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Insight
52:36

Insight: Gassy Coonamble

Season 1 Episode 16 SBS May 29, 2018

News and current affairs

Intercultural understanding

9-10
11-12
Classification: Not Classified Classification: Not Classified
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Jenny Brockie takes a look at what happens when coal seam gas comes to town. Steven Jones, a Narrabri local of 35 years, lives on 800 acres near the NSW Pilliga Forest. Part ...

Jenny Brockie takes a look at what happens when coal seam gas comes to town. Steven Jones, a Narrabri local of 35 years, lives on 800 acres near the NSW Pilliga Forest. Part of his property falls within the boundaries of a proposed coal seam gas drilling area. After living next door to exploration gas wells, he says he would be happy to have the wells on his property and doesn’t have any concerns with this type of resource being developed in the region. “As long as the government keeps an eye on it to make sure they don’t do wrong…I’m 100 per cent for them.” But some Narrabri locals are less certain. Jon-Maree wouldn’t be happy to have the wells on her land out of concern about the potential environmental effects, in particular the risk to the region’s water supply. “I think it's really important to understand that a rural property, without water, is nothing. Without water our communities don't function.” That’s a concern shared by many vocal opponents from Coonamble, a small rural town, almost 200km from the proposed project area. Adam and Rowena Macrae are farmers who have poured money into their almost 4,000 acre property. Part of a 461km pipeline, that will transport the gas from the project to the NSW market, is slated to be built under their land. They feel there is too much uncertainty around the project and its associated infrastructure. “I think that the risks are too high and we're not prepared to take those risks with our family.” Gas company Santos has overseen exploration in the area in recent years and says these wells could provide up to 50 per cent of NSW’s gas needs. Last year, Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull urged the NSW Government to approve the Narrabri Gas Project. But local opinion about the project is divided. More than 23,000 submissions were received by the NSW Department of Planning, making it the most protested project in the history of the department. With a looming domestic gas shortage on the horizon and the region awaiting to hear whether the project gets given the green light by the NSW Government, a special edition of Insight travels to Narrabri to hear from those who may be affected by the project and its infrastructure.

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Insight
51:52

Insight: To Have and Withhold

Season 1 Episode 30 SBS June 4, 2019

News and current affairs

Intercultural understanding

9-10
11-12
Classification: Not Classified Classification: Not Classified
When Fidan Shevket started dating her boyfriend, she wouldn’t let him leave a toothbrush at her Sydney apartment. She was worried it could be used as evidence of a de facto ...

When Fidan Shevket started dating her boyfriend, she wouldn’t let him leave a toothbrush at her Sydney apartment. She was worried it could be used as evidence of a de facto relationship, which could give him claim to part of her home if they ever broke up. “If we're ever going to move in together, if we're ever going to get married, if we're ever going to do anything to make this relationship go to the next level - then I absolutely want a [prenup],” Fidan tells Insight’s Jenny Brockie. Fidan has been a family lawyer for 15 years and has seen how bitter break-ups can get, especially when it comes to the division of assets. So, after two and a half years with her boyfriend, she is writing up what she calls “the greatest [prenup] ever drafted.” When Kathy Robinson met her now husband, Cam Robinson, money was tight. She had four children and had just come out of a difficult break-up. She was left with the family home, a big mortgage and a little in the way of savings. Cam, who was single with no children and owned multiple properties, had far more in assets than Kathy – so a discussion about getting a prenup arose early in the relationship. But the couple quickly decided it wasn’t for them. “Going into a relationship you have to have trust,” Kathy says. “If you can’t trust your partner, then who can you trust really?” Family lawyer, Jodylee Bartal, writes prenups for her clients and says they are no longer just the domain of the rich and famous. But often certain clauses she gets asked to include in a prenup aren’t legally binding, and putting too much detail into prenups can increase the risk of the Family Court voiding the agreement. Family lawyer, Kasey Fox, recently signed a prenup with her fiancé, Travis Goode. They decided against putting this kind of detail into their agreement. “I actually think it can be dangerous to put too much of that detail in about what's going to happen during the relationship, because the whole idea of one of these agreements is that they only come into effect if you separate,” she says. For all of Fidan’s efforts, her boyfriend has not yet signed the prenup. “If he doesn't sign, I've been very clear on this: if he doesn't sign it there's big trouble, meaning the relationship will probably come to an end – almost definitely, it will come to an end.”

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