#YesAllMen
26:27

#YesAllMen

SBS November 20, 2018

News and current affairs

Personal and social capability

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Is masculinity killing Aussie men? They drink more, smoke more, do more drugs, deal more drugs and die younger. Men get bashed, robbed and murdered more - mostly by other men. ...

Is masculinity killing Aussie men? They drink more, smoke more, do more drugs, deal more drugs and die younger. Men get bashed, robbed and murdered more - mostly by other men. The program asks why.

2015 Year In Review
29:59

2015 Year In Review

Episode 1 ABC January 3, 2016

News and current affairs

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ABC News takes a look back at the events and stories that shaped 2015.

ABC News takes a look back at the events and stories that shaped 2015.

2015 Year In Review
27:20

2015 Year In Review

Episode 2 ABC January 9, 2016

News and current affairs

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A look back at some of the major stories of the year.

A look back at some of the major stories of the year.

49 Up
1:33:30

49 Up

Episode 1 SBS Viceland September 15, 2019

News and current affairs

7-8
9-10
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Classification: Parental GuidanceClassification: Parental Guidance
The group have become adults, dealing with everything life has thrown at them in between, and they have all provided a unique snapshot of British social history. Now it ...

The group have become adults, dealing with everything life has thrown at them in between, and they have all provided a unique snapshot of British social history. Now it catches up with the group as they approach their half-century in this ultimate study of nature versus nurture.

49 Up
1:08:44

49 Up

Episode 2 SBS Viceland September 15, 2019

News and current affairs

7-8
9-10
11-12
Classification: Parental GuidanceClassification: Parental Guidance
The group have become adults, dealing with everything life has thrown at them in between, and they have all provided a unique snapshot of British social history. Now it ...

The group have become adults, dealing with everything life has thrown at them in between, and they have all provided a unique snapshot of British social history. Now it catches up with the group as they approach their half-century in this ultimate study of nature versus nurture.

60 Minutes
50:58

60 Minutes: What Happens in Vegas/The Killer Downstairs

Nine July 24, 2016

News and current affairs

9-10
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WHAT HAPPENS IN VEGAS That memorable tourist slogan "What happens in Vegas stays in Vegas" is particularly apt for Human Nature. You remember Human Nature? The Australian boy ...

WHAT HAPPENS IN VEGAS That memorable tourist slogan "What happens in Vegas stays in Vegas" is particularly apt for Human Nature. You remember Human Nature? The Australian boy band of the 1990s, four high school mates with a passion for pop harmonies. Well, the boys became men, and in 2009 Toby Allen, Phil Burton and brothers, Andrew and Mike Tierney, decided to chance their luck in the toughest entertainment town in the world, Las Vegas. For their first show they sold eight tickets, but now, seven years on, they sell out every performance, and by staying in Vegas, Human Nature are transforming "sin city" into "sing city". THE KILLER DOWNSTAIRS Sometimes greed is so consuming it blocks out all human reasoning and logic. How else can anyone explain Adeel Khan's actions? Two years ago, Khan, 46, deliberately blew up his Sydney convenience store so he could claim $225,000 in insurance. The blast was so destructive the two-storey building crumbled to the ground and three innocent lives, including an 11-month-old baby, were lost. That Adeel Khan thought he could get away with the crime is as outrageous as the act itself, and next week this evil man will be sentenced for murder, manslaughter and arson. But no amount of prison time will be long enough for the grieving families of those he killed.

60 Minutes
49:18

60 Minutes: Wedding Of The Century/Lord Of The Web/A Deadly Secret

Nine April 10, 2011

News and current affairs

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The story, 'Wedding of the century', discusses the upcoming wedding of Prince William and Kate Middleton. The story, 'Lord of the web', features an interview with Facebook ...

The story, 'Wedding of the century', discusses the upcoming wedding of Prince William and Kate Middleton. The story, 'Lord of the web', features an interview with Facebook CEO, Mark Zuckerberg. The story, 'A deadly secret', investigates the mysterious circumstances surrounding the two girlfriends of NSW farmer Robert Geeves.

