Chloe's Law - Clip From 60 Minutes

Community clip

Chloe's Law - Clip From 60 Minutes

Clip from 60 Minutes  |  Nine  |  November 10, 2013
Classification: Not Classified Classification: Not Classified
This video has closed captioning

Chloe Fergusson endured bullying both verbal and physical assaults for years but it was social media bullying that led her to ta

Chloe Fergusson endured bullying both verbal and physical assaults for years but it was social media bullying that led her to ta

Community clip
The big step
Six-year-old Isabella Lombardo is a real chatterbox. Smart and beautiful, she lights up any room. But she has lived her short life debilitated by cerebral palsy. It’s a tough disorder, and when it was diagnosed her mum and dad vowed to do anything and everything they could to help their precious daughter. For four years Libby and Joseph Lombardo searched the world and spent all their savings, but eventually found a radical new stem-cell treatment in Mexico. The prize it offered was the hope Isabella might walk for the first time. Then they faced the most difficult decision of all: should they put their faith – and their daughter’s life – in the hands of unknown doctors and untested science?
ISIS bride, Aussie baby
It would be easy to give Islam Mitat the coldest of shoulders, to ignore her despair and say we couldn’t care less about her. After all she was an ISIS bride, married to a British jihadi, and living at the front line of the war in Syria. And when, not surprisingly, her husband was killed in battle, she married an Australian ISIS fighter and had his baby. He too paid the ultimate price for his beliefs, leaving Islam with no choice but to make a daring and dangerous escape. Now, in an exclusive 60 MINUTES interview conducted in a secret North African location, she tells Tara Brown she was tricked into going to Syria in the first place. It’s a revelation that raises serious questions. Should we believe her? And what should become of this ISIS bride and her Aussie baby?
The long paddock
Unless you’ve had your head stuck in the non-existent clouds, you’d know large tracts of eastern Australia are in the iron grip of the nastiest drought in 50 years. The experts say if there isn’t rain soon it will become the worst drought since records were first kept. But while there has been a flood of stories about desperation and despair, Charles Wooley reckons it’s just as important to highlight the incredible resilience of the people on the land, despite these hardest of times. Way out beyond Tamworth in country New South Wales he met the wonderful Hourigan family, drovers who are moving 900 head of cattle along what is known as “the long paddock”.

60 Minutes: The Big Step/ ISIS Bride/ The Long Paddock

News and current affairs

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs
50:10
The big step Six-year-old Isabella Lombardo is a real chatterbox. Smart and beautiful, she lights up any room. But she has lived her short life debilitated by cerebral palsy. It’s a tough disorder, and when it was diagnosed her mum and dad vowed to do anything and everything they could to help their precious daughter. For four years Libby and Joseph Lombardo searched the world and spent all their savings, but eventually found a radical new stem-cell treatment in Mexico. The prize it offered was the hope Isabella might walk for the first time. Then they faced the most difficult decision of all: should they put their faith – and their daughter’s life – in the hands of unknown doctors and untested science? ISIS bride, Aussie baby It would be easy to give Islam Mitat the coldest of shoulders, to ignore her despair and say we couldn’t care less about her. After all she was an ISIS bride, married to a British jihadi, and living at the front line of the war in Syria. And when, not surprisingly, her husband was killed in battle, she married an Australian ISIS fighter and had his baby. He too paid the ultimate price for his beliefs, leaving Islam with no choice but to make a daring and dangerous escape. Now, in an exclusive 60 MINUTES interview conducted in a secret North African location, she tells Tara Brown she was tricked into going to Syria in the first place. It’s a revelation that raises serious questions. Should we believe her? And what should become of this ISIS bride and her Aussie baby? The long paddock Unless you’ve had your head stuck in the non-existent clouds, you’d know large tracts of eastern Australia are in the iron grip of the nastiest drought in 50 years. The experts say if there isn’t rain soon it will become the worst drought since records were first kept. But while there has been a flood of stories about desperation and despair, Charles Wooley reckons it’s just as important to highlight the incredible resilience of the people on the land, despite these hardest of times. Way out beyond Tamworth in country New South Wales he met the wonderful Hourigan family, drovers who are moving 900 head of cattle along what is known as “the long paddock”.
Gamble of life
Soon after meeting and falling in love, Andrew and Olivia Densley agreed they both adored kids and wanted a large family. They got married and got on with their dream. But after having their fourth child they received terrible news. Their third child, a son, had a genetic immune deficiency disease which looked likely to kill him. Just when all seemed lost though, he was saved by a long-shot miracle. His little brother, the couple’s fourth child, was a match as a bone marrow donor. But as Tom Steinfort reports, at this point the story gets even more complicated. While Andrew and Olivia knew the substantial risks of having more children, it didn’t stop them. Olivia fell pregnant with a fifth child who was also born with the usually fatal disease. But having rolled the dice and lost, the couple refused to give up. It has taken several years and a hundred thousand dollars, but they’ve managed to engineer another extraordinary solution.
A magpie called Penguin
Somewhere, flying around the northern beaches of Sydney, is a magpie called Penguin who often thinks she’s a human. And if that’s not incredible enough, this amazing bird has another claim to fame – she’s a lifesaver. Penguin taught Sam Bloom, a mother of three, how to live again after she fell from a balcony, broke her back and became a paraplegic. It’s a truly inspiring tale that not surprisingly will also soon be a Hollywood movie

