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60 Minutes
43:52

60 Minutes: China Syndrome/Fake News/Taken-Update

Nine June 17, 2018

News and current affairs

9-10
11-12
Classification: Not Classified Classification: Not Classified
This video has closed captioning
The China Syndrome It’s no secret that Australia’s relationship with China is as complicated as it is fragile. On the one hand, China is the key to our economic prosperity, so ...

The China Syndrome It’s no secret that Australia’s relationship with China is as complicated as it is fragile. On the one hand, China is the key to our economic prosperity, so if we want to be rich we need to embrace the Chinese. On the other hand, there’s no question we have a fear of China’s expanding influence, and we don’t want them getting too close. Which is why what is happening in the South Pacific is causing growing concern. Somewhat arrogantly, Australia has always considered it our “patch of paradise” to protect and nurture. But now the Chinese are moving in and splashing their cash in places like Fiji and Vanuatu. So what’s next? Tom Steinfort investigates claims the Chinese may ultimately be planning to build military bases right on our doorstep. Fake News For millions of tourists visiting Australia the boomerang and the didgeridoo are iconic and highly sought after symbols of our indigenous culture. But unbelievably, most didgeridoos and boomerangs are now made in Indonesia, in Bali specifically, not here in Australia. It’s not because there’s a thriving expatriate Aboriginal community living up there, it’s all about money. Indonesian workers can churn out cheap copies of our artefacts by the shipload. And that’s very attractive for the businesses involved, which are happy to exploit or disrespect 40,000 years of culture in the pursuit of cashing in on gullible tourists. Taken - Update It is one of the most bizarre crimes 60 Minutes has ever encountered: the abduction last July of 20-year-old glamour model Chloe Ayling. She says she was snatched off a street in Milan and kept hostage in a remote Italian farmhouse while her kidnappers arranged to auction her off as a sex slave to the highest bidder. Chloe’s escape from this terrifying ordeal was so extraordinary that many accused her of making the whole story up – an elaborate publicity stunt for fame and fortune. Earlier this week a judge in an Italian court had his say, and as Liam Bartlett reports, the intrigue continues.

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Insight
52:36

Insight: Gassy Coonamble

Season 1 Episode 16 SBS May 29, 2018

News and current affairs

Intercultural understanding

9-10
11-12
Classification: Not Classified Classification: Not Classified
This video has closed captioning
Jenny Brockie takes a look at what happens when coal seam gas comes to town. Steven Jones, a Narrabri local of 35 years, lives on 800 acres near the NSW Pilliga Forest. Part ...

Jenny Brockie takes a look at what happens when coal seam gas comes to town. Steven Jones, a Narrabri local of 35 years, lives on 800 acres near the NSW Pilliga Forest. Part of his property falls within the boundaries of a proposed coal seam gas drilling area. After living next door to exploration gas wells, he says he would be happy to have the wells on his property and doesn’t have any concerns with this type of resource being developed in the region. “As long as the government keeps an eye on it to make sure they don’t do wrong…I’m 100 per cent for them.” But some Narrabri locals are less certain. Jon-Maree wouldn’t be happy to have the wells on her land out of concern about the potential environmental effects, in particular the risk to the region’s water supply. “I think it's really important to understand that a rural property, without water, is nothing. Without water our communities don't function.” That’s a concern shared by many vocal opponents from Coonamble, a small rural town, almost 200km from the proposed project area. Adam and Rowena Macrae are farmers who have poured money into their almost 4,000 acre property. Part of a 461km pipeline, that will transport the gas from the project to the NSW market, is slated to be built under their land. They feel there is too much uncertainty around the project and its associated infrastructure. “I think that the risks are too high and we're not prepared to take those risks with our family.” Gas company Santos has overseen exploration in the area in recent years and says these wells could provide up to 50 per cent of NSW’s gas needs. Last year, Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull urged the NSW Government to approve the Narrabri Gas Project. But local opinion about the project is divided. More than 23,000 submissions were received by the NSW Department of Planning, making it the most protested project in the history of the department. With a looming domestic gas shortage on the horizon and the region awaiting to hear whether the project gets given the green light by the NSW Government, a special edition of Insight travels to Narrabri to hear from those who may be affected by the project and its infrastructure.

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