraged at the attempted assassination of a former Russian spy in the UK, using a nerve agent. That incident caused farcical tit-for-tat expulsions of Russian and Western diplomats in nearly 30 countries. So far no leaders are willing to blink or back down, but they do want to be heard. Vladimir Putin's man in Canberra, ambassador Grigory Logvinov, warns that Australia's blind support of Russia's enemies is helping to bring the world closer to global nuclear conflict. Being Barry Forget housewife superstar Dame Edna Everage and cultural attache Sir Les Patterson, Barry Humphries has another extraordinary character to add to his act. Himself. After 60 years of revealing his genius through others, audiences will now get to know the real Barry Humphries. And in a career as successful as his there's plenty to know, including how his demons almost destroyed him. But as Barry tells Liz Hayes in a candid and sometimes naughty interview, nothing can beat his addiction to making people laugh.
The Surgeon and the Soldier
When Munjed Al Muderis fled war-torn Iraq, he escaped with just two things: a medical journal and the determination to start a new life. In the years since, he has put both to great use. After arriving in Australia as an illegal immigrant, associate professor Al Muderis is now one of the most skilled surgeons in the world. His expertise is in a revolutionary procedure called osseointegration, which fuses human bones with robotic limbs. On assignment for 60 Minutes, Mark Burrows reports on an operation this remarkable surgeon performs to rebuild the often-troubled soldiers who fought in conflict zones like his old homeland - good men such as US Army captain Luis Montalvan.

The Yorkshire Rose
At 91, Jack Crane should be enjoying a quiet life at his home in Lithgow, west of Sydney. Instead he has found himself at the centre of one of World War Two's most intriguing mysteries, the disappearance of an RAF Stirling bomber known as the Yorkshire Rose. In June 1944 the plane was flying a top-secret mission deep inside Nazi-occupied France when it vanished. There's been no trace of it, or the 23 servicemen on board, since. But with a lot of help, Jack thinks he now knows where the Yorkshire Rose is and he's fighting reluctant bureaucrats at the British Ministry of Defence, demanding they conduct a search. He desperately needs answers because his brother Bob was the pilot, and after three-quarters of a century, time is running out to bring this war hero home.

Going for Gold
This time last year Lauren Parker was one of Australia's most promising triathletes. Supremely fit, her life was an exciting blur of international competition and full-time training. Then she was involved in a dreadful, freakish accident that left her paralysed. Sadly, Lauren wasn't just broken physically and mentally - she could see no hope. But after months of misery something extraordinary happened. Next week she'll be going for gold at the Commonwealth Games. Peter Overton reports on Lauren's inspiring reinvention, and how some mighty help from an unlikely friend got a gifted athlete back on track.

You Can
On this holiday weekend Peter Overton also meets a beautiful young Australian for whom life has not been a holiday. Jess Van Zeil is fighting a brutal battle with melanoma, but incredibly, despite her illness, she says she's a lucky one. That's because she has been able to receive treatment at the newly established Melbourne You Can Centre, a facility specially designed by young cancer patients, for young cancer patients. Jess's story highlights the urgent need to close the gap in care that currently exists for those with cancer who are aged between 15 and 25.

60 Minutes: The Surgeon and the Soldier/The Yorkshire Rose/Going for Gold/You Can

News and current affairs

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs
50:10
The Surgeon and the Soldier When Munjed Al Muderis fled war-torn Iraq, he escaped with just two things: a medical journal and the determination to start a new life. In the years since, he has put both to great use. After arriving in Australia as an illegal immigrant, associate professor Al Muderis is now one of the most skilled surgeons in the world. His expertise is in a revolutionary procedure called osseointegration, which fuses human bones with robotic limbs. On assignment for 60 Minutes, Mark Burrows reports on an operation this remarkable surgeon performs to rebuild the often-troubled soldiers who fought in conflict zones like his old homeland - good men such as US Army captain Luis Montalvan. The Yorkshire Rose At 91, Jack Crane should be enjoying a quiet life at his home in Lithgow, west of Sydney. Instead he has found himself at the centre of one of World War Two's most intriguing mysteries, the disappearance of an RAF Stirling bomber known as the Yorkshire Rose. In June 1944 the plane was flying a top-secret mission deep inside Nazi-occupied France when it vanished. There's been no trace of it, or the 23 servicemen on board, since. But with a lot of help, Jack thinks he now knows where the Yorkshire Rose is and he's fighting reluctant bureaucrats at the British Ministry of Defence, demanding they conduct a search. He desperately needs answers because his brother Bob was the pilot, and after three-quarters of a century, time is running out to bring this war hero home. Going for Gold This time last year Lauren Parker was one of Australia's most promising triathletes. Supremely fit, her life was an exciting blur of international competition and full-time training. Then she was involved in a dreadful, freakish accident that left her paralysed. Sadly, Lauren wasn't just broken physically and mentally - she could see no hope. But after months of misery something extraordinary happened. Next week she'll be going for gold at the Commonwealth Games. Peter Overton reports on Lauren's inspiring reinvention, and how some mighty help from an unlikely friend got a gifted athlete back on track. You Can On this holiday weekend Peter Overton also meets a beautiful young Australian for whom life has not been a holiday. Jess Van Zeil is fighting a brutal battle with melanoma, but incredibly, despite her illness, she says she's a lucky one. That's because she has been able to receive treatment at the newly established Melbourne You Can Centre, a facility specially designed by young cancer patients, for young cancer patients. Jess's story highlights the urgent need to close the gap in care that currently exists for those with cancer who are aged between 15 and 25.
Enough
This weekend many cities in the US will be taken over by teenagers, fed up with the way adults are running their country. The nationwide protests are to demand tougher gun controls. What's significant - and impressive - is that these rallies are being organised and led by the very students who last month endured the horror of seeing their own classmates gunned down at the Stoneman Douglas High School in Florida. Their simple message is getting louder by the day: enough is enough. And as Tom Steinfort reports, the students also have a very unlikely ally. Evan Ramsey is a convicted school shooter who is now spending the rest of his life in prison, regretting his moment of madness.