60 Minutes
51:58

60 Minutes: Diana's Secrets/Lorde Knows/Death Of A Champ

Nine June 18, 2017

News and current affairs

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Diana's Secrets When Diana, the Princess of Wales, died in a car crash in a Paris city tunnel 20 years ago the world could barely believe it. She had been one of the most ...

Diana's Secrets When Diana, the Princess of Wales, died in a car crash in a Paris city tunnel 20 years ago the world could barely believe it. She had been one of the most adored women of the 20th century, the young girl who'd grown up and married her prince, the heir to the throne, in a fairytale romance. Sadly, the fairytale was just that, a myth. Despite intense scrutiny and speculation, the reality was a story no-one wanted to believe until Diana told journalist and author Andrew Moreton the secrets of her miserable existence; the reasons for her failed marriage and her heartbreaking attempts to end her life. Moreton's book was a jaw-dropping expose that changed the palace forever. Now 25 years later Liz Hayes discovers there's even more to this story - an intriguing spy tale worthy of its own book. There are revelations about secret tape recordings and clandestine meetings that will once again captivate Lorde Knows Just a few short years ago, Lorde was a shy and awkward schoolgirl in New Zealand. Then she wrote and recorded the song Royals, which she gave away free to anyone who wanted it. It was either an act of great generosity or masterful marketing, but probably both. Almost instantly the then 16-year-old transformed herself into a pop princess. Her unique voice and extraordinary songwriting ability catapulted her to music stardom. Now, four years later, there's a second coming. Lorde is back with new music and a highly anticipated - and applauded - new album. And as Allison Langdon discovered, she's as intelligent, quirky and wonderful as ever. Death Of A Champ If ever there was an example of why the sport of boxing has so many critics demanding it should be banned, then the tragedy of professional boxer Davey Browne is surely it. Two years ago Browne was in a Sydney boxing ring, literally fighting for his life. He lost, dying at just 28 years of age. This week, the NSW Coroner will hand down findings into the circumstances that allowed the young champion to be beaten to death in a supposedly properly regulated and fully sanctioned international bout. The question is why didn't boxing officials step in to stop the fight? It's something Browne's family - most of whom watched him die - desperately need answered.

60 Minutes
53:20

60 Minutes: A Day In The Life: Paul McCartney/The Talking Dead/The Great Divide

Nine June 25, 2017

News and current affairs

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A Day In The Life: Paul McCartney This year marks the 50th anniversary of the release of the Beatles' Sgt Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band. It's the musical masterpiece many ...

A Day In The Life: Paul McCartney This year marks the 50th anniversary of the release of the Beatles' Sgt Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band. It's the musical masterpiece many consider the greatest rock 'n' roll album ever made. For Paul McCartney that's not a bad achievement in a career overflowing with accolades and accomplishments. With the Beatles, Wings and as a solo artist, McCartney has sold more than 700 million albums and won so many awards he can barely remember them. His contribution to music has also been recognised with a knighthood. Sir Paul has just celebrated his 75th birthday but has no plans to slow down - instead he's now got Australia in his sights. The Talking Dead Twelve months ago, crime fighters in Australia got a brand-new weapon. It's a little gruesome so it's hidden away in a secret location in the Blue Mountains west of Sydney, but already it is helping police solve murders and missing person cases. It's Australia's first body farm. That's right, a final, very exposed resting place for some of those very generous people who agree to donate themselves to science when they die. In America body farms have proven a vital forensic tool, where investigators are able to study rates of human decomposition. As Peter Stefanovic discovers, listening to the talking dead is a confronting, but also intriguing, experience. The Great Divide In 1967, Israel defeated its Arab neighbours and rewrote the map of the Middle East in the so-called Six Day War. Since then Palestinians on the West Bank have been forced to live under Israeli occupation and control. What infuriates them even more is Israel's policy of building Jewish settlements on what they consider to be their land. The result of this ongoing and highly provocative act is more hate, more violence, and more death. Not surprisingly it is also breeding new generations of Israelis and Palestinians for whom the word peace is anathema.

