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7.30
33:13

7.30: April 26, 2016

ABC April 26, 2016

News and current affairs

11-12
Classification: Not Classified Classification: Not Classified
Stories include, 'Interview: Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull', 'French company DCNS wins Australia's $50b submarine contract', 'Black Comedy star Nakkiah Lui on how humour is ...

Stories include, 'Interview: Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull', 'French company DCNS wins Australia's $50b submarine contract', 'Black Comedy star Nakkiah Lui on how humour is sparking fresh thinking on Indigenous issues' and 'PNG Supreme Court finds the detention of asylum seekers on Manus Island is illegal'. INTERVIEW: PRIME MINISTER MALCOLM TURNBULL Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull speaks with Leigh Sales. FRENCH COMPANY DCNS WINS AUSTRALIA'S $50B SUBMARINE CONTRACT Australia's largest defence project contract in history has been won by French company, DCNS. The much anticipated $50 billion contract ensures the 12 new submarines will be built at Adelaide's Osborne shipyards. BLACK COMEDY STAR NAKKIAH LUI ON HOW HUMOUR IS SPARKING FRESH THINKING ON INDIGENOUS ISSUES One of the stars of the ABC's Aboriginal sketch comedy series, Black Comedy, is the multitalented Nakkiah Lui. The former law student is also an award winning playwright and writer and a passionate advocate for the rights of Indigenous Australians. PNG SUPREME COURT FINDS THE DETENTION OF ASYLUM SEEKERS ON MANUS ISLAND IS ILLEGAL The MP for Manus Island, Ronnie Knight, says the court ruling finding Papua New Guinea's detention of asylum seekers illegal was an inevitable decision.

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The Lost Tapes
51:10

The Lost Tapes: LA Riots

Season 1 Episode 2 The History Channel September 25, 2018

Modern history

History

11-12
Classification: Mature Classification: Mature
On the afternoon of April 29, 1992, the powder keg that was the city of Los Angeles, exploded. A jury in the all-white community of Simi Valley had just found four white LAPD ...

On the afternoon of April 29, 1992, the powder keg that was the city of Los Angeles, exploded. A jury in the all-white community of Simi Valley had just found four white LAPD officers not guilty in the brutal, videotaped beating of an African American taxi driver named Rodney King. Roiling resentment against the police, which under Chief Daryl Gates had an "us against them" mentality, turned the City of Angeles into a war zone. In South Central, motorists were pulled from their vehicles and beaten. Television viewers saw one white man, Reginald Denny, pulled from his tractor trailer, beaten to a pulp and then witnessed a rioter slam a huge cinder block into the Denny's head while he lay helpless on the ground. The LA riots had begun. For six days the city was under siege, taken over mostly by thugs who used the King verdict as an excuse to run rampant. Stores were looted. Korean shop owners armed themselves and shot anyone who tried to storm their stores. Hundreds of fires burned for days, making LA resemble the oil fields of Iraq when Saddam Hussein's fleeing troops set alight oil wells in the desert. Police abandoned entire neighbourhoods, instead trying to protect upscale enclaves like West Hollywood and Beverly Hills. Daryl Gates said during a press conference "Let it burn". Long standing scores between gangs, neighbours and anyone with a grudge were violently settled.

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