Help Us Before It's Too Late
It's difficult to imagine a more desperate situation or a more desperate mother. For 33 years Yvette Nichol did her very best to look after and raise her intellectually disabled son. But as they both got older, she needed to know he'd be cared for when she was gone. Try as she might to get help, it never came, so fearing he had no reasonable future, Yvette did something shocking and deeply troubling. She attempted to kill her child and herself. In a remarkably candid interview with Liz Hayes, Yvette explains what drove her to the brink, and how her drastic action has exposed a shameful truth about the ongoing care of disabled Australians.

Golden Girl
Although it seems as if she's been around for as long as anyone can remember, surely it cannot be true that Kylie Minogue is about to turn 50. For most of us, this showbiz idol is ageless, or at least perpetually twentysomething. And even more enviably, her career - in TV, movies and song - continues to flourish. It's little wonder Kylie's new album is called Golden. But in an exclusive interview with Karl Stefanovic, on assignment for 60 Minutes, Kylie reveals the pain of her recent broken engagement and talks about reports that it led to a nervous breakdown.

60 Minutes: Enough/Help Us Before It's Too Late/Golden Girl

News and current affairs

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs
47:40
Enough This weekend many cities in the US will be taken over by teenagers, fed up with the way adults are running their country. The nationwide protests are to demand tougher gun controls. What's significant - and impressive - is that these rallies are being organised and led by the very students who last month endured the horror of seeing their own classmates gunned down at the Stoneman Douglas High School in Florida. Their simple message is getting louder by the day: enough is enough. And as Tom Steinfort reports, the students also have a very unlikely ally. Evan Ramsey is a convicted school shooter who is now spending the rest of his life in prison, regretting his moment of madness. Help Us Before It's Too Late It's difficult to imagine a more desperate situation or a more desperate mother. For 33 years Yvette Nichol did her very best to look after and raise her intellectually disabled son. But as they both got older, she needed to know he'd be cared for when she was gone. Try as she might to get help, it never came, so fearing he had no reasonable future, Yvette did something shocking and deeply troubling. She attempted to kill her child and herself. In a remarkably candid interview with Liz Hayes, Yvette explains what drove her to the brink, and how her drastic action has exposed a shameful truth about the ongoing care of disabled Australians. Golden Girl Although it seems as if she's been around for as long as anyone can remember, surely it cannot be true that Kylie Minogue is about to turn 50. For most of us, this showbiz idol is ageless, or at least perpetually twentysomething. And even more enviably, her career - in TV, movies and song - continues to flourish. It's little wonder Kylie's new album is called Golden. But in an exclusive interview with Karl Stefanovic, on assignment for 60 Minutes, Kylie reveals the pain of her recent broken engagement and talks about reports that it led to a nervous breakdown.
Home of Horror
After enduring years of misery, there's finally some good news for the many victims of the Daruk Boys' Home at Windsor, north-west of Sydney. A breakthrough in a major police investigation means several men who have been accused of dreadful physical and sexual crimes against teenagers will soon be receiving a visit from detectives. And what 60 Minutes will also reveal is the identity of the superintendent of the government-run home whose job it was to protect the boys from harm. The young victims of the institution - now middle-aged men - say the superintendent not only refused to act on their claims of abuse, he punished them for speaking out in the first place. It led to even more suffering for the boys while he went on to a successful life in federal politics.

The Waco Insider
Waco, in the middle of Texas, used to be one of those American towns destined to be forever unremarkable. But 51 days of hell 25 years ago changed all that. It started when David Koresh, a cult leader who thought he was Jesus Christ, decided to take on the US government. There was a violent gun battle and 10 people, including four federal agents, were killed. But that bloodbath led to a bizarre standoff which lasted almost two months before Koresh, and 79 of his followers, were burned alive in a deliberately lit inferno. Only nine people survived. One of them was Australian man Graeme Craddock, and now for the first time he is telling what it was like inside Waco - and why he still believes David Koresh will one day return to Earth as the son of God.

60 Minutes: Home of Horror/The Waco Insider

News and current affairs

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs
47:04
Home of Horror After enduring years of misery, there's finally some good news for the many victims of the Daruk Boys' Home at Windsor, north-west of Sydney. A breakthrough in a major police investigation means several men who have been accused of dreadful physical and sexual crimes against teenagers will soon be receiving a visit from detectives. And what 60 Minutes will also reveal is the identity of the superintendent of the government-run home whose job it was to protect the boys from harm. The young victims of the institution - now middle-aged men - say the superintendent not only refused to act on their claims of abuse, he punished them for speaking out in the first place. It led to even more suffering for the boys while he went on to a successful life in federal politics. The Waco Insider Waco, in the middle of Texas, used to be one of those American towns destined to be forever unremarkable. But 51 days of hell 25 years ago changed all that. It started when David Koresh, a cult leader who thought he was Jesus Christ, decided to take on the US government. There was a violent gun battle and 10 people, including four federal agents, were killed. But that bloodbath led to a bizarre standoff which lasted almost two months before Koresh, and 79 of his followers, were burned alive in a deliberately lit inferno. Only nine people survived. One of them was Australian man Graeme Craddock, and now for the first time he is telling what it was like inside Waco - and why he still believes David Koresh will one day return to Earth as the son of God.
D for Disgrace
The past few weeks have been an exciting time for thousands of young Australians who have taken the educational leap from high school to university. For many of the students there's the added adventure of moving out of home and into on-campus residential colleges. But in a major 60 Minutes investigation, Allison Langdon exposes a sinister underbelly at many of these residences, a seedy culture of degrading initiation rituals. The "hazing", as it's called, is often dismissed as university tradition or harmless fun, but for an increasing number of victims who have been subjected to humiliating bullying and sexual assaults it's anything but. Even worse, many of the administrators of these residential colleges - the people responsible for looking after the students - are actually looking the other way.

Size Matter
It may seem obvious, but when it comes to big wave surfing, size definitely matters. And at up to 100 feet, or more than 30m, the largest and meanest waves in the world slam into a headland in Portugal called Nazare. Such is this monster break it often breaks those brave - or crazy - boardriders who attempt to take it on. Just this week, Australian surfer Ross Clarke Jones almost died after being wiped off a Nazare wave. But the precarious divide between disaster and glory is precisely the reason he and other Aussie big wave legends like Mick Corbett can't stay away from the place.

