60 Minutes
52:26

60 Minutes: Impossible Choice/Pablo Escobar: My Father/Less Is More/Saroo: The Movie

Nine November 20, 2016

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Impossible Choice As a journalist, Elle Halliwell is used to reporting the news, good and bad. But nothing could prepare her for the devastating news she received in April ...

Impossible Choice As a journalist, Elle Halliwell is used to reporting the news, good and bad. But nothing could prepare her for the devastating news she received in April about herself. She was diagnosed with an incurable cancer called chronic myeloid leukaemia. Understandably Elle was in shock but then 48 hours later she received more news. She was pregnant with her first baby. Doctors advised her to terminate her pregnancy and begin cancer treatment immediately. Elle and her husband Nick were faced with an awful and cruel dilemma: to save Elle's life, they should sacrifice their unborn child. The decision they made is both inspiring and heartbreaking. Pablo Escobar: My Father It wasn't just that Pablo Escobar peddled tonnes and tonnes of narcotics around the world, seemingly without fear of being caught, which made him so terrifying. Or the intimidation and extreme violence he used to maintain control of his evil empire. Or even that this drug lord became richer and more powerful than Colombia, the country he lived in. The scariest thing about Pablo Escobar is that so many people revered him as a hero. And they still do, even though it's 20 years since he was killed. Colombia is slowly recovering from the deadly narco wars of the 1980s and '90s, and Escobar's son, Juan Pablo Escobar, is slowly starting to make sense of an extraordinary life with the megalomaniac he called Dad. Less Is More At his peak, famed rugby player Peter FitzSimons was one of our leanest and meanest athletes. But after the Wallabies a sedentary life, junk food and too much grog took its toll on his physique. Like many other blokes, he became fat - "fatty boomka" is how he described himself. Then a mid-life epiphany changed everything. Now more than 40kg lighter and altogether happier, the new Peter FitzSimons wants to share his simple secret of transformation. Saroo: The Movie You have to marvel at Saroo Brierley's incredible will and tireless ingenuity. He was born into a loving but poverty-stricken family in India, however one day when he was five they literally lost him. The little boy roamed the country until he was eventually saved by an orphanage, and then adopted by a Tasmanian family. Saroo grew up in Australia but never stopped searching for his Indian family. Against impossible odds he found them. His story is so remarkable that Hollywood has made a movie about him, and it's already generating Oscar buzz.

60 Minutes
53:20

60 Minutes: A Day In The Life: Paul McCartney/The Talking Dead/The Great Divide

Nine June 25, 2017

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A Day In The Life: Paul McCartney This year marks the 50th anniversary of the release of the Beatles' Sgt Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band. It's the musical masterpiece many ...

A Day In The Life: Paul McCartney This year marks the 50th anniversary of the release of the Beatles' Sgt Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band. It's the musical masterpiece many consider the greatest rock 'n' roll album ever made. For Paul McCartney that's not a bad achievement in a career overflowing with accolades and accomplishments. With the Beatles, Wings and as a solo artist, McCartney has sold more than 700 million albums and won so many awards he can barely remember them. His contribution to music has also been recognised with a knighthood. Sir Paul has just celebrated his 75th birthday but has no plans to slow down - instead he's now got Australia in his sights. The Talking Dead Twelve months ago, crime fighters in Australia got a brand-new weapon. It's a little gruesome so it's hidden away in a secret location in the Blue Mountains west of Sydney, but already it is helping police solve murders and missing person cases. It's Australia's first body farm. That's right, a final, very exposed resting place for some of those very generous people who agree to donate themselves to science when they die. In America body farms have proven a vital forensic tool, where investigators are able to study rates of human decomposition. As Peter Stefanovic discovers, listening to the talking dead is a confronting, but also intriguing, experience. The Great Divide In 1967, Israel defeated its Arab neighbours and rewrote the map of the Middle East in the so-called Six Day War. Since then Palestinians on the West Bank have been forced to live under Israeli occupation and control. What infuriates them even more is Israel's policy of building Jewish settlements on what they consider to be their land. The result of this ongoing and highly provocative act is more hate, more violence, and more death. Not surprisingly it is also breeding new generations of Israelis and Palestinians for whom the word peace is anathema.

60 Minutes
59:01

60 Minutes: Gable Tostee: The interview/Much Ado About Nothing/Sting

Nine November 13, 2016

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Gable Tostee: The Interview They both wanted uncomplicated, fast sex, and hooking up on the dating app Tinder was the perfect way to do it. But when Gable Tostee met Warriena ...

