#YesAllMen
26:27

#YesAllMen

SBS November 20, 2018

News and current affairs

Personal and social capability

9-10
11-12
Classification: Not ClassifiedClassification: Not Classified
Is masculinity killing Aussie men? They drink more, smoke more, do more drugs, deal more drugs and die younger. Men get bashed, robbed and murdered more - mostly by other men. ...

Is masculinity killing Aussie men? They drink more, smoke more, do more drugs, deal more drugs and die younger. Men get bashed, robbed and murdered more - mostly by other men. The program asks why.

2015 Year In Review
29:59

2015 Year In Review

Episode 1 ABC January 3, 2016

News and current affairs

9-10
11-12
Classification: Not ClassifiedClassification: Not Classified
This video has closed captioning
ABC News takes a look back at the events and stories that shaped 2015.

ABC News takes a look back at the events and stories that shaped 2015.

2015 Year In Review
27:20

2015 Year In Review

Episode 2 ABC January 9, 2016

News and current affairs

9-10
11-12
Classification: Not ClassifiedClassification: Not Classified
This video has closed captioning
A look back at some of the major stories of the year.

A look back at some of the major stories of the year.

50 Years of BTN: The World Through a Classroom TV
29:32

50 Years of BTN: The World Through a Classroom TV

ABC June 5, 2018

News and current affairs

3-4
5-6
Classification: Not ClassifiedClassification: Not Classified
This video has closed captioning
Behind The News (BTN) is celebrating its 50th anniversary, and to mark the milestone we take a stroll down memory lane with a documentary looking back at the history of the show.

Behind The News (BTN) is celebrating its 50th anniversary, and to mark the milestone we take a stroll down memory lane with a documentary looking back at the history of the show.

50 Years of Four Corners
52:46

50 Years of Four Corners

ABC August 22, 2011

News and current affairs

Civics and citizenship

11-12
Classification: Not ClassifiedClassification: Not Classified
This video has closed captioning
Four Corners celebrate 50 years on air with a special program that highlights the power and the passion of television current affairs journalism. Over five decades, Four ...

Four Corners celebrate 50 years on air with a special program that highlights the power and the passion of television current affairs journalism. Over five decades, Four Corners has created and defined the major stories at the centre of Australian public life.

50 Years Of Four Corners
58:40

50 Years Of Four Corners: Your Stories, Our History - Out Of Sight Out Of Mind

ABC NEWS 24 August 28, 2011

News and current affairs

Civics and citizenship

11-12
Classification: Not ClassifiedClassification: Not Classified
This video has closed captioning
As part of the 50 Years of Four Corners celebrations, a report from 1969 investigating a case of Aboriginal injustice. Peter Reid reported on the case of Nancy Young, wrongly ...

As part of the 50 Years of Four Corners celebrations, a report from 1969 investigating a case of Aboriginal injustice. Peter Reid reported on the case of Nancy Young, wrongly jailed for manslaughter after the death of her baby.

50 Years Of Four Corners
49:20

50 Years Of Four Corners: Your Stories, Our History - Whitlam On The Campaign Trail/Fraser On The Campaign Trail

ABC NEWS 24 September 4, 2011

News and current affairs

Civics and citizenship

11-12
Classification: Not ClassifiedClassification: Not Classified
This video has closed captioning
As part of the 50 Years Four Corners celebrations, ABC News 24 will air selected programs from each decade over five weeks. This week, a look back at the 1970s with two ...

As part of the 50 Years Four Corners celebrations, ABC News 24 will air selected programs from each decade over five weeks. This week, a look back at the 1970s with two reports that followed the campaign trails of the Whitlam camp and the Fraser camp leading up to the controversial 1975 Federal Election.

50 Years Of Four Corners
59:26

50 Years Of Four Corners: Your Stories, Our History - The Moonlight State

ABC September 18, 2011

News and current affairs

Civics and citizenship

11-12
Classification: Not ClassifiedClassification: Not Classified
This video has closed captioning
Tonight we revisit the 1990s with David Marr's moving profile of Stuart Challender, the Sydney Symphony Orchestra conductor who was battling AIDS. The program documented the ...

Tonight we revisit the 1990s with David Marr's moving profile of Stuart Challender, the Sydney Symphony Orchestra conductor who was battling AIDS. The program documented the life of an enormously gifted individual, who was privately coming to terms with his sexuality and an illness which eventually took his life.