60 Minutes: D for Disgrace/Size Matters

News and current affairs

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs
42:55
D for Disgrace The past few weeks have been an exciting time for thousands of young Australians who have taken the educational leap from high school to university. For many of the students there's the added adventure of moving out of home and into on-campus residential colleges. But in a major 60 Minutes investigation, Allison Langdon exposes a sinister underbelly at many of these residences, a seedy culture of degrading initiation rituals. The "hazing", as it's called, is often dismissed as university tradition or harmless fun, but for an increasing number of victims who have been subjected to humiliating bullying and sexual assaults it's anything but. Even worse, many of the administrators of these residential colleges - the people responsible for looking after the students - are actually looking the other way. Size Matter It may seem obvious, but when it comes to big wave surfing, size definitely matters. And at up to 100 feet, or more than 30m, the largest and meanest waves in the world slam into a headland in Portugal called Nazare. Such is this monster break it often breaks those brave - or crazy - boardriders who attempt to take it on. Just this week, Australian surfer Ross Clarke Jones almost died after being wiped off a Nazare wave. But the precarious divide between disaster and glory is precisely the reason he and other Aussie big wave legends like Mick Corbett can't stay away from the place.
Warning!
There's no nice way to put it: Goran Markovic is a con artist. He's very good at being very bad, and no-one should ever believe or trust him. For 40 years he has been perfecting his nasty craft, lying his way around Australia and the world, fleecing almost everyone he encounters. From millionaire businessmen to unsuspecting women - anyone it seems is a potential target. Even police, tasked with trying to bring Markovic to justice, have been mocked and taunted by this elusive "catch me if you can" crook. But in a special 60 Minutes investigation, the tables are turned as the conman gets stung by two of his victims. Goran Markovic is finally caught and it's all on camera.

The Kiwi That Soared
Politicians in Australia need to take note. It is possible to be liked. For proof they only need to look at New Zealand's new prime minister, 37-year-old Jacinda Ardern. Four months after taking the top job, her approval ratings are soaring, with 70 percent of the country believing she's doing well. And now she's taking nation building to the next level by combining politics with pregnancy. When she gives birth in June, she'll be the first elected female leader in the western world to have a child in office. But becoming a mum isn't expected to slow Ms Ardern down - she says she'll be back running the country within weeks. As Charles Wooley finds out, Prime Minister Adern's no-fuss, can-do attitude is an enormous hit with Kiwi voters.

The Extroverted Introvert
Liam Bartlett's not sure if it's good news or bad news, but he has discovered there are actually two Robbie Williamses. One is one of the best-selling solo artists of all time, the charismatic and cheeky showman from the north of England. The other is a complete contradiction, an introspective, almost unsettled soul who often questions his self-worth. But no matter which Robbie Williams is in the room, Bartlett says both make for a must-watch interview.

60 Minutes: Warning!/The Kiwi That Soared/The Extroverted Introvert

News and current affairs

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs
52:37
Warning! There's no nice way to put it: Goran Markovic is a con artist. He's very good at being very bad, and no-one should ever believe or trust him. For 40 years he has been perfecting his nasty craft, lying his way around Australia and the world, fleecing almost everyone he encounters. From millionaire businessmen to unsuspecting women - anyone it seems is a potential target. Even police, tasked with trying to bring Markovic to justice, have been mocked and taunted by this elusive "catch me if you can" crook. But in a special 60 Minutes investigation, the tables are turned as the conman gets stung by two of his victims. Goran Markovic is finally caught and it's all on camera. The Kiwi That Soared Politicians in Australia need to take note. It is possible to be liked. For proof they only need to look at New Zealand's new prime minister, 37-year-old Jacinda Ardern. Four months after taking the top job, her approval ratings are soaring, with 70 percent of the country believing she's doing well. And now she's taking nation building to the next level by combining politics with pregnancy. When she gives birth in June, she'll be the first elected female leader in the western world to have a child in office. But becoming a mum isn't expected to slow Ms Ardern down - she says she'll be back running the country within weeks. As Charles Wooley finds out, Prime Minister Adern's no-fuss, can-do attitude is an enormous hit with Kiwi voters. The Extroverted Introvert Liam Bartlett's not sure if it's good news or bad news, but he has discovered there are actually two Robbie Williamses. One is one of the best-selling solo artists of all time, the charismatic and cheeky showman from the north of England. The other is a complete contradiction, an introspective, almost unsettled soul who often questions his self-worth. But no matter which Robbie Williams is in the room, Bartlett says both make for a must-watch interview.
Taken?
Chloe Ayling is a stunning and in-demand glamour model, but last July she was abducted off a street in Milan in Italy by two masked men. She was drugged, gagged, and held hostage in a remote farmhouse. The kidnappers' evil intention was to auction Chloe on the internet as a sex slave to the highest bidder. The plan failed, because the 20-year-old model says she was able outwit her captors. But Chloe's story of escape from this nightmare is almost too heroic to believe, and many people think she's lying.

I Love Lucy
There are two words prime ministers never want to hear in the same sentence: sex and scandal. Just ask Malcolm Turnbull, who has been lumbered with cleaning up the political mess caused by the personal life of his deputy, Barnaby Joyce. By Thursday, the prime minister had had enough of Joyce, describing his actions as a "shocking error of judgement". On Friday, Barnaby Joyce hit back, accusing Turnbull of being "inept and unnecessary" in his comments. This embarrassing crisis for the coalition government played out while Liz Hayes filmed a profile story on Malcolm Turnbull for 60 Minutes.

Bitcoin or Bitcon?
There has been an incredible amount of noise recently about the bitcoin boom. For canny - or lucky - investors who got in early, watching the value of this crypto-currency soar to unimaginable highs was like winning the lottery. The price of bitcoin is now rapidly retreating, but true believers say there are going to be many more digital goldrushes just like it. As Tom Steinfort discovers though, buyers need to beware, because this crypto-craziness is attracting the crypto-sharks, who are circling with some outrageously brazen scams.