Gable Tostee: The Interview They both wanted uncomplicated, fast sex, and hooking up on the dating app Tinder was the perfect way to do it. But when Gable Tostee met Warriena Wright two years ago their night of passion ended in death. Neighbours heard a drunken argument, physical fighting and then a sickening scream as Warriena fell 14 floors from Tostee's Gold Coast apartment balcony. That was horrific enough, but Tostee's unusual behaviour, and his apparent disregard for Warriena in the seconds and minutes after she fell, has led to public condemnation of the then 28-year-old playboy. Instead of calling 000 he tried to call his lawyer. Then he left his apartment and wandered around Surfers Paradise before buying and eating a slice of pizza. For two years Tostee has maintained his silence. He refused to be interviewed by police or take the stand during his sensational trial. Last month a Queensland jury acquitted him of Warriena Wright's murder after they heard an extraordinary piece of evidence: his own smartphone recording of what happened. Now Gable Tostee wants to speak publicly, and in an extraordinary interview with Liam Bartlett, tries to explain his version of events on that terrible night. Much Ado About Nothing Jerry Seinfeld is without doubt the world's most famous comedian. He's made people laugh for almost 40 years and managed to turn a TV show about nothing into the most successful sitcom in entertainment history. The everyday antics of Jerry, Elaine, George and Kramer became the stuff of comedy legend around the world. Who could forget the Puffy Shirt, the Soup Nazi or the Contest? In an industry where so few succeed, Seinfeld has managed to make a career and some pretty serious money. But as he tells Liz Hayes, it's not as easy as it looks and is in fact an exacting science which demands mountains of research and development. And that probably explains why Jerry Seinfeld is so good at it. Sting How's this for a cutting personality assessment: one of Sting's own bandmates reckons the singer-songwriter is an egotist, a narcissist and a misanthrope! Ouch. Tara Brown, however, met quite a different 65-year-old rock star in New York. These days, despite being described as being "richer than God", Sting is happiest at home living a simple life with his wife of 35 years and six children. Of course, on the music front, he's still working hard and has no plans to retire. In fact he has just released another solo album, but as it races up the charts he's getting a serious run for his money from an unlikely showbiz competitor: his own daughter.

60 Minutes
48:33

60 Minutes: Patient 71/Work Till You Drop/Chicago Without Hope

Nine July 2, 2017

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Patient 71 Five years ago Julie Randall was told she was going to die. No ifs, no buts. Doctors not only said she had melanoma, but that the cancer had spread throughout her ...

Patient 71 Five years ago Julie Randall was told she was going to die. No ifs, no buts. Doctors not only said she had melanoma, but that the cancer had spread throughout her body. They said it was incurable and she'd be lucky if she survived the next nine months. But instead of despairing, Julie did something incredible. She made a promise to her family that she wouldn't die. Then she did something even more amazing. Through sheer determination - and with time quickly running out - she forced her way onto an experimental drug trial in the US. There had only been space for 70, until Julie became patient 71. This, however, was just the beginning of Julie Randall's inspiring battle for survival. Work Till You Drop While he doesn't look it or feel it, Charles Wooley is nudging 70. It's led him to some serious introspection about his existence, and even more sombrely, contemplation of the "R" word. No, he still loves reporting for 60 Minutes, but shouldn't he have retired at 65? Shouldn't his constant companion these days be a fishing rod instead of a typewriter? But as Wooley discovers, retirement is a word most Australians can no longer afford to dream about. The more likely reality, as former federal treasurer Peter Costello - who is now Wooley's boss at Nine - has been warning us about for more than two decades, is that we'll have to work until we drop. Chicago Without Hope Imagine living in a place where every two hours someone is shot, and every 14 hours someone is murdered. It isn't Iraq or Afghanistan, but one of the biggest and most sophisticated cities in the world: Chicago. On the city's south side, which is considered the heart of black America, gang rivalry is tearing its people apart. It has become so brutal that both police and the perpetrators agree this urban warfare is out of control. Liz Hayes ventures into what is now dubbed Chiraq to meet the people who are fighting for survival on the frontline.

60 Minutes
45:22

60 Minutes: Swimming South/Breaking The Cycle/Endless Love

Nine January 29, 2017

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Swimming South Australia's tourism industry, one of the enduring constants of our economy, is facing a tiny problem that is so enormous it could cost us billions. It's the ...