60 Minutes: Gamble of Life/A Magpie Called Penguin

News and current affairs

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs
48:40
Gamble of life Soon after meeting and falling in love, Andrew and Olivia Densley agreed they both adored kids and wanted a large family. They got married and got on with their dream. But after having their fourth child they received terrible news. Their third child, a son, had a genetic immune deficiency disease which looked likely to kill him. Just when all seemed lost though, he was saved by a long-shot miracle. His little brother, the couple’s fourth child, was a match as a bone marrow donor. But as Tom Steinfort reports, at this point the story gets even more complicated. While Andrew and Olivia knew the substantial risks of having more children, it didn’t stop them. Olivia fell pregnant with a fifth child who was also born with the usually fatal disease. But having rolled the dice and lost, the couple refused to give up. It has taken several years and a hundred thousand dollars, but they’ve managed to engineer another extraordinary solution. A magpie called Penguin Somewhere, flying around the northern beaches of Sydney, is a magpie called Penguin who often thinks she’s a human. And if that’s not incredible enough, this amazing bird has another claim to fame – she’s a lifesaver. Penguin taught Sam Bloom, a mother of three, how to live again after she fell from a balcony, broke her back and became a paraplegic. It’s a truly inspiring tale that not surprisingly will also soon be a Hollywood movie
The China Syndrome
It’s no secret that Australia’s relationship with China is as complicated as it is fragile. On the one hand, China is the key to our economic prosperity, so if we want to be rich we need to embrace the Chinese. On the other hand, there’s no question we have a fear of China’s expanding influence, and we don’t want them getting too close. Which is why what is happening in the South Pacific is causing growing concern. Somewhat arrogantly, Australia has always considered it our “patch of paradise” to protect and nurture. But now the Chinese are moving in and splashing their cash in places like Fiji and Vanuatu. So what’s next? Tom Steinfort investigates claims the Chinese may ultimately be planning to build military bases right on our doorstep.
Fake News
For millions of tourists visiting Australia the boomerang and the didgeridoo are iconic and highly sought after symbols of our indigenous culture. But unbelievably, most didgeridoos and boomerangs are now made in Indonesia, in Bali specifically, not here in Australia. It’s not because there’s a thriving expatriate Aboriginal community living up there, it’s all about money. Indonesian workers can churn out cheap copies of our artefacts by the shipload. And that’s very attractive for the businesses involved, which are happy to exploit or disrespect 40,000 years of culture in the pursuit of cashing in on gullible tourists.
Taken - Update
It is one of the most bizarre crimes 60 Minutes has ever encountered: the abduction last July of 20-year-old glamour model Chloe Ayling. She says she was snatched off a street in Milan and kept hostage in a remote Italian farmhouse while her kidnappers arranged to auction her off as a sex slave to the highest bidder. Chloe’s escape from this terrifying ordeal was so extraordinary that many accused her of making the whole story up – an elaborate publicity stunt for fame and fortune. Earlier this week a judge in an Italian court had his say, and as Liam Bartlett reports, the intrigue continues.