60 Minutes: Taken?/I Love Lucy/Bitcoin or Bitcon?

News and current affairs

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs
54:39
Taken? Chloe Ayling is a stunning and in-demand glamour model, but last July she was abducted off a street in Milan in Italy by two masked men. She was drugged, gagged, and held hostage in a remote farmhouse. The kidnappers' evil intention was to auction Chloe on the internet as a sex slave to the highest bidder. The plan failed, because the 20-year-old model says she was able outwit her captors. But Chloe's story of escape from this nightmare is almost too heroic to believe, and many people think she's lying. I Love Lucy There are two words prime ministers never want to hear in the same sentence: sex and scandal. Just ask Malcolm Turnbull, who has been lumbered with cleaning up the political mess caused by the personal life of his deputy, Barnaby Joyce. By Thursday, the prime minister had had enough of Joyce, describing his actions as a "shocking error of judgement". On Friday, Barnaby Joyce hit back, accusing Turnbull of being "inept and unnecessary" in his comments. This embarrassing crisis for the coalition government played out while Liz Hayes filmed a profile story on Malcolm Turnbull for 60 Minutes. Bitcoin or Bitcon? There has been an incredible amount of noise recently about the bitcoin boom. For canny - or lucky - investors who got in early, watching the value of this crypto-currency soar to unimaginable highs was like winning the lottery. The price of bitcoin is now rapidly retreating, but true believers say there are going to be many more digital goldrushes just like it. As Tom Steinfort discovers though, buyers need to beware, because this crypto-craziness is attracting the crypto-sharks, who are circling with some outrageously brazen scams.
The Survivor
Twenty years ago this year the world was transfixed by the frantic search for life at the alpine ski resort of Thredbo. A landslide had obliterated two ski lodges, burying 19 people beneath an enormous deluge of mud, concrete and rock. As hours turned into days, and with temperatures plunging well below freezing, the prospect of finding survivors began to fade. That was until the muffled cries of Stuart Diver were heard from beneath the rubble. With incredible courage, Stuart clung to life as an extraordinary rescue effort got underway. And 65 nerve-wracking hours after the landslide, Thredbo's sole survivor emerged to the cheers of the world. 

For Stuart Diver the elation was short-lived. Numbed by the loss of his beloved wife Sally and so many close friends and neighbours, he struggled to rebuild his life. Eventually he found new love and looked to start a family. But once again tragedy struck when his second wife, Rosanna, was diagnosed with cancer. She lost her fight for life, but not before giving birth to a beautiful baby girl. In a breathtaking 60 Minutes interview, Stuart Diver speaks candidly to Tara Brown about Thredbo and his life of love and loss. We meet those who were pivotal to his survival and the daughter who has become his world. Two decades after the disaster, Stuart's incredible zest for life is an inspiration to us all.

Hamish and Andy
Like Dame Edna and Kylie before them, Hamish and Andy have achieved such a level of fame there's no need to bother with their last names. For the record though, they're Blake and Lee. The stars of radio and television have been making Australia laugh for 15 years now, although when the gangly duo first came to our attention, no-one predicted their longevity or celebrity. On 60 Minutes, Hamish and Andy share the rather simple secret to their business success - if they're having fun, then so too will their fans. Liz Hayes is also invited behind the scenes to meet the best mates' families and she discovers there's a new generation of performer who can't wait to steal the show.

60 Minutes: The Survivor/Hamish and Andy

News and current affairs

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs
45:58
The Survivor Twenty years ago this year the world was transfixed by the frantic search for life at the alpine ski resort of Thredbo. A landslide had obliterated two ski lodges, burying 19 people beneath an enormous deluge of mud, concrete and rock. As hours turned into days, and with temperatures plunging well below freezing, the prospect of finding survivors began to fade. That was until the muffled cries of Stuart Diver were heard from beneath the rubble. With incredible courage, Stuart clung to life as an extraordinary rescue effort got underway. And 65 nerve-wracking hours after the landslide, Thredbo's sole survivor emerged to the cheers of the world. For Stuart Diver the elation was short-lived. Numbed by the loss of his beloved wife Sally and so many close friends and neighbours, he struggled to rebuild his life. Eventually he found new love and looked to start a family. But once again tragedy struck when his second wife, Rosanna, was diagnosed with cancer. She lost her fight for life, but not before giving birth to a beautiful baby girl. In a breathtaking 60 Minutes interview, Stuart Diver speaks candidly to Tara Brown about Thredbo and his life of love and loss. We meet those who were pivotal to his survival and the daughter who has become his world. Two decades after the disaster, Stuart's incredible zest for life is an inspiration to us all. Hamish and Andy Like Dame Edna and Kylie before them, Hamish and Andy have achieved such a level of fame there's no need to bother with their last names. For the record though, they're Blake and Lee. The stars of radio and television have been making Australia laugh for 15 years now, although when the gangly duo first came to our attention, no-one predicted their longevity or celebrity. On 60 Minutes, Hamish and Andy share the rather simple secret to their business success - if they're having fun, then so too will their fans. Liz Hayes is also invited behind the scenes to meet the best mates' families and she discovers there's a new generation of performer who can't wait to steal the show.
Family Ties
Allison Langdon reports that while embryo donation can be the most generous gift of all, it also comes with risks, and one very tough question: Just what are the implications of giving your unborn child to a complete stranger?

Pauline Hanson
The expectations were high, but in this weekend's Queensland election the One Nation political party has suffered a very public embarrassing and disappointing result. On 60 Minutes, Pauline Hanson speaks exclusively to Liz Hayes to discuss where to from here.

Them 4
For 41 years, rock band U2 have had the world singing and thinking. The Irish group are almost as well known for their politics as their countless hits. Bono, the Edge, Larry Mullen Jr and Adam Clayton were teenagers in Dublin when they got together in 1976 to avoid the bleak prospect of unemployment. As they say, the rest is history, but when Tara Brown sat down with them in Brazil she found a group not prepared to live off the success of their past. Next week U2 will release their 14th album, Songs of Experience, and they seem just as hungry and joyfully defiant as ever. U2 also let Tara in on a little secret: after a seven-year absence they could be on their way to Australia next year.

Wanderlust!
Somewhere out in the backblocks of Australia's red centre there's a cloud of dust created by a battered old 1979 Toyota Land Cruiser called Alice. Behind the wheel is a wonderful young woman, Edwina Robertson, and next to her, her bitsa dog, Jordie. Alice, Edwina and Jordie are on a mission to discover Australia and bridge the great divide between city and bush. Edwina, or Eddy as she is known, doesn't have any money, so she is funding her journey by trading her skills as a professional photographer with bush families, in return for hospitality and a bit of fuel for Alice. It's such a simple yet glorious adventure that Charles Wooley decided he just had to hitch a ride.