Swimming South Australia's tourism industry, one of the enduring constants of our economy, is facing a tiny problem that is so enormous it could cost us billions. It's the Irukandji jellyfish, small, barely visible and deadly. Think of a bluebottle on steroids. Officially, two people have died of Irukandji stings here but experts fear the number is going to get much higher. It used to only be found in the waters of far northern Australia, but as the seas have been heating up these jellyfish have been swimming south into far more populated areas - and the frightening news is they're coming to a beach near you. Breaking The Cycle There is a terrible statistic we can no longer hide from or ignore. Every week in this country a woman is killed by her partner or former partner, with many more injured. Just as tragically, thousands of children get caught in their parents' crossfire. When violence in families becomes the norm the consequences can be dire. Allison Langdon meets a 16-year-old boy who started abusing his mother after witnessing his parents' volatile relationship. Courageously, he's speaking out in the hope of stopping others doing what he did. Endless Love Australians used to balance a healthy scepticism for our politicians with a begrudging respect. But now, if you believe the polls, politicians are about as popular as, well, journalists. Malcolm Turnbull's not a bad bloke but it seems we can't wait to get rid of him, just like we ditched Tony Abbott and Kevin Rudd and Julia Gillard. Without giving any of them much of a chance to be great. Maybe aspiring PMs need to visit the master. Would you believe it is 25 years since Bob Hawke held the top job? Back then we loved him in spite of, or maybe because of, his imperfections, including that he left his wife Hazel for another woman. As you'll see, today Bob is more popular than ever, and still wonderfully in love with Blanche d'Alpuget.

60 Minutes
49:30

60 Minutes: Can Do Better/The Test/The Prime Minister

Nine February 5, 2017

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Can Do Better While parents around the country are undoubtedly pleased the 2017 school year has begun, they'll get little pleasure in knowing the declining standard of ...

Can Do Better While parents around the country are undoubtedly pleased the 2017 school year has begun, they'll get little pleasure in knowing the declining standard of education their children are receiving. Our global ranking for mathematics, reading and science, once a source of national pride, is slipping at an alarming rate. Worse still, students are being crushed by the pressure of academic expectation while more and more teachers are quitting the profession. But across the world in Finland there has been an education revolution. In this icy country they've discovered the best way to get top marks is to chill out. It's a relaxed approach to learning that is starting to work in one school in Melbourne too. The Test For their entire lives, sister and brother Ashleigh and Matthew Knox have lived in the shadow of a terrible curse. Three generations of their family have inherited a gene mutation which exposes them to a great risk of cancer and early death. Many of their relatives have fallen victim, but Ashleigh and Matthew no longer want to be burdened by uncertainty. They want to know if they carry the faulty gene or not, and they've taken the brave decision to have the test that lets them look into the future - to see if it will be good or bad. The Prime Minister It's been a tough week for Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull. For the latest on Australia's deteriorating relationship with the US, the Nine Network's award-winning political editor, Laurie Oakes, sits down with Mr Turnbull to discuss how to deal with the unpredictable President Donald Trump and where to from here.

60 Minutes
54:29

60 Minutes: My Brilliant Career/MH17/The Long Road Ahead

Nine October 16, 2016

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My Brilliant Career Whether they're at the ground or on the couch at home, every Australian cricket fan thinks they're an expert, and making brutal assessments about the ...

My Brilliant Career Whether they're at the ground or on the couch at home, every Australian cricket fan thinks they're an expert, and making brutal assessments about the players is all part of the sport of watching the sport. Not surprisingly, when the name Michael Clarke is mentioned everyone has an opinion. The statistics show he was one of our greatest players and captains. But while we loved him scoring runs and winning games for Australia we could never quite figure out what he was doing off the field - or why. As well, Clarke often seemed a bit too flashy for our liking, and sometimes not reverential enough about the game. As you would expect though, the man himself has a very different view. In the year since he retired from the game, Michael Clarke has had plenty of time to reflect on his career, and as Allison Langdon discovers, he now wants to set the record straight on all the headlines. MH17 With the push of a button, in July 2014 somebody in eastern Ukraine launched a missile which brought down Malaysian Airlines Flight MH17. It killed 298 innocent people, including 38 Australian citizens and permanent residents. It is our greatest loss of life overseas since the Bali bombing. Whether it was a stupid mistake or an act of pure evil, investigators are determined to track down those responsible and bring them to justice. In fact they already know who they're looking for, which is in big part because of the efforts of the Australian Federal Police. Almost 500 AFP officers have been involved in a joint international taskforce, and for the first time they take us inside the extraordinarily detailed investigation. The Long Road Ahead The founder of the International Olympic Committee, Pierre de Coubertin, liked to recite the Latin term "Citius, Altius, Fortius". It translates as "Faster, Higher, Stronger". However, the pursuit of sporting supremacy comes with risks, as Australian silver medallist Sam Willoughby, 25, has tragically discovered. This elite BMX rider is a two-time world champion and a sponsor's delight. But four weeks ago he crashed while training in the USA, and in a terrible instant lost all feeling below his chest. Now he faces his greatest uphill battle: not to cycle again, simply to walk. Sam is determined to win this fight and with the support of his wonderful family, including fiancee Alise Post, he is already proving what a great champion he really is.