50 Years Of Four Corners
44:59

50 Years Of Four Corners: Your Stories, Our History - The Big Finish

ABC NEWS 24 September 25, 2011

News and current affairs

Civics and citizenship

11-12
Classification: Not ClassifiedClassification: Not Classified
This video has closed captioning
Tonight we revisit the 1990s with David Marr's moving profile of Stuart Challender, the Sydney Symphony Orchestra conductor who was battling AIDS. The program documented the ...

Tonight we revisit the 1990s with David Marr's moving profile of Stuart Challender, the Sydney Symphony Orchestra conductor who was battling AIDS. The program documented the life of an enormously gifted individual, who was privately coming to terms with his sexuality and an illness which eventually took his life.

50 Years Of Four Corners
43:34

50 Years Of Four Corners: Your Stories, Our History - The Bali Confessions

ABC October 2, 2011

News and current affairs

Civics and citizenship

11-12
Classification: Not ClassifiedClassification: Not Classified
This video has closed captioning
Tonight we revisit the 1990s with David Marr's moving profile of Stuart Challender, the Sydney Symphony Orchestra conductor who was battling AIDS. The program documented the ...

Tonight we revisit the 1990s with David Marr's moving profile of Stuart Challender, the Sydney Symphony Orchestra conductor who was battling AIDS. The program documented the life of an enormously gifted individual, who was privately coming to terms with his sexuality and an illness which eventually took his life.

50 Years Of Four Corners
55:43

50 Years Of Four Corners: Your Stories, Our History - Utah

ABC December 10, 2011

News and current affairs

Civics and citizenship

11-12
Classification: Not ClassifiedClassification: Not Classified
This video has closed captioning
Tonight we revisit the 1990s with David Marr's moving profile of Stuart Challender, the Sydney Symphony Orchestra conductor who was battling AIDS. The program documented the ...

Tonight we revisit the 1990s with David Marr's moving profile of Stuart Challender, the Sydney Symphony Orchestra conductor who was battling AIDS. The program documented the life of an enormously gifted individual, who was privately coming to terms with his sexuality and an illness which eventually took his life.

50 Years Of Four Corners
49:08

50 Years Of Four Corners: Your Stories, Our History - Blue Death

ABC December 17, 2011

News and current affairs

Civics and citizenship

11-12
Classification: Not ClassifiedClassification: Not Classified
This video has closed captioning
Tonight we revisit the 1990s with David Marr's moving profile of Stuart Challender, the Sydney Symphony Orchestra conductor who was battling AIDS. The program documented the ...

Tonight we revisit the 1990s with David Marr's moving profile of Stuart Challender, the Sydney Symphony Orchestra conductor who was battling AIDS. The program documented the life of an enormously gifted individual, who was privately coming to terms with his sexuality and an illness which eventually took his life.

60 Minutes
50:58

60 Minutes: What Happens in Vegas/The Killer Downstairs

Nine July 24, 2016

News and current affairs

9-10
11-12
Classification: Not ClassifiedClassification: Not Classified
WHAT HAPPENS IN VEGAS That memorable tourist slogan "What happens in Vegas stays in Vegas" is particularly apt for Human Nature. You remember Human Nature? The Australian boy ...

WHAT HAPPENS IN VEGAS That memorable tourist slogan "What happens in Vegas stays in Vegas" is particularly apt for Human Nature. You remember Human Nature? The Australian boy band of the 1990s, four high school mates with a passion for pop harmonies. Well, the boys became men, and in 2009 Toby Allen, Phil Burton and brothers, Andrew and Mike Tierney, decided to chance their luck in the toughest entertainment town in the world, Las Vegas. For their first show they sold eight tickets, but now, seven years on, they sell out every performance, and by staying in Vegas, Human Nature are transforming "sin city" into "sing city". THE KILLER DOWNSTAIRS Sometimes greed is so consuming it blocks out all human reasoning and logic. How else can anyone explain Adeel Khan's actions? Two years ago, Khan, 46, deliberately blew up his Sydney convenience store so he could claim $225,000 in insurance. The blast was so destructive the two-storey building crumbled to the ground and three innocent lives, including an 11-month-old baby, were lost. That Adeel Khan thought he could get away with the crime is as outrageous as the act itself, and next week this evil man will be sentenced for murder, manslaughter and arson. But no amount of prison time will be long enough for the grieving families of those he killed.

60 Minutes
49:18

60 Minutes: Wedding Of The Century/Lord Of The Web/A Deadly Secret

Nine April 10, 2011

News and current affairs

9-10
11-12
Classification: Not ClassifiedClassification: Not Classified
This video has closed captioning
The story, 'Wedding of the century', discusses the upcoming wedding of Prince William and Kate Middleton. The story, 'Lord of the web', features an interview with Facebook ...