60 Minutes
48:33

60 Minutes: Patient 71/Work Till You Drop/Chicago Without Hope

Nine July 2, 2017

News and current affairs

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Patient 71 Five years ago Julie Randall was told she was going to die. No ifs, no buts. Doctors not only said she had melanoma, but that the cancer had spread throughout her ...

Patient 71 Five years ago Julie Randall was told she was going to die. No ifs, no buts. Doctors not only said she had melanoma, but that the cancer had spread throughout her body. They said it was incurable and she'd be lucky if she survived the next nine months. But instead of despairing, Julie did something incredible. She made a promise to her family that she wouldn't die. Then she did something even more amazing. Through sheer determination - and with time quickly running out - she forced her way onto an experimental drug trial in the US. There had only been space for 70, until Julie became patient 71. This, however, was just the beginning of Julie Randall's inspiring battle for survival. Work Till You Drop While he doesn't look it or feel it, Charles Wooley is nudging 70. It's led him to some serious introspection about his existence, and even more sombrely, contemplation of the "R" word. No, he still loves reporting for 60 Minutes, but shouldn't he have retired at 65? Shouldn't his constant companion these days be a fishing rod instead of a typewriter? But as Wooley discovers, retirement is a word most Australians can no longer afford to dream about. The more likely reality, as former federal treasurer Peter Costello - who is now Wooley's boss at Nine - has been warning us about for more than two decades, is that we'll have to work until we drop. Chicago Without Hope Imagine living in a place where every two hours someone is shot, and every 14 hours someone is murdered. It isn't Iraq or Afghanistan, but one of the biggest and most sophisticated cities in the world: Chicago. On the city's south side, which is considered the heart of black America, gang rivalry is tearing its people apart. It has become so brutal that both police and the perpetrators agree this urban warfare is out of control. Liz Hayes ventures into what is now dubbed Chiraq to meet the people who are fighting for survival on the frontline.

60 Minutes
46:09

60 Minutes: The Unthinkable/Apocalypse Soon/Goat Rush

Nine July 9, 2017

News and current affairs

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The Unthinkable This Sunday marks a desperately sad anniversary for Ralph and Kathy Kelly. It will be five years since their beautiful 18-year-old son Thomas died after being ...

The Unthinkable This Sunday marks a desperately sad anniversary for Ralph and Kathy Kelly. It will be five years since their beautiful 18-year-old son Thomas died after being punched in a coward attack. For the Kellys, it's been five years of turmoil and trauma. After the horror of their son's death, Ralph and Kathy wanted some good to happen so they campaigned to change drinking laws in Sydney. There was an immediate and dramatic reduction in alcohol-fuelled violence. But not everyone agreed with the new regulations and the family found themselves a target for sustained and cruel abuse. Then last year, their other son, Stuart, Thomas's little brother, died by suicide. Once again they were forced to make sense of the unthinkable. On 60 Minutes, Ralph and Kathy Kelly speak publicly about their loss for the first time and tell Allison Langdon how they firmly believe that had Thomas not been killed, Stuart would still be alive. For the Kelly family the ripple effect of "one punch" goes on but their courage is as remarkable as their resolve to continue helping others. And with the help of the National Rugby League, they are doing just that. Apocalypse Soon Here's some bad news and some good news. First the bad: the Doomsday Clock is currently set at two and a half minutes to midnight, which is the closest the world has been to monumental catastrophe for the last 64 years. We can thank nuclear weapons, climate change, North Korea and Donald Trump for that scary scenario. But the good news is that it's not too late to protect yourself against the looming threats, and there are plenty of so-called "doomsday preppers" doing just that. They are building extraordinary bunkers and bolt-holes, and filling them up with everything they need to withstand the disintegration of civilisation. But as he glimpses the end of the world, Peter Stefanovic discovers there's even some more bad news: the cost of survival doesn't come cheap. Goat Rush It was only a few years ago that out beyond the back of Bourke goats were considered nothing more than a blight on the landscape, the worst kind of feral pest. But in an inspired reversal of fortune the Billy goat has become King Billy. Soaring prices for goat meat mean clever farmers have been turning a problem into profit, and Australia has become the world's largest exporter of the product. The delicious irony though is that despite saving their bacon, most farmers can't stomach the thought of eating goat. They have remained steadfast beef and mutton men. That is until Charles Wooley introduced them to celebrity chef, Luke Mangan.