60 Minutes
45:31

60 Minutes: The Great Escape/The Hornet/A Tooth For An Eye

Nine April 16, 2017

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The Great Escape Who hasn't dreamt about quitting their job to live on a tropical island or travel around the country on a never-ending holiday? Well, incredibly, more and ...

The Great Escape Who hasn't dreamt about quitting their job to live on a tropical island or travel around the country on a never-ending holiday? Well, incredibly, more and more Australians are actually doing it, and it's not just those with greying hair who are enjoying these nomadic adventures. Thousands of young families are giving up the rat race, packing up their lives in the city, and choosing the great escape. As Tara Brown found out, it's a wonderful way of life, until it goes wrong. The Hornet If Jeff Horn wasn't bullied and called names when he was a kid growing up in Queensland, it's likely he'd still be Jeff who? But the schoolyard thugs taught him a great lesson: How to stand up for himself. And he's done such a good job of it, Jeff Horn is now The Hornet, the World Boxing Organisation's No.2-ranked welterweight fighter. This Brisbane school teacher is a rather improbable boxer though, brainy instead of brawly, respectful instead of raging. As Liam Bartlett reports, The Hornet will need every skill possible when he takes on his next opponent, the 11-time world champion, boxing legend, Manny Pacquiao. A Tooth For An Eye Imagine suffering with partial or total blindness for years only to have your sight restored with, of all things, one of your own teeth. At first it sounds more like quackery than groundbreaking medicine. But it's not. Doctors remove the patient's tooth and implant it with a new lens into their eye. This extraordinary operation has been done overseas before, but until now, never in Australia. As Ross Coulthart reports, the procedure is as risky as it is ingenious but the reward, if successful, is life changing.

60 Minutes
39:56

60 Minutes: Unmasked/Game On/Turia

Nine June 11, 2017

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Unmasked Nineteen-year-old Dylan Voller spent much of his childhood locked up in juvenile detention centres in the Northern Territory. And there he might have stayed, caught ...

Unmasked Nineteen-year-old Dylan Voller spent much of his childhood locked up in juvenile detention centres in the Northern Territory. And there he might have stayed, caught up in the revolving door of the prison system, if it wasn't for the public exposure of shocking videos depicting his treatment on the inside. The images so outraged the nation, the prime minister ordered the Royal Commission into the Protection and Detention of Children in the NT. Despite this Dylan remains a polarising figure. Many people argue he deserved what he received; he was an out of control criminal and the community was safer with him locked up. But as Liz Hayes reports, Dylan doesn't shy away from the criticisms of his behaviour, and what he has to say will surprise many. Game On Reporter Peter Stefanovic used to think computer gaming was not much more than a bit of fun on a lazy afternoon when there was nothing else to do. But on 60 Minutes he discovers how wrong he was when he meets gamers who are so skilled on the keyboard, they actually make a living out of it. In fact, e-sport, as its known, has become a multibillion-dollar industry. The best players earn seven-figure salaries and are treated like celebrities as they tour the world performing in overflowing stadiums you have to see to believe. Turia When Turia Pitt was trapped in a raging bush fire and suffered horrific burns six years ago, she fought an incredible battle just to survive. By coming so close to death she learnt how precious life is and how important it is to live it. Turia's recovery - often painful and slow - continues even today, but it hasn't stopped her walking the Kokoda Track, cycling across Australia and competing in multiple iron woman events. She also devotes a significant amount of her time to raising money and awareness for Interplast, the not-for-profit organisation which provides life-changing surgery and medical training in 17 countries across the Asia-Pacific region. A few weeks ago Turia was about to embark on her latest adventure, climbing to Mt Everest base camp in Nepal.