60 Minutes: Family Ties/Pauline Hanson/Them 4/Wanderlust!

News and current affairs

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs
54:10
Family Ties Allison Langdon reports that while embryo donation can be the most generous gift of all, it also comes with risks, and one very tough question: Just what are the implications of giving your unborn child to a complete stranger? Pauline Hanson The expectations were high, but in this weekend's Queensland election the One Nation political party has suffered a very public embarrassing and disappointing result. On 60 Minutes, Pauline Hanson speaks exclusively to Liz Hayes to discuss where to from here. Them 4 For 41 years, rock band U2 have had the world singing and thinking. The Irish group are almost as well known for their politics as their countless hits. Bono, the Edge, Larry Mullen Jr and Adam Clayton were teenagers in Dublin when they got together in 1976 to avoid the bleak prospect of unemployment. As they say, the rest is history, but when Tara Brown sat down with them in Brazil she found a group not prepared to live off the success of their past. Next week U2 will release their 14th album, Songs of Experience, and they seem just as hungry and joyfully defiant as ever. U2 also let Tara in on a little secret: after a seven-year absence they could be on their way to Australia next year. Wanderlust! Somewhere out in the backblocks of Australia's red centre there's a cloud of dust created by a battered old 1979 Toyota Land Cruiser called Alice. Behind the wheel is a wonderful young woman, Edwina Robertson, and next to her, her bitsa dog, Jordie. Alice, Edwina and Jordie are on a mission to discover Australia and bridge the great divide between city and bush. Edwina, or Eddy as she is known, doesn't have any money, so she is funding her journey by trading her skills as a professional photographer with bush families, in return for hospitality and a bit of fuel for Alice. It's such a simple yet glorious adventure that Charles Wooley decided he just had to hitch a ride.
For The Love Of Leah
When Ben Debono's wife of three months, Leah, died of melanoma earlier this year he was heartbroken - until his grief was overtaken by anger. Ben says 29-year-old Leah should still be alive. Like most Australians, she was sun-smart and knew the dangers of melanoma. When she noticed an unusual mole on her arm she immediately had it examined by two doctors. They reassured Leah she had nothing to worry about, but they were wrong. Now Ben is on a crusade, travelling the country on the honeymoon he never had, warning other Australians about the risks of this deadly disease.

The Russian Connection
For anyone who thinks Malcolm Turnbull's leadership is in turmoil, it's nothing compared to what is happening in the US with President Donald Trump. A year on from the election, he continues to be dogged by accusations that he only won the top job because of Russian meddling. The most serious claims - currently being investigated by the FBI - are that Russian spies offered the Trump campaign dirt on Democrat opponent Hillary Clinton in return for a promise to overturn tough anti-corruption laws. Ross Coulthart reports from the US that if the allegations are proven, key members of Donald Trump's inner circle could go to prison - and eventually, even the president himself.

Island Of Horror
As far as gripping, real-life crime thrillers go, this one has everything: a mutiny, a psychopath and a brutal mass murder. It's a 388-year-old cold case mystery that dates back to 1629 when the Dutch sailing ship, Batavia, struck a tiny atoll off the West Australian coast near Geraldton. Almost 300 passengers and crew survived the shipwreck but over the next few months, as they waited to be rescued, more than 100 were slaughtered. For centuries their bodies lay buried, the story forgotten. But now the search for the truth about Australia's greatest mass murder is underway as archaeologists from Australia and the Netherlands dig up new clues - and victims.

60 Minutes: For The Love Of Leah/The Russian Connection/Island Of Horror

News and current affairs

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs
49:41
For The Love Of Leah When Ben Debono's wife of three months, Leah, died of melanoma earlier this year he was heartbroken - until his grief was overtaken by anger. Ben says 29-year-old Leah should still be alive. Like most Australians, she was sun-smart and knew the dangers of melanoma. When she noticed an unusual mole on her arm she immediately had it examined by two doctors. They reassured Leah she had nothing to worry about, but they were wrong. Now Ben is on a crusade, travelling the country on the honeymoon he never had, warning other Australians about the risks of this deadly disease. The Russian Connection For anyone who thinks Malcolm Turnbull's leadership is in turmoil, it's nothing compared to what is happening in the US with President Donald Trump. A year on from the election, he continues to be dogged by accusations that he only won the top job because of Russian meddling. The most serious claims - currently being investigated by the FBI - are that Russian spies offered the Trump campaign dirt on Democrat opponent Hillary Clinton in return for a promise to overturn tough anti-corruption laws. Ross Coulthart reports from the US that if the allegations are proven, key members of Donald Trump's inner circle could go to prison - and eventually, even the president himself. Island Of Horror As far as gripping, real-life crime thrillers go, this one has everything: a mutiny, a psychopath and a brutal mass murder. It's a 388-year-old cold case mystery that dates back to 1629 when the Dutch sailing ship, Batavia, struck a tiny atoll off the West Australian coast near Geraldton. Almost 300 passengers and crew survived the shipwreck but over the next few months, as they waited to be rescued, more than 100 were slaughtered. For centuries their bodies lay buried, the story forgotten. But now the search for the truth about Australia's greatest mass murder is underway as archaeologists from Australia and the Netherlands dig up new clues - and victims.
Girl Power
Hannah Mouncey was in demand by the top clubs to play in the newly established AFL women's competition, the AFLW. But the AFL said no. It decided she was too much of a physical threat to her opponents. For many it seems like a clear case of discrimination. However this case is not that simple - Hannah wasn't born a girl.

Bloodlines
Renee McBryde and Samantha Byran live worlds apart but share a terrible truth. They are the innocent offspring of cold-blooded killers, their fathers both convicted murderers. But discovering that dark secret hasn't been the only torment for these two young women. More troubling is the lurking question: Are killers made or born? And is there such a thing as a murder gene?

Band Of Brothers
This year marks 40 years since six high school mates from the Northern Beaches of Sydney got together and formed what would be one of the biggest rock bands in the world, INXS. This month also sees another anniversary, one nobody wants to celebrate - 20 years since Hutchence was found dead in a Sydney hotel room. On 60 Minutes the remaining five original band members pay tribute to the Michael they knew, a fun, caring but mischievous friend.