60 Minutes
55:44

60 Minutes: Samantha Knight - Never Forgotten/Waist Not, Want Not/Broken Justice

Nine April 2, 2017

News and current affairs

9-10
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Samantha Knight - Never Forgotten If she was still alive, Samantha Knight would have turned 40 a few days ago. Instead she will always be remembered as the bright and ...

Samantha Knight - Never Forgotten If she was still alive, Samantha Knight would have turned 40 a few days ago. Instead she will always be remembered as the bright and beautiful nine-year-old girl from Bondi who one day in August 1986 simply vanished. Her disappearance led to one of the largest police investigations and searches in NSW history but her body has still not been found. In 2001, the notorious paedophile Michael Guider was charged with Samantha's murder, and six months later pleaded guilty to manslaughter, claiming he hadn't meant to kill the little girl. Guider showed no remorse over the crime, but plenty of callousness - he said he simply couldn't remember what he did with her body. Michael Guider is now 66 years old and, having spent the last 21 years in prison, convicted of more than 75 sexual offences against more than a dozen children, is about to become eligible for parole. In a 60 Minutes exclusive, Ross Coulthart tracks down the key witness in the investigation: the man Guider confessed his crimes to. As well, and for the first time, another of Guider's child victims speaks publicly about how he destroyed her life. Coulthart's interviews provide a chilling insight into the mind of an evil paedophile, and powerful testimony to keep Michael Guider locked up. Waist Not, Want Not Being beautiful can be very bad for your health, according to the 24-year-old French model Victoire Macon Dauxerre. Actually, she is now an ex-model. Her fashion faux pas was to write a bestselling book exposing the ugly secrets of her profession, and explaining how the demands of being a model very nearly killed her. Dauxerre tells Tara Brown about the inhumane treatment of young girls in a cutthroat business where careers are made or broken on the whim of agents, photographers and clothing designers. But when Brown asks one fashion industry icon for a response to Dauxerre's claims, she ends up receiving a thin-skinned temper tantrum. Broken Justice Beth Staveley was a 68-year-old grandmother living happily on the Gold Coast with her partner of 20 years, Dennis Wakefield. But one day in June 2014, as she slept in her bed, Wakefield attacked and killed her. For police it seemed to be a tragic but straightforward domestic violence incident and Wakefield was charged with murder. However, the case didn't proceed to trial in the normal criminal system. Instead the matter was dealt with in a 30-minute hearing in Queensland's little-known Mental Health Court. Dennis Wakefield, who had never been diagnosed with a mental illness, went from being a killer to a patient. Now, just three years on from the killing, Ross Coulthart discovers that Wakefield is back out in the community, living in an aged-care facility. Alarmingly, neither the management of the home nor any of its other residents had a clue there was a killer living among them, until contacted by 60 Minutes. Coulthart's investigation raises serious questions about Queensland's judicial and health systems, as he attempts to find out why the wellbeing of a violent killer has seemingly overtaken consideration for the safety of the rest of the community.

60 Minutes
50:10

60 Minutes: Vapour Trails/Petite Tina/Never Give Up/Update: Who Killed Josh

Nine April 9, 2017

News and current affairs

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Vapour Trails For years and years, executives from big tobacco all over the world perpetrated the myth - always with a straight face and often on oath - that smoking was ...