60 Minutes: China Syndrome/Fake News/Taken-Update

News and current affairs

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs
43:52
The China Syndrome It’s no secret that Australia’s relationship with China is as complicated as it is fragile. On the one hand, China is the key to our economic prosperity, so if we want to be rich we need to embrace the Chinese. On the other hand, there’s no question we have a fear of China’s expanding influence, and we don’t want them getting too close. Which is why what is happening in the South Pacific is causing growing concern. Somewhat arrogantly, Australia has always considered it our “patch of paradise” to protect and nurture. But now the Chinese are moving in and splashing their cash in places like Fiji and Vanuatu. So what’s next? Tom Steinfort investigates claims the Chinese may ultimately be planning to build military bases right on our doorstep. Fake News For millions of tourists visiting Australia the boomerang and the didgeridoo are iconic and highly sought after symbols of our indigenous culture. But unbelievably, most didgeridoos and boomerangs are now made in Indonesia, in Bali specifically, not here in Australia. It’s not because there’s a thriving expatriate Aboriginal community living up there, it’s all about money. Indonesian workers can churn out cheap copies of our artefacts by the shipload. And that’s very attractive for the businesses involved, which are happy to exploit or disrespect 40,000 years of culture in the pursuit of cashing in on gullible tourists. Taken - Update It is one of the most bizarre crimes 60 Minutes has ever encountered: the abduction last July of 20-year-old glamour model Chloe Ayling. She says she was snatched off a street in Milan and kept hostage in a remote Italian farmhouse while her kidnappers arranged to auction her off as a sex slave to the highest bidder. Chloe’s escape from this terrifying ordeal was so extraordinary that many accused her of making the whole story up – an elaborate publicity stunt for fame and fortune. Earlier this week a judge in an Italian court had his say, and as Liam Bartlett reports, the intrigue continues.
F for Fail
To the outside world they are highly respected, prestigious institutions committed to supporting young Australians as they embark on their journey through tertiary education. But behind the closed doors of many university residential colleges lurks a very different story. In March, Allison Langdon exposed disgusting initiation rituals, out-of-control drunken behaviour and most disturbingly, sexual assaults at colleges around the country. Following the broadcast of our story, “D for Disgrace” 60 Minutes was contacted by many more college residents, sick of the toxic culture which they say is fostered by a hierarchy of people who should know better. Now many students want change and they’re determined to fight for it. Their stories sent to 60 Minutes, along with supporting video and photographic evidence, will shock Australia. As one former college resident warns parents, “Do not send your children to college, because you have no control over what happens, and the atmosphere of secrecy stops you having any knowledge of what your child is going through.” Another tells Allison Langdon that when she raised an allegation of sexual assault with the management of her residential college she was told it was “all part of growing up”.
Wings over the world
To get the most out of their lives together, Glenn Singleman and Heather Swan go to extraordinary lengths. Or heights, to be more precise. Then, dressed in wingsuits, the couple jump out of planes and fly. They’ve soared over some amazing locations around the world and set multiple adventure records doing it. But there’s one place no one has ever flown in a wingsuit: Antarctica. So when Glenn and Heather told Liz Hayes of their dream to fly over the frozen continent, she thought it was mission impossible.

60 Minutes: F for Fail/Wings over the world

News and current affairs

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs
38:43
F for Fail To the outside world they are highly respected, prestigious institutions committed to supporting young Australians as they embark on their journey through tertiary education. But behind the closed doors of many university residential colleges lurks a very different story. In March, Allison Langdon exposed disgusting initiation rituals, out-of-control drunken behaviour and most disturbingly, sexual assaults at colleges around the country. Following the broadcast of our story, “D for Disgrace” 60 Minutes was contacted by many more college residents, sick of the toxic culture which they say is fostered by a hierarchy of people who should know better. Now many students want change and they’re determined to fight for it. Their stories sent to 60 Minutes, along with supporting video and photographic evidence, will shock Australia. As one former college resident warns parents, “Do not send your children to college, because you have no control over what happens, and the atmosphere of secrecy stops you having any knowledge of what your child is going through.” Another tells Allison Langdon that when she raised an allegation of sexual assault with the management of her residential college she was told it was “all part of growing up”. Wings over the world To get the most out of their lives together, Glenn Singleman and Heather Swan go to extraordinary lengths. Or heights, to be more precise. Then, dressed in wingsuits, the couple jump out of planes and fly. They’ve soared over some amazing locations around the world and set multiple adventure records doing it. But there’s one place no one has ever flown in a wingsuit: Antarctica. So when Glenn and Heather told Liz Hayes of their dream to fly over the frozen continent, she thought it was mission impossible.
The Teller
The regard which Australians have for banks has never been lower, and with the banking Royal Commission recommencing its public hearings on Monday, it will probably sink even further. Liz Hayes meets a very brave former bank worker who, through shame, feels compelled to speak out. For three decades Catherine was a teller. She says at first it was an honourable job, and she genuinely thought her role was to help the customers, but then the banks started putting profits before people - and her bosses made her do the same.
The dirty tricks Catherine reveals provide an alarming insight into the culture of Australian banking institutions.