Genetic Curse
A few days ago Veronica Neave celebrated her 50th birthday, and the greatest gift she received was the news that doctors had not yet diagnosed her with cancer. It sounds strange, but in the Neave family being healthy is rare because so many of them have been cursed with the BRCA 2 cancer gene mutation. And while she is surviving and thriving, she is determined to honour her family by helping others.

60 Minutes: Girl Power/Bloodlines/Band Of Brothers/Genetic Curse

News and current affairs

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs
55:26
Girl Power Hannah Mouncey was in demand by the top clubs to play in the newly established AFL women's competition, the AFLW. But the AFL said no. It decided she was too much of a physical threat to her opponents. For many it seems like a clear case of discrimination. However this case is not that simple - Hannah wasn't born a girl. Bloodlines Renee McBryde and Samantha Byran live worlds apart but share a terrible truth. They are the innocent offspring of cold-blooded killers, their fathers both convicted murderers. But discovering that dark secret hasn't been the only torment for these two young women. More troubling is the lurking question: Are killers made or born? And is there such a thing as a murder gene? Band Of Brothers This year marks 40 years since six high school mates from the Northern Beaches of Sydney got together and formed what would be one of the biggest rock bands in the world, INXS. This month also sees another anniversary, one nobody wants to celebrate - 20 years since Hutchence was found dead in a Sydney hotel room. On 60 Minutes the remaining five original band members pay tribute to the Michael they knew, a fun, caring but mischievous friend. Genetic Curse A few days ago Veronica Neave celebrated her 50th birthday, and the greatest gift she received was the news that doctors had not yet diagnosed her with cancer. It sounds strange, but in the Neave family being healthy is rare because so many of them have been cursed with the BRCA 2 cancer gene mutation. And while she is surviving and thriving, she is determined to honour her family by helping others.
Shock And Poor
Who hasn't been shocked by a recent electricity or gas bill? And who isn't infuriated that power prices have risen so sharply? In a country as abundant with resources as ours it defies logic that there are now some Australians who can't even pay for the electricity or gas to cook a simple meal. While federal - and state - politicians scramble to act, Elon Musk, the American billionaire with the brilliant mind, says he wants to help.

The Bridges Of Calorie Counting
There's an impressive statistic Michelle Bridges uses in her campaign to make us healthier. She says those people who have followed her advice have lost more than 1.5 million kilograms of fat. That's equivalent to the total weight of 20,000 Australian adults. There is no question that this is a substantial achievement, but why then is the personal trainer made famous by TV's The Biggest Loser so controversial?

Snappy Feet
In fiction and in reality the crocodile has generated some amazing Australian characters. Think Dundee and Irwin. And there's another we all should know - the Barefoot Bushman. Rob Bredl is a shoeless showman who relies on the science of animal behaviour to ride on the backs of monster crocs, all the while insisting that playing with them is not as dangerous as it looks. That's a position he still holds even though last year one of his beloved animals grabbed him in a death roll and tried to eat his arm.

60 Minutes: Shock And Poor/The Bridges Of Calorie Counting/Snappy Feet

News and current affairs

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs
54:24
Shock And Poor Who hasn't been shocked by a recent electricity or gas bill? And who isn't infuriated that power prices have risen so sharply? In a country as abundant with resources as ours it defies logic that there are now some Australians who can't even pay for the electricity or gas to cook a simple meal. While federal - and state - politicians scramble to act, Elon Musk, the American billionaire with the brilliant mind, says he wants to help. The Bridges Of Calorie Counting There's an impressive statistic Michelle Bridges uses in her campaign to make us healthier. She says those people who have followed her advice have lost more than 1.5 million kilograms of fat. That's equivalent to the total weight of 20,000 Australian adults. There is no question that this is a substantial achievement, but why then is the personal trainer made famous by TV's The Biggest Loser so controversial? Snappy Feet In fiction and in reality the crocodile has generated some amazing Australian characters. Think Dundee and Irwin. And there's another we all should know - the Barefoot Bushman. Rob Bredl is a shoeless showman who relies on the science of animal behaviour to ride on the backs of monster crocs, all the while insisting that playing with them is not as dangerous as it looks. That's a position he still holds even though last year one of his beloved animals grabbed him in a death roll and tried to eat his arm.
Winx
Horse racing might be the sport of kings, but right now in Australia it's a queen who rules the track. A flying machine named Winx. This six-year-old mare has won her last 19 races in a row and this weekend she'll be trying to make it number 20. With the victories come the great rewards. Winx has won almost $13.5 million in prize money so far. Soon she'll become the turf's top earner of all time. But there's more to this amazing madam than just winning. Peter Stefanovic meets the team behind Winx - her trainer, jockey and three lucky owners - and reports how they're all having the ride of their lives.

The Man Who Killed Bin Laden
If anyone tried to imagine what a highly skilled, ruthless assassin might look like, Robert O'Neill's image would not spring to mind. But beyond his friendly face and benign demeanour, O'Neill is a man who has spent much of his adult life learning to kill. In May 2011, every bit of the US Navy SEAL's training was tested when he lined up the western world's greatest single enemy, Osama bin Laden, in his gunsights. O'Neill didn't flinch - he pulled the trigger.

Foo Fighters
There was no way reporter Allison Langdon was going to refuse the invitation to interview and spend a couple of days with Dave Grohl and Taylor Hawkins from the hugely successful band, Foo Fighters. However, she accepted her assignment with a sense of trepidation, because she already knew encounters with the Fooeys tend to be rather unpredictable - no-one is ever quite sure what's about to happen or why. Grohl and Hawkins have well and truly worked out that every waking moment of life is for living. As well as not having an off switch they also have no filter, which is a nice way of saying their language is as colourful as their lives. But more than anything, these rock legends are great fun, and their music's not too bad either.