Vapour Trails For years and years, executives from big tobacco all over the world perpetrated the myth - always with a straight face and often on oath - that smoking was neither addictive nor harmful. But Tara Brown has just done an interview that will surely take your breath away. It's with a current, senior scientist at British American Tobacco who finally admits what we have all known for a long time. Smoking kills. No, he doesn't have a gun held to his head, but he does have an agenda. He wants to promote nicotine e-cigarettes, or vaping as it's also called in Europe and America. And guess what? It is safer than tobacco ... but does that mean it's really safe? Petite Tina Time flies when you're having fun. Just ask Tina Arena. Many will find it hard to believe, but it's 40 years since a confident, in-tune 10-year-old girl quickly nicknamed Tiny Tina began belting out pop songs on the TV show, Young Talent Time. And if you do the maths, that means this year Tina Arena is celebrating another significant milestone. But while we've always loved her and her music here in Australia, she's been an even bigger hit in France. Never Give Up When Anna Meares retired last year she did so as the greatest female track cyclist ever. It's a wonderful achievement, but it would not have happened without her coach Gary West, the gruff taskmaster and brilliant tactician who engineered her success. Tragically, now Gary is in for the ride - and the battle - of his life. He has been diagnosed with motor neurone disease, a cruel condition with no cure. His body is rapidly failing him and doctors have said he may only have months to live. But Gary is up for the fight - and so is Anna Meares. Update: Who Killed Josh Last year 60 Minutes reported the case of young aboriginal man Gene Gibson, convicted of killing 21-year-old Josh Warneke in Broome in 2010. Liam Bartlett's investigation revealed a police case against Gibson which was so flawed and incompetent that even Josh's mother, Ingrid Bishop, has been fighting to have her son's killer freed. This week the West Australian Court of Appeal heard more arguments why this is one of most shocking miscarriages of justice in the state's history.

60 Minutes
45:31

60 Minutes: The Great Escape/The Hornet/A Tooth For An Eye

Nine April 16, 2017

News and current affairs

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The Great Escape Who hasn't dreamt about quitting their job to live on a tropical island or travel around the country on a never-ending holiday? Well, incredibly, more and ...

The Great Escape Who hasn't dreamt about quitting their job to live on a tropical island or travel around the country on a never-ending holiday? Well, incredibly, more and more Australians are actually doing it, and it's not just those with greying hair who are enjoying these nomadic adventures. Thousands of young families are giving up the rat race, packing up their lives in the city, and choosing the great escape. As Tara Brown found out, it's a wonderful way of life, until it goes wrong. The Hornet If Jeff Horn wasn't bullied and called names when he was a kid growing up in Queensland, it's likely he'd still be Jeff who? But the schoolyard thugs taught him a great lesson: How to stand up for himself. And he's done such a good job of it, Jeff Horn is now The Hornet, the World Boxing Organisation's No.2-ranked welterweight fighter. This Brisbane school teacher is a rather improbable boxer though, brainy instead of brawly, respectful instead of raging. As Liam Bartlett reports, The Hornet will need every skill possible when he takes on his next opponent, the 11-time world champion, boxing legend, Manny Pacquiao. A Tooth For An Eye Imagine suffering with partial or total blindness for years only to have your sight restored with, of all things, one of your own teeth. At first it sounds more like quackery than groundbreaking medicine. But it's not. Doctors remove the patient's tooth and implant it with a new lens into their eye. This extraordinary operation has been done overseas before, but until now, never in Australia. As Ross Coulthart reports, the procedure is as risky as it is ingenious but the reward, if successful, is life changing.

60 Minutes
49:54

60 Minutes: Kelly/States Of Hate/Keep Out/The Missing

Nine April 30, 2017

News and current affairs

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Kelly What's more impressive: Selling a 100 million albums or having Beyonce as your best friend? For Kelly Rowland it doesn't matter because she can claim both, and a whole ...