The Holy Real Estate
The great prize in the battle for dominance between Israelis and Palestinians is Jerusalem. Ironically, its name means “city of peace”, but that’s something neither side seems to want. This week there were more protests, and more deaths, after the United States relocated its embassy to the holy city. The move recognises Jerusalem as the capital of the Jewish state and that enrages Palestinians like nothing else.

The Royal Wedding
Allison Langdon reports on the most anticipated wedding in years, and asks palace insiders where to now for the Royal newlyweds?
The week leading up to her wedding to Prince Harry is not what Meghan Markle ever would have expected – with her own family stealing the bride-to-be’s limelight. While it has been a stressful time for Ms Markle, there’s one thing Hollywood celebrities and the Royal Family both understand – the show must go on!

60 Minutes: May 20, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs
47:25
The Teller The regard which Australians have for banks has never been lower, and with the banking Royal Commission recommencing its public hearings on Monday, it will probably sink even further. Liz Hayes meets a very brave former bank worker who, through shame, feels compelled to speak out. For three decades Catherine was a teller. She says at first it was an honourable job, and she genuinely thought her role was to help the customers, but then the banks started putting profits before people - and her bosses made her do the same. The dirty tricks Catherine reveals provide an alarming insight into the culture of Australian banking institutions. The Holy Real Estate The great prize in the battle for dominance between Israelis and Palestinians is Jerusalem. Ironically, its name means “city of peace”, but that’s something neither side seems to want. This week there were more protests, and more deaths, after the United States relocated its embassy to the holy city. The move recognises Jerusalem as the capital of the Jewish state and that enrages Palestinians like nothing else. The Royal Wedding Allison Langdon reports on the most anticipated wedding in years, and asks palace insiders where to now for the Royal newlyweds? The week leading up to her wedding to Prince Harry is not what Meghan Markle ever would have expected – with her own family stealing the bride-to-be’s limelight. While it has been a stressful time for Ms Markle, there’s one thing Hollywood celebrities and the Royal Family both understand – the show must go on!
Striking a Nerve
There's no question that bullying is shameful behaviour that claims too many young Australian lives. What is terrifying is that the tormentors no longer leave their taunts in the schoolyard. Technology and social media let bullies follow their victims home. For parents, the dilemma is how to protect their children. Last month Mark Bladen decided to confront the teenager he thought was bullying his daughter. But what started as heated words became an ugly and violent scuffle. Liz Hayes reports the outrage that followed was not what many expected.

Pay Up
In 2018, is it too much to ask that women be paid the same amount as men for doing the same job? Tara Brown investigates the gender pay gap, tracking the issue to Iceland the first country in the world to achieve mandatory pay parity for men and women.

100 million Dollar Baby
Not too many 21-year-old men can boast a Ferrari in their garage and a pop star girlfriend by their side. But there are not too many 21-year-olds like Aussie Ben Simmons. In a very short time, he has made a big name in the lucrative sport of basketball. Playing in his first year with NBA team the Philadelphia 76ers, he's done so well that he's already being compared to legends of the game such as Magic Johnson and LeBron James. Now there's intense speculation that his next playing contract will earn him $100 million. But as Tom Steinfort discovered after spending several days with Ben, none of the attention is going to his head. As the youngest of six kids, Ben's very grounded family simply won't allow it.