60 Minutes: Winx/The Man Who Killed Bin Laden/Foo Fighters

News and current affairs

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs
49:37
Winx Horse racing might be the sport of kings, but right now in Australia it's a queen who rules the track. A flying machine named Winx. This six-year-old mare has won her last 19 races in a row and this weekend she'll be trying to make it number 20. With the victories come the great rewards. Winx has won almost $13.5 million in prize money so far. Soon she'll become the turf's top earner of all time. But there's more to this amazing madam than just winning. Peter Stefanovic meets the team behind Winx - her trainer, jockey and three lucky owners - and reports how they're all having the ride of their lives. The Man Who Killed Bin Laden If anyone tried to imagine what a highly skilled, ruthless assassin might look like, Robert O'Neill's image would not spring to mind. But beyond his friendly face and benign demeanour, O'Neill is a man who has spent much of his adult life learning to kill. In May 2011, every bit of the US Navy SEAL's training was tested when he lined up the western world's greatest single enemy, Osama bin Laden, in his gunsights. O'Neill didn't flinch - he pulled the trigger. Foo Fighters There was no way reporter Allison Langdon was going to refuse the invitation to interview and spend a couple of days with Dave Grohl and Taylor Hawkins from the hugely successful band, Foo Fighters. However, she accepted her assignment with a sense of trepidation, because she already knew encounters with the Fooeys tend to be rather unpredictable - no-one is ever quite sure what's about to happen or why. Grohl and Hawkins have well and truly worked out that every waking moment of life is for living. As well as not having an off switch they also have no filter, which is a nice way of saying their language is as colourful as their lives. But more than anything, these rock legends are great fun, and their music's not too bad either.
In Ireland, women can go to jail for getting an abortion, even in cases of rape. As the country votes on whether to change its conservative abortion laws, we take the pulse of a nation divided down the middle.
On May 25, Ireland heading to the polls in a landmark referendum that could finally overturn its abortion laws.
Enshrined in the country's constitution is the protection of the unborn’s right to life – but at what cost?
Dateline reporter Shaunagh Connaire goes to the heart of the referendum debate to meet women and families from both sides of a bitterly divisive issue.
Hitting the streets of Waterford, Shaunagh meets a new generation of young, grassroots campaigners called the Youth Defence who are fighting hard to keep Ireland abortion free. 
“This is a human rights issue," explains Christine Darcy, a trainee teacher working for Youth Defence.
"We have constitutional protection of the unborn, like an equal right to life for the mother and the baby. Why would we take that out of our constitution?"
For many Irish women, the current laws are driving them to extreme lengths - In 2016, 3,265 Irish women travelled to the UK to get an abortion.
Due to the expense, and lack of local support, most make the trip in one day, risking their health in the process. 
"I was given a card with a number on it in order to protect your identity," says one such woman Cathy, who paid £400 for her surgical abortion in a Manchester clinic.
“It’s really heartbreaking to know that you are almost being exported; that this country doesn’t want to know about your problems or your issues.”

Dateline: Ireland's Abortion Debate

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
26:02
In Ireland, women can go to jail for getting an abortion, even in cases of rape. As the country votes on whether to change its conservative abortion laws, we take the pulse of a nation divided down the middle. On May 25, Ireland heading to the polls in a landmark referendum that could finally overturn its abortion laws. Enshrined in the country's constitution is the protection of the unborn’s right to life – but at what cost? Dateline reporter Shaunagh Connaire goes to the heart of the referendum debate to meet women and families from both sides of a bitterly divisive issue. Hitting the streets of Waterford, Shaunagh meets a new generation of young, grassroots campaigners called the Youth Defence who are fighting hard to keep Ireland abortion free. “This is a human rights issue," explains Christine Darcy, a trainee teacher working for Youth Defence. "We have constitutional protection of the unborn, like an equal right to life for the mother and the baby. Why would we take that out of our constitution?" For many Irish women, the current laws are driving them to extreme lengths - In 2016, 3,265 Irish women travelled to the UK to get an abortion. Due to the expense, and lack of local support, most make the trip in one day, risking their health in the process. "I was given a card with a number on it in order to protect your identity," says one such woman Cathy, who paid £400 for her surgical abortion in a Manchester clinic. “It’s really heartbreaking to know that you are almost being exported; that this country doesn’t want to know about your problems or your issues.”
Complict
Complicit: the workers paying the price for our mobile phone obsession.
"There were iPhone screens and Nokia screens...I held the phone screen in my left hand, and a piece of cloth in my right hand... Wiping was the only thing I did besides eating and sleeping." Teenage worker
Mobile phones, smartphones and tablets have revolutionised the way we communicate but the technology we are addicted to has had toxic consequences.
"I knew we worked with chemicals, but I had no idea that it's poison." Young worker
China produces approximately 90% of the world's consumer electronics. The factories making the components for these electronic goods are filled with young workers. Some have been exposed to poisonous chemicals, with devastating results.
"Many co-workers developed the exact same symptoms. When I walked, it looked like I had uneven legs. It would take 10 minutes to take a two-minute walk. My legs felt too heavy to move." Worker
This investigation, filmed secretly over four years, exposed the use of harmful chemicals in the factories producing the products many of us use. Hidden cameras captured the working conditions inside the factories churning out these products.
"It was the cleaning solution he used, which contained benzene, when he was working at the electronics factory that caused his disease." Father of sick worker
The film charts the growing realisation amongst the workers that their illnesses stem from their work and follows their fight for compensation.
"After we discovered so many workers with leukemia...more media reports followed up and showed that these workers were chemically poisoned." Worker activist
The landmark investigation led Apple to ban the use of benzene, a known carcinogen, and n-hexane, a chemical that damages the nervous system.
But the ban does not apply to subcontractors who make up two-thirds of Apple's supply chain. And around 500 other chemicals are still used to produce electronics, mostly in the developing world, where there are few or no regulations to protect the workers who make them.
"Many of the workers that I've helped got occupational diseases due to exposure to toxic chemicals. Many are from the electronics industry. They made cell phones, computers, semiconductors etc." Worker activist.