The story, 'Wedding of the century', discusses the upcoming wedding of Prince William and Kate Middleton. The story, 'Lord of the web', features an interview with Facebook CEO, Mark Zuckerberg. The story, 'A deadly secret', investigates the mysterious circumstances surrounding the two girlfriends of NSW farmer Robert Geeves.

60 Minutes
51:58

60 Minutes: Diana's Secrets/Lorde Knows/Death Of A Champ

Nine June 18, 2017

News and current affairs

9-10
11-12
Classification: Not ClassifiedClassification: Not Classified
This video has closed captioning
Diana's Secrets When Diana, the Princess of Wales, died in a car crash in a Paris city tunnel 20 years ago the world could barely believe it. She had been one of the most ...

Diana's Secrets When Diana, the Princess of Wales, died in a car crash in a Paris city tunnel 20 years ago the world could barely believe it. She had been one of the most adored women of the 20th century, the young girl who'd grown up and married her prince, the heir to the throne, in a fairytale romance. Sadly, the fairytale was just that, a myth. Despite intense scrutiny and speculation, the reality was a story no-one wanted to believe until Diana told journalist and author Andrew Moreton the secrets of her miserable existence; the reasons for her failed marriage and her heartbreaking attempts to end her life. Moreton's book was a jaw-dropping expose that changed the palace forever. Now 25 years later Liz Hayes discovers there's even more to this story - an intriguing spy tale worthy of its own book. There are revelations about secret tape recordings and clandestine meetings that will once again captivate Lorde Knows Just a few short years ago, Lorde was a shy and awkward schoolgirl in New Zealand. Then she wrote and recorded the song Royals, which she gave away free to anyone who wanted it. It was either an act of great generosity or masterful marketing, but probably both. Almost instantly the then 16-year-old transformed herself into a pop princess. Her unique voice and extraordinary songwriting ability catapulted her to music stardom. Now, four years later, there's a second coming. Lorde is back with new music and a highly anticipated - and applauded - new album. And as Allison Langdon discovered, she's as intelligent, quirky and wonderful as ever. Death Of A Champ If ever there was an example of why the sport of boxing has so many critics demanding it should be banned, then the tragedy of professional boxer Davey Browne is surely it. Two years ago Browne was in a Sydney boxing ring, literally fighting for his life. He lost, dying at just 28 years of age. This week, the NSW Coroner will hand down findings into the circumstances that allowed the young champion to be beaten to death in a supposedly properly regulated and fully sanctioned international bout. The question is why didn't boxing officials step in to stop the fight? It's something Browne's family - most of whom watched him die - desperately need answered.

60 Minutes
53:20

60 Minutes: A Day In The Life: Paul McCartney/The Talking Dead/The Great Divide

Nine June 25, 2017

News and current affairs

9-10
11-12
Classification: Not ClassifiedClassification: Not Classified
This video has closed captioning
A Day In The Life: Paul McCartney This year marks the 50th anniversary of the release of the Beatles' Sgt Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band. It's the musical masterpiece many ...

A Day In The Life: Paul McCartney This year marks the 50th anniversary of the release of the Beatles' Sgt Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band. It's the musical masterpiece many consider the greatest rock 'n' roll album ever made. For Paul McCartney that's not a bad achievement in a career overflowing with accolades and accomplishments. With the Beatles, Wings and as a solo artist, McCartney has sold more than 700 million albums and won so many awards he can barely remember them. His contribution to music has also been recognised with a knighthood. Sir Paul has just celebrated his 75th birthday but has no plans to slow down - instead he's now got Australia in his sights. The Talking Dead Twelve months ago, crime fighters in Australia got a brand-new weapon. It's a little gruesome so it's hidden away in a secret location in the Blue Mountains west of Sydney, but already it is helping police solve murders and missing person cases. It's Australia's first body farm. That's right, a final, very exposed resting place for some of those very generous people who agree to donate themselves to science when they die. In America body farms have proven a vital forensic tool, where investigators are able to study rates of human decomposition. As Peter Stefanovic discovers, listening to the talking dead is a confronting, but also intriguing, experience. The Great Divide In 1967, Israel defeated its Arab neighbours and rewrote the map of the Middle East in the so-called Six Day War. Since then Palestinians on the West Bank have been forced to live under Israeli occupation and control. What infuriates them even more is Israel's policy of building Jewish settlements on what they consider to be their land. The result of this ongoing and highly provocative act is more hate, more violence, and more death. Not surprisingly it is also breeding new generations of Israelis and Palestinians for whom the word peace is anathema.