60 Minutes: Striking a Nerve/Pay Up/100 million Dollar Baby

News and current affairs

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs
49:41
Striking a Nerve There's no question that bullying is shameful behaviour that claims too many young Australian lives. What is terrifying is that the tormentors no longer leave their taunts in the schoolyard. Technology and social media let bullies follow their victims home. For parents, the dilemma is how to protect their children. Last month Mark Bladen decided to confront the teenager he thought was bullying his daughter. But what started as heated words became an ugly and violent scuffle. Liz Hayes reports the outrage that followed was not what many expected. Pay Up In 2018, is it too much to ask that women be paid the same amount as men for doing the same job? Tara Brown investigates the gender pay gap, tracking the issue to Iceland the first country in the world to achieve mandatory pay parity for men and women. 100 million Dollar Baby Not too many 21-year-old men can boast a Ferrari in their garage and a pop star girlfriend by their side. But there are not too many 21-year-olds like Aussie Ben Simmons. In a very short time, he has made a big name in the lucrative sport of basketball. Playing in his first year with NBA team the Philadelphia 76ers, he's done so well that he's already being compared to legends of the game such as Magic Johnson and LeBron James. Now there's intense speculation that his next playing contract will earn him $100 million. But as Tom Steinfort discovered after spending several days with Ben, none of the attention is going to his head. As the youngest of six kids, Ben's very grounded family simply won't allow it.
Deadly Danger
The problem with the word influenza is its misappropriated meaning. We get a cough or cold and then wrongly moan that we've got the flu. It's a mistake which means we don't take the real flu seriously enough, even though last year it killed 1100 Australians and put another 30,000 in hospital. It's a deadly danger but there is some good news. On assignment for 60 Minutes, Karl Stefanovic reports how scientists are working on a super vaccine to beat the different and often mutating strains of the virus. It is hoped that the new vaccine will be much more effective and longer lasting than the current annual flu jab. In the meantime, Australians need to do all they can to avoid the flu.

On the Brink
There is no diplomatic way of saying it: Russia and the West are heading to war. Last week's US-led airstrikes on Syria infuriated Moscow. But last month the West was equally enraged at the attempted assassination of a former Russian spy in the UK, using a nerve agent. That incident caused farcical tit-for-tat expulsions of Russian and Western diplomats in nearly 30 countries. So far no leaders are willing to blink or back down, but they do want to be heard. Vladimir Putin's man in Canberra, ambassador Grigory Logvinov, warns that Australia's blind support of Russia's enemies is helping to bring the world closer to global nuclear conflict.

Being Barry
Forget housewife superstar Dame Edna Everage and cultural attache Sir Les Patterson, Barry Humphries has another extraordinary character to add to his act. Himself. After 60 years of revealing his genius through others, audiences will now get to know the real Barry Humphries. And in a career as successful as his there's plenty to know, including how his demons almost destroyed him. But as Barry tells Liz Hayes in a candid and sometimes naughty interview, nothing can beat his addiction to making people laugh.

60 Minutes: Deadly Danger/On the Brink/Being Barry

News and current affairs

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs
51:29
Deadly Danger The problem with the word influenza is its misappropriated meaning. We get a cough or cold and then wrongly moan that we've got the flu. It's a mistake which means we don't take the real flu seriously enough, even though last year it killed 1100 Australians and put another 30,000 in hospital. It's a deadly danger but there is some good news. On assignment for 60 Minutes, Karl Stefanovic reports how scientists are working on a super vaccine to beat the different and often mutating strains of the virus. It is hoped that the new vaccine will be much more effective and longer lasting than the current annual flu jab. In the meantime, Australians need to do all they can to avoid the flu. On the Brink There is no diplomatic way of saying it: Russia and the West are heading to war. Last week's US-led airstrikes on Syria infuriated Moscow. But last month the West was equally enraged at the attempted assassination of a former Russian spy in the UK, using a nerve agent. That incident caused farcical tit-for-tat expulsions of Russian and Western diplomats in nearly 30 countries. So far no leaders are willing to blink or back down, but they do want to be heard. Vladimir Putin's man in Canberra, ambassador Grigory Logvinov, warns that Australia's blind support of Russia's enemies is helping to bring the world closer to global nuclear conflict. Being Barry Forget housewife superstar Dame Edna Everage and cultural attache Sir Les Patterson, Barry Humphries has another extraordinary character to add to his act. Himself. After 60 years of revealing his genius through others, audiences will now get to know the real Barry Humphries. And in a career as successful as his there's plenty to know, including how his demons almost destroyed him. But as Barry tells Liz Hayes in a candid and sometimes naughty interview, nothing can beat his addiction to making people laugh.
The Surgeon and the Soldier
When Munjed Al Muderis fled war-torn Iraq, he escaped with just two things: a medical journal and the determination to start a new life. In the years since, he has put both to great use. After arriving in Australia as an illegal immigrant, associate professor Al Muderis is now one of the most skilled surgeons in the world. His expertise is in a revolutionary procedure called osseointegration, which fuses human bones with robotic limbs. On assignment for 60 Minutes, Mark Burrows reports on an operation this remarkable surgeon performs to rebuild the often-troubled soldiers who fought in conflict zones like his old homeland - good men such as US Army captain Luis Montalvan.