Kelly What's more impressive: Selling a 100 million albums or having Beyonce as your best friend? For Kelly Rowland it doesn't matter because she can claim both, and a whole lot more. At 36 her life continues to be a blur of brilliance. A superstar solo singer who first made her name - alongside the Queen Bey - as a member of one of the world's most successful girl groups, Destiny's Child. Kelly is also now a judge on The Voice, where the wannabe stars, if they're smart, will learn a lot from this very busy and driven woman. States Of Hate This weekend in the US, President Donald Trump notches up his first 100 days in office. And many would argue that so far he has lived up to expectations. But the rise of Donald Trump has also seen a disturbing surge in the number of hate groups and hate crimes. There is now a genuine fear that we are witnessing a new era of racism-fuelled hatred, and that ignoring it and those who perpetrate hate will do nothing to stop it. Update: Keep Out On Thursday Prime Minister John Howard announced he was imposing tough new restrictions on gas exporters to solve our domestic energy crisis and reduce prices for Australian consumers. It's a drastic step which Mr Turnbull says is needed to save the economy, and more particularly 65,000 jobs at immediate risk. But he also says state and territory governments must allow greater gas exploration to increase supply. That's all well and good, unless it gives the gas producers a licence to do what they want. Last year 60 Minutes reported how cattle farmer Kane Booth was forced off his land, his livelihood destroyed, when Queensland Gas Company moved in to extract coal seam gas. Well Kane is still fighting, and QGC is still acting like a bully. Update: The Missing It's an alarming and surprising statistic: every hour four Australians go missing. That equals 100 people a day, or 38,000 a year, who vanish. Thankfully most are found relatively quickly, but for the families of those who aren't, the torment of not knowing what has happened to their loved one is devastating. Because of her own terrible experience when her 24-year-old brother disappeared, Loren O'Keeffe has decided we must do more to help the families of missing people.

60 Minutes
46:20

60 Minutes: The Killer Storm/Helter Shelter/Impossible Choice

Nine May 14, 2017

News and current affairs

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The Killer Storm All Australians are used to weathering frequent and ferocious thunderstorms, but the one that raced through country Victoria and slammed into Melbourne on ...

The Killer Storm All Australians are used to weathering frequent and ferocious thunderstorms, but the one that raced through country Victoria and slammed into Melbourne on November 21 last year was loaded with unexpected peril. Within a matter of minutes the entire city was left gasping for air in a mass asthma epidemic. Thousands were struck down, including many who weren't even asthmatic. Emergency services were unable to cope with the number of calls for assistance and hospital emergency departments were overflowing with distressed patients. Tragically, nine people died that terrible day. What caused it was a highly unusual phenomenon called "Thunderstorm Asthma", but this outbreak was the most severe and catastrophic the world has ever seen. In a special 60 Minutes investigation Tara Brown reveals that what is even more frightening is that it will happen again. The problem though is that no one knows where or when. Helter Shelter Confused about the property market? Can't afford to get in? Can't afford to get out? Well you're not alone. Surely, getting and keeping a roof over our heads should not be this hard. But the housing crisis continues to defy all attempts at a solution. It gets more shambolic and divisive by the day. The haves against the have-nots, rich versus poor, even old against young. This week on 60 Minutes, the Nine Network's Finance Editor, Ross Greenwood, gets some blunt advice from those who should know the answers: Australia's property billionaires. Impossible Choice Like thousands of other young mums, newspaper journalist Elle Halliwell will celebrate her first Mother's Day on Sunday. It's a joyous time for Elle and her husband Nick, who welcomed a baby boy into their lives last December. But it's happiness mixed with stress and fear because two days before Elle discovered she was pregnant she was told she had a rare and dangerous leukaemia. Back then she faced an awful dilemma: abort the baby and save her own life, or risk her life by delaying her cancer treatment until after the birth. It's a decision that is still causing Elle heartache.