60 Minutes
48:33

60 Minutes: Patient 71/Work Till You Drop/Chicago Without Hope

Nine July 2, 2017

News and current affairs

9-10
11-12
Classification: Not ClassifiedClassification: Not Classified
This video has closed captioning
Patient 71 Five years ago Julie Randall was told she was going to die. No ifs, no buts. Doctors not only said she had melanoma, but that the cancer had spread throughout her ...

Patient 71 Five years ago Julie Randall was told she was going to die. No ifs, no buts. Doctors not only said she had melanoma, but that the cancer had spread throughout her body. They said it was incurable and she'd be lucky if she survived the next nine months. But instead of despairing, Julie did something incredible. She made a promise to her family that she wouldn't die. Then she did something even more amazing. Through sheer determination - and with time quickly running out - she forced her way onto an experimental drug trial in the US. There had only been space for 70, until Julie became patient 71. This, however, was just the beginning of Julie Randall's inspiring battle for survival. Work Till You Drop While he doesn't look it or feel it, Charles Wooley is nudging 70. It's led him to some serious introspection about his existence, and even more sombrely, contemplation of the "R" word. No, he still loves reporting for 60 Minutes, but shouldn't he have retired at 65? Shouldn't his constant companion these days be a fishing rod instead of a typewriter? But as Wooley discovers, retirement is a word most Australians can no longer afford to dream about. The more likely reality, as former federal treasurer Peter Costello - who is now Wooley's boss at Nine - has been warning us about for more than two decades, is that we'll have to work until we drop. Chicago Without Hope Imagine living in a place where every two hours someone is shot, and every 14 hours someone is murdered. It isn't Iraq or Afghanistan, but one of the biggest and most sophisticated cities in the world: Chicago. On the city's south side, which is considered the heart of black America, gang rivalry is tearing its people apart. It has become so brutal that both police and the perpetrators agree this urban warfare is out of control. Liz Hayes ventures into what is now dubbed Chiraq to meet the people who are fighting for survival on the frontline.

60 Minutes
46:09

60 Minutes: The Unthinkable/Apocalypse Soon/Goat Rush

Nine July 9, 2017

News and current affairs

9-10
11-12
Classification: Not ClassifiedClassification: Not Classified
This video has closed captioning
The Unthinkable This Sunday marks a desperately sad anniversary for Ralph and Kathy Kelly. It will be five years since their beautiful 18-year-old son Thomas died after being ...

The Unthinkable This Sunday marks a desperately sad anniversary for Ralph and Kathy Kelly. It will be five years since their beautiful 18-year-old son Thomas died after being punched in a coward attack. For the Kellys, it's been five years of turmoil and trauma. After the horror of their son's death, Ralph and Kathy wanted some good to happen so they campaigned to change drinking laws in Sydney. There was an immediate and dramatic reduction in alcohol-fuelled violence. But not everyone agreed with the new regulations and the family found themselves a target for sustained and cruel abuse. Then last year, their other son, Stuart, Thomas's little brother, died by suicide. Once again they were forced to make sense of the unthinkable. On 60 Minutes, Ralph and Kathy Kelly speak publicly about their loss for the first time and tell Allison Langdon how they firmly believe that had Thomas not been killed, Stuart would still be alive. For the Kelly family the ripple effect of "one punch" goes on but their courage is as remarkable as their resolve to continue helping others. And with the help of the National Rugby League, they are doing just that. Apocalypse Soon Here's some bad news and some good news. First the bad: the Doomsday Clock is currently set at two and a half minutes to midnight, which is the closest the world has been to monumental catastrophe for the last 64 years. We can thank nuclear weapons, climate change, North Korea and Donald Trump for that scary scenario. But the good news is that it's not too late to protect yourself against the looming threats, and there are plenty of so-called "doomsday preppers" doing just that. They are building extraordinary bunkers and bolt-holes, and filling them up with everything they need to withstand the disintegration of civilisation. But as he glimpses the end of the world, Peter Stefanovic discovers there's even some more bad news: the cost of survival doesn't come cheap. Goat Rush It was only a few years ago that out beyond the back of Bourke goats were considered nothing more than a blight on the landscape, the worst kind of feral pest. But in an inspired reversal of fortune the Billy goat has become King Billy. Soaring prices for goat meat mean clever farmers have been turning a problem into profit, and Australia has become the world's largest exporter of the product. The delicious irony though is that despite saving their bacon, most farmers can't stomach the thought of eating goat. They have remained steadfast beef and mutton men. That is until Charles Wooley introduced them to celebrity chef, Luke Mangan.