The Yorkshire Rose
At 91, Jack Crane should be enjoying a quiet life at his home in Lithgow, west of Sydney. Instead he has found himself at the centre of one of World War Two's most intriguing mysteries, the disappearance of an RAF Stirling bomber known as the Yorkshire Rose. In June 1944 the plane was flying a top-secret mission deep inside Nazi-occupied France when it vanished. There's been no trace of it, or the 23 servicemen on board, since. But with a lot of help, Jack thinks he now knows where the Yorkshire Rose is and he's fighting reluctant bureaucrats at the British Ministry of Defence, demanding they conduct a search. He desperately needs answers because his brother Bob was the pilot, and after three-quarters of a century, time is running out to bring this war hero home.

Going for Gold
This time last year Lauren Parker was one of Australia's most promising triathletes. Supremely fit, her life was an exciting blur of international competition and full-time training. Then she was involved in a dreadful, freakish accident that left her paralysed. Sadly, Lauren wasn't just broken physically and mentally - she could see no hope. But after months of misery something extraordinary happened. Next week she'll be going for gold at the Commonwealth Games. Peter Overton reports on Lauren's inspiring reinvention, and how some mighty help from an unlikely friend got a gifted athlete back on track.

You Can
On this holiday weekend Peter Overton also meets a beautiful young Australian for whom life has not been a holiday. Jess Van Zeil is fighting a brutal battle with melanoma, but incredibly, despite her illness, she says she's a lucky one. That's because she has been able to receive treatment at the newly established Melbourne You Can Centre, a facility specially designed by young cancer patients, for young cancer patients. Jess's story highlights the urgent need to close the gap in care that currently exists for those with cancer who are aged between 15 and 25.

60 Minutes: The Surgeon and the Soldier/The Yorkshire Rose/Going for Gold/You Can

News and current affairs

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs
50:10
The Surgeon and the Soldier When Munjed Al Muderis fled war-torn Iraq, he escaped with just two things: a medical journal and the determination to start a new life. In the years since, he has put both to great use. After arriving in Australia as an illegal immigrant, associate professor Al Muderis is now one of the most skilled surgeons in the world. His expertise is in a revolutionary procedure called osseointegration, which fuses human bones with robotic limbs. On assignment for 60 Minutes, Mark Burrows reports on an operation this remarkable surgeon performs to rebuild the often-troubled soldiers who fought in conflict zones like his old homeland - good men such as US Army captain Luis Montalvan. The Yorkshire Rose At 91, Jack Crane should be enjoying a quiet life at his home in Lithgow, west of Sydney. Instead he has found himself at the centre of one of World War Two's most intriguing mysteries, the disappearance of an RAF Stirling bomber known as the Yorkshire Rose. In June 1944 the plane was flying a top-secret mission deep inside Nazi-occupied France when it vanished. There's been no trace of it, or the 23 servicemen on board, since. But with a lot of help, Jack thinks he now knows where the Yorkshire Rose is and he's fighting reluctant bureaucrats at the British Ministry of Defence, demanding they conduct a search. He desperately needs answers because his brother Bob was the pilot, and after three-quarters of a century, time is running out to bring this war hero home. Going for Gold This time last year Lauren Parker was one of Australia's most promising triathletes. Supremely fit, her life was an exciting blur of international competition and full-time training. Then she was involved in a dreadful, freakish accident that left her paralysed. Sadly, Lauren wasn't just broken physically and mentally - she could see no hope. But after months of misery something extraordinary happened. Next week she'll be going for gold at the Commonwealth Games. Peter Overton reports on Lauren's inspiring reinvention, and how some mighty help from an unlikely friend got a gifted athlete back on track. You Can On this holiday weekend Peter Overton also meets a beautiful young Australian for whom life has not been a holiday. Jess Van Zeil is fighting a brutal battle with melanoma, but incredibly, despite her illness, she says she's a lucky one. That's because she has been able to receive treatment at the newly established Melbourne You Can Centre, a facility specially designed by young cancer patients, for young cancer patients. Jess's story highlights the urgent need to close the gap in care that currently exists for those with cancer who are aged between 15 and 25.
Enough
This weekend many cities in the US will be taken over by teenagers, fed up with the way adults are running their country. The nationwide protests are to demand tougher gun controls. What's significant - and impressive - is that these rallies are being organised and led by the very students who last month endured the horror of seeing their own classmates gunned down at the Stoneman Douglas High School in Florida. Their simple message is getting louder by the day: enough is enough. And as Tom Steinfort reports, the students also have a very unlikely ally. Evan Ramsey is a convicted school shooter who is now spending the rest of his life in prison, regretting his moment of madness.