60 Minutes
49:35

60 Minutes: Cassandra Sainsbury: The Real Story/Don't Tell

Nine May 21, 2017

News and current affairs

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Cassandra Sainsbury: The Real Story For the past five weeks South Australian woman Cassandra Sainsbury has been locked away in a dingy and overcrowded prison in Bogota, ...

Cassandra Sainsbury: The Real Story For the past five weeks South Australian woman Cassandra Sainsbury has been locked away in a dingy and overcrowded prison in Bogota, Colombia, accused of smuggling cocaine. The evidence against her is damning: 5.8kg of the drug were found in her suitcase at the airport as she tried to leave the country. Cassandra says she's innocent, but the reality is her prospects are bleak. It's a distressing time for the 22-year-old as well as her mother and sister, who've spent the last week in Bogota trying to make sense of this awful nightmare. Don't Tell As a 12-year-old, Lyndal was sexually abused while she was a boarder at Toowoomba Prep, one of the Anglican Church's elite private schools in Queensland. Her attacker always told her, "Don't tell, no-one will believe you," and as it turned out, he was right. The abuse went on for eight harrowing months before the predator's evil was discovered. But that wasn't the end of Lyndal's suffering. Her attempts to get the help she desperately needed were ignored by the school and the church. Even approaches to then-archbishop Peter Hollingworth led nowhere. He went on to become Australia's governor-general, while Lyndal's life spiralled out of control. After years of misery, one day she decided she'd had enough and what she did next saw the beginning of the end for the governor-general. Lyndal's inspirational battle has now been turned into a movie called Don't Tell, but she's never spoken publicly about her ordeal. Until now.

60 Minutes
51:23

60 Minutes: The Survivor/Boom To Bust/Search For A Son

Nine July 16, 2017

News and current affairs

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The Survivor Twenty years ago this month the world was transfixed by the frantic search for life at the alpine ski resort of Thredbo. A landslide had obliterated two ski ...

The Survivor Twenty years ago this month the world was transfixed by the frantic search for life at the alpine ski resort of Thredbo. A landslide had obliterated two ski lodges, burying 19 people beneath an enormous deluge of mud, concrete and rock. As hours turned into days, and with temperatures plunging well below freezing, the prospect of finding survivors began to fade. That was until the muffled cries of Stuart Diver were heard from beneath the rubble. With incredible courage, Stuart clung to life as an extraordinary rescue effort got underway. And 65 nerve-wracking hours after the landslide, Thredbo's sole survivor emerged to the cheers of the world. For Stuart Diver the elation was short-lived. Numbed by the loss of his beloved wife Sally and so many close friends and neighbours, he struggled to rebuild his life. Eventually he found new love and looked to start a family. But once again tragedy struck when his second wife, Rosanna, was diagnosed with cancer. She lost her fight for life, but not before giving birth to a beautiful baby girl. In a breathtaking 60 Minutes interview, Stuart Diver speaks candidly to Tara Brown about Thredbo and his life of love and loss. We meet those who were pivotal to his survival and the daughter who has become his world. Two decades after the disaster, Stuart's incredible zest for life is an inspiration to us all. Boom To Bust It's no secret that the big banks can be ruthless when they want their money back. But this story reveals a new low in their breathtaking arrogance. For more than 30 years Roy Lavis helped to build Cairns and turn it into the bustling tourist mecca it is today. His construction company also directly and indirectly employed several thousand locals. Roy's business was so prosperous the Commonwealth Bank threw money at him and encouraged him to expand. In return he always paid them back on time, principal and interest. Everyone was a winner. Until suddenly the bank changed its mind. Search For A Son A thirst for adventure took Australian Owen Rooney on a dream trip halfway around the world. But he never made it back home. After walking out of a Canadian hospital in 2010, Owen, then 24, simply vanished into the night. It soon became clear the circumstances of Owen's disappearance were as disturbing as they were baffling. In the months after he went missing 60 Minutes joined Owen's family in British Columbia as they searched in vain for their son. There were no answers then, and in the years since, his fate has remained a mystery. That is, until now.