Four Corners: May 21, 2018

News and current affairs, Civics and citizenship

Years 11-12 News and current affairs, Civics and citizenship
43:45
Complict Complicit: the workers paying the price for our mobile phone obsession. "There were iPhone screens and Nokia screens...I held the phone screen in my left hand, and a piece of cloth in my right hand... Wiping was the only thing I did besides eating and sleeping." Teenage worker Mobile phones, smartphones and tablets have revolutionised the way we communicate but the technology we are addicted to has had toxic consequences. "I knew we worked with chemicals, but I had no idea that it's poison." Young worker China produces approximately 90% of the world's consumer electronics. The factories making the components for these electronic goods are filled with young workers. Some have been exposed to poisonous chemicals, with devastating results. "Many co-workers developed the exact same symptoms. When I walked, it looked like I had uneven legs. It would take 10 minutes to take a two-minute walk. My legs felt too heavy to move." Worker This investigation, filmed secretly over four years, exposed the use of harmful chemicals in the factories producing the products many of us use. Hidden cameras captured the working conditions inside the factories churning out these products. "It was the cleaning solution he used, which contained benzene, when he was working at the electronics factory that caused his disease." Father of sick worker The film charts the growing realisation amongst the workers that their illnesses stem from their work and follows their fight for compensation. "After we discovered so many workers with leukemia...more media reports followed up and showed that these workers were chemically poisoned." Worker activist The landmark investigation led Apple to ban the use of benzene, a known carcinogen, and n-hexane, a chemical that damages the nervous system. But the ban does not apply to subcontractors who make up two-thirds of Apple's supply chain. And around 500 other chemicals are still used to produce electronics, mostly in the developing world, where there are few or no regulations to protect the workers who make them. "Many of the workers that I've helped got occupational diseases due to exposure to toxic chemicals. Many are from the electronics industry. They made cell phones, computers, semiconductors etc." Worker activist.
Family businesses sent to the wall by their own banks
The Banking Royal Commission has today been hearing about the dysfunctional world of lending to small business. Two business owners tell 7.30 their stories about dealing with the banks. One even blames his lender for sending him broke.

More government MPs come out in support of outlawing live sheep exports
Late last week it seemed that the Turnbull government had stared down the intense political pressure to close down live sheep exports. But it now seems some of its own backbenchers, including a former minister, are agitating for change.

Investigation to go ahead into Israeli response to Gaza protest shootings
An international investigation will examine Israel's lethal response to protest in Gaza, which have left more than 100 Palestinians dead this year. Protests and shootings at Israel's fence around Gaza are a long running feature of life Palestinian territory.

Stargazers turn their eyes to the sky in a record attempt
Thousands of amateur astronomers will this week attempt to break the world record for the most stargazers at multiple venues. It's part of the BBC's popular Stargazing Live program, and it's co-host, Professor Brian Cox, has done as much as anyone to take science, and particularly astronomy to a mass audience.

Hundreds of Commonwealth Games attendees are asking for protection visas
Lawyer David Manne says he is representing a number of people who attended the Commonwealth Games and are now seeking asylum in Australia.

7.30: May 21, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
30:22
Family businesses sent to the wall by their own banks The Banking Royal Commission has today been hearing about the dysfunctional world of lending to small business. Two business owners tell 7.30 their stories about dealing with the banks. One even blames his lender for sending him broke. More government MPs come out in support of outlawing live sheep exports Late last week it seemed that the Turnbull government had stared down the intense political pressure to close down live sheep exports. But it now seems some of its own backbenchers, including a former minister, are agitating for change. Investigation to go ahead into Israeli response to Gaza protest shootings An international investigation will examine Israel's lethal response to protest in Gaza, which have left more than 100 Palestinians dead this year. Protests and shootings at Israel's fence around Gaza are a long running feature of life Palestinian territory. Stargazers turn their eyes to the sky in a record attempt Thousands of amateur astronomers will this week attempt to break the world record for the most stargazers at multiple venues. It's part of the BBC's popular Stargazing Live program, and it's co-host, Professor Brian Cox, has done as much as anyone to take science, and particularly astronomy to a mass audience. Hundreds of Commonwealth Games attendees are asking for protection visas Lawyer David Manne says he is representing a number of people who attended the Commonwealth Games and are now seeking asylum in Australia.
The Teller
The regard which Australians have for banks has never been lower, and with the banking Royal Commission recommencing its public hearings on Monday, it will probably sink even further. Liz Hayes meets a very brave former bank worker who, through shame, feels compelled to speak out. For three decades Catherine was a teller. She says at first it was an honourable job, and she genuinely thought her role was to help the customers, but then the banks started putting profits before people - and her bosses made her do the same.
The dirty tricks Catherine reveals provide an alarming insight into the culture of Australian banking institutions.

The Holy Real Estate
The great prize in the battle for dominance between Israelis and Palestinians is Jerusalem. Ironically, its name means “city of peace”, but that’s something neither side seems to want. This week there were more protests, and more deaths, after the United States relocated its embassy to the holy city. The move recognises Jerusalem as the capital of the Jewish state and that enrages Palestinians like nothing else.

The Royal Wedding
Allison Langdon reports on the most anticipated wedding in years, and asks palace insiders where to now for the Royal newlyweds?
The week leading up to her wedding to Prince Harry is not what Meghan Markle ever would have expected – with her own family stealing the bride-to-be’s limelight. While it has been a stressful time for Ms Markle, there’s one thing Hollywood celebrities and the Royal Family both understand – the show must go on!

60 Minutes: May 20, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs
47:25
The Teller The regard which Australians have for banks has never been lower, and with the banking Royal Commission recommencing its public hearings on Monday, it will probably sink even further. Liz Hayes meets a very brave former bank worker who, through shame, feels compelled to speak out. For three decades Catherine was a teller. She says at first it was an honourable job, and she genuinely thought her role was to help the customers, but then the banks started putting profits before people - and her bosses made her do the same. The dirty tricks Catherine reveals provide an alarming insight into the culture of Australian banking institutions. The Holy Real Estate The great prize in the battle for dominance between Israelis and Palestinians is Jerusalem. Ironically, its name means “city of peace”, but that’s something neither side seems to want. This week there were more protests, and more deaths, after the United States relocated its embassy to the holy city. The move recognises Jerusalem as the capital of the Jewish state and that enrages Palestinians like nothing else. The Royal Wedding Allison Langdon reports on the most anticipated wedding in years, and asks palace insiders where to now for the Royal newlyweds? The week leading up to her wedding to Prince Harry is not what Meghan Markle ever would have expected – with her own family stealing the bride-to-be’s limelight. While it has been a stressful time for Ms Markle, there’s one thing Hollywood celebrities and the Royal Family both understand – the show must go on!
Loading...