Help Us Before It's Too Late
It's difficult to imagine a more desperate situation or a more desperate mother. For 33 years Yvette Nichol did her very best to look after and raise her intellectually disabled son. But as they both got older, she needed to know he'd be cared for when she was gone. Try as she might to get help, it never came, so fearing he had no reasonable future, Yvette did something shocking and deeply troubling. She attempted to kill her child and herself. In a remarkably candid interview with Liz Hayes, Yvette explains what drove her to the brink, and how her drastic action has exposed a shameful truth about the ongoing care of disabled Australians.

Golden Girl
Although it seems as if she's been around for as long as anyone can remember, surely it cannot be true that Kylie Minogue is about to turn 50. For most of us, this showbiz idol is ageless, or at least perpetually twentysomething. And even more enviably, her career - in TV, movies and song - continues to flourish. It's little wonder Kylie's new album is called Golden. But in an exclusive interview with Karl Stefanovic, on assignment for 60 Minutes, Kylie reveals the pain of her recent broken engagement and talks about reports that it led to a nervous breakdown.

60 Minutes: Enough/Help Us Before It's Too Late/Golden Girl

News and current affairs

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs
47:40
Enough This weekend many cities in the US will be taken over by teenagers, fed up with the way adults are running their country. The nationwide protests are to demand tougher gun controls. What's significant - and impressive - is that these rallies are being organised and led by the very students who last month endured the horror of seeing their own classmates gunned down at the Stoneman Douglas High School in Florida. Their simple message is getting louder by the day: enough is enough. And as Tom Steinfort reports, the students also have a very unlikely ally. Evan Ramsey is a convicted school shooter who is now spending the rest of his life in prison, regretting his moment of madness. Help Us Before It's Too Late It's difficult to imagine a more desperate situation or a more desperate mother. For 33 years Yvette Nichol did her very best to look after and raise her intellectually disabled son. But as they both got older, she needed to know he'd be cared for when she was gone. Try as she might to get help, it never came, so fearing he had no reasonable future, Yvette did something shocking and deeply troubling. She attempted to kill her child and herself. In a remarkably candid interview with Liz Hayes, Yvette explains what drove her to the brink, and how her drastic action has exposed a shameful truth about the ongoing care of disabled Australians. Golden Girl Although it seems as if she's been around for as long as anyone can remember, surely it cannot be true that Kylie Minogue is about to turn 50. For most of us, this showbiz idol is ageless, or at least perpetually twentysomething. And even more enviably, her career - in TV, movies and song - continues to flourish. It's little wonder Kylie's new album is called Golden. But in an exclusive interview with Karl Stefanovic, on assignment for 60 Minutes, Kylie reveals the pain of her recent broken engagement and talks about reports that it led to a nervous breakdown.
How do you keep people safe from dog attacks?
The death of a toddler last month has reignited the debate about how to keep people safe from dogs. The RSPCA says training and education is the answer, but others want aggressive dogs banned.
 
Laura Tingle on the $4.5bn extra funding for Catholic and independent schools
Prime Minister Scott Morrison has announced $4.5 billion in extra funding for Catholic and independent schools.
 
Behind the lens of Parliament's prize photographer
This year, for the first time in history, the press gallery journalist of the year award went to a photographer, Alex Ellinghausen. He works for the Sydney Morning Herald and The Age, and while you may not know his name the chances are you'll recognise his work - capturing politicians at their best, their worst and their most vulnerable.
 
The battle for control of powerlifting in Australia
Parliament house isn't the only place where you'll find politics. Pretty much any organisation, no matter how big or small, will at some stage become captive to people jockeying for power. The sport of powerlifting in Australia is a case in point, with two local federations vying for control - and the athletes caught in the middle.
 
Roadies, a look at life on the road
Behind every world-conquering band is a road crew that transports them from gig to gig, ensures they look and sound amazing, and literally works around the clock to keep the show on the road. Music writer Stuart Coupe's latest book, Roadies – The Secret History of Australian Rock'n'Roll, is a fascinating look at the often hidden side of the music business.

7.30: September 20, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
31:53
How do you keep people safe from dog attacks? The death of a toddler last month has reignited the debate about how to keep people safe from dogs. The RSPCA says training and education is the answer, but others want aggressive dogs banned. Laura Tingle on the $4.5bn extra funding for Catholic and independent schools Prime Minister Scott Morrison has announced $4.5 billion in extra funding for Catholic and independent schools. Behind the lens of Parliament's prize photographer This year, for the first time in history, the press gallery journalist of the year award went to a photographer, Alex Ellinghausen. He works for the Sydney Morning Herald and The Age, and while you may not know his name the chances are you'll recognise his work - capturing politicians at their best, their worst and their most vulnerable. The battle for control of powerlifting in Australia Parliament house isn't the only place where you'll find politics. Pretty much any organisation, no matter how big or small, will at some stage become captive to people jockeying for power. The sport of powerlifting in Australia is a case in point, with two local federations vying for control - and the athletes caught in the middle. Roadies, a look at life on the road Behind every world-conquering band is a road crew that transports them from gig to gig, ensures they look and sound amazing, and literally works around the clock to keep the show on the road. Music writer Stuart Coupe's latest book, Roadies – The Secret History of Australian Rock'n'Roll, is a fascinating look at the often hidden side of the music business.
Authorities fear copy-cat tampering in fruit contamination disaster
Since the story strawberry tampering broke more than 100 reports of contaminated fruit have been made around the country, sparking fears of copy-cat tampering. Authorities are scrambling to manage this slow-moving disaster as they try to limit the damage to an industry worth almost half a billion dollars.
 
Why are female Liberal MPs quitting Federal politics?
A number of female Liberal MPs have spoken out against internal party dynamics, while also announcing they won’t recontest the next election. But Prime Minister Scott Morrison insisting there is not a behaviour problem in Canberra.
 
Christian Porter discusses strawberry tampering and sexism in politics
Federal Attorney General, Christian Porter, talks to 7.30 about news laws introduced to counter the growing strawberry tampering crisis, and whether the Liberal Party has a problem with women.
 
Marine archaeologists may have discovered the wreck of the Endeavour
Historian David Hunt explains why the discovery of Capt. James Cook's ship, HMS Endeavour, would be an important moment in Australia's history.
 
Meet Alec Knight, the first Australian male to join the New York City Ballet
Alec Knight was just 17 when he moved to New York after being offered a coveted apprenticeship with the New York City Ballet. That was five years ago. Now he's the first Australian male to be given a contract with the prestigious ballet company.

7.30: September 19, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
30:05
Authorities fear copy-cat tampering in fruit contamination disaster Since the story strawberry tampering broke more than 100 reports of contaminated fruit have been made around the country, sparking fears of copy-cat tampering. Authorities are scrambling to manage this slow-moving disaster as they try to limit the damage to an industry worth almost half a billion dollars. Why are female Liberal MPs quitting Federal politics? A number of female Liberal MPs have spoken out against internal party dynamics, while also announcing they won’t recontest the next election. But Prime Minister Scott Morrison insisting there is not a behaviour problem in Canberra. Christian Porter discusses strawberry tampering and sexism in politics Federal Attorney General, Christian Porter, talks to 7.30 about news laws introduced to counter the growing strawberry tampering crisis, and whether the Liberal Party has a problem with women. Marine archaeologists may have discovered the wreck of the Endeavour Historian David Hunt explains why the discovery of Capt. James Cook's ship, HMS Endeavour, would be an important moment in Australia's history. Meet Alec Knight, the first Australian male to join the New York City Ballet Alec Knight was just 17 when he moved to New York after being offered a coveted apprenticeship with the New York City Ballet. That was five years ago. Now he's the first Australian male to be given a contract with the prestigious ballet company.
Loading...