60 Minutes
44:58

60 Minutes: One Helluva Day/Crook Deal

Nine May 7, 2017

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One Helluva Day February 18 this year was one helluva day for Glenn Dickson. The 25-year-old spear fisherman was 40km off the Far North Queensland coast when he was attacked ...

One Helluva Day February 18 this year was one helluva day for Glenn Dickson. The 25-year-old spear fisherman was 40km off the Far North Queensland coast when he was attacked not once but twice by a 3.5m bull shark. His right leg was severed and his femoral artery ruptured. Glenn couldn't have been in a worse predicament. He was hours away from the medical help he desperately needed and as close to death as a human can get. So much went wrong that day for him, but as he tells Peter Stefanovic, so much more went right. His mates kept reviving him as they raced him to hospital. And he kept on thinking about his fiancee and precious young children. If ever it was needed, Glenn Dickson's story proves how the power of love can be life-saving. Crook Deal Complaining about the greed of the big banks might be a national pastime, but often it's completely justified. Take the National Australia Bank for example. On Thursday it announced a half-yearly cash profit of almost $3.3 billion. It's an impressive result which shareholders have applauded. But to make such enormous amounts of money the bank needs people like Cathy and Terry Maloney - the North Queensland couple who were two of NAB's most loyal and diligently honest customers. They ran a successful tourism business and prided themselves on never falling behind in their loan repayments. But as Ross Coulthart reports, the NAB's treatment of the Maloneys is so diabolical it redefines the concept of bank bastardry. It started when the bank told the couple they must refinance their business, and then introduced them to - and insisted they work with - a convicted criminal who claimed he was a financial expert. The Maloneys didn't stand a chance and they went from prosperity to poverty. But what is most alarming about this crook deal is that it could happen to anyone with a bank loan.

60 Minutes
55:01

60 Minutes: Sins Of The Father/Thin Ice/Richo/Update: American Villain

Nine July 23, 2017

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Sins Of The Father There's never been more scrutiny of the world's major religions, with a series of sex abuse scandals and cover-ups testing the most faithful. But there's an ...

Sins Of The Father There's never been more scrutiny of the world's major religions, with a series of sex abuse scandals and cover-ups testing the most faithful. But there's an equally sinister doctrine being openly preached in small suburban churches scattered around Australia. They call themselves the Independent Baptists, a radical, non-aligned movement with no connection to the mainstream Australian Baptist Ministries. Under the extreme teachings of this church, women must submit to their husband's every whim. Now one very brave victim of this evil doctrine has decided enough is enough. She lived through hell by being married to a so-called Christian pastor who raped her several times a day. She unfortunately discovered that this cruel dogma runs deep, as her own son, also a pastor, has now turned against her. Thin Ice Tonya Harding and Nancy Kerrigan are two of the most famous ice skaters in the world, known not only for their performances but also for one of the biggest scandals in sporting history. The then darling of the rink, Nancy, was knee-capped as she competed for a place on the 1994 US Olympic team. Tonya Harding was accused of being the mastermind of the attack. She was kicked out of ice skating quicker than she could perform the triple axel jump she helped make famous, but that was not the end of this long-running and very ugly sporting spat. Richo If you think politics is bitter and twisted today, it's nothing compared to when Graham Richardson strode the corridors of power. "Richo" was the numbers man back in the heyday of the Hawke and Keating governments, and there was no-one tougher than this head-kicking kingmaker. Twenty-three years ago, however, Senator Richardson unexpectedly quit Parliament. As it turns out, he did it because he had an even greater foe to beat: chondrosarcoma, a devastating cancer in the pelvis. At first Richo battled admirably in his fight, but last year the disease did the unthinkable and began dictating terms to a man very unaccustomed to losing. What this politician did next was both desperate and drastic. Update: American Villain The world's most famous prisoner, OJ Simpson, is about to be a free man. On Friday, the now 70-year-old OJ was granted parole after spending nearly nine years behind bars, and Americans once again tuned-in to watch if the former NFL star would be go free. We've covered the chapters of this saga closely over the years, now it's time for the epilogue.

60 Minutes
36:18

60 Minutes: Hamish And Andy/Breaking The Code

Nine May 28, 2017

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Hamish And Andy Like Dame Edna and Kylie before them, Hamish and Andy have achieved such a level of fame there's no need to bother with their last names. For the record ...

Hamish And Andy Like Dame Edna and Kylie before them, Hamish and Andy have achieved such a level of fame there's no need to bother with their last names. For the record though, they're Blake and Lee. The stars of radio and television have been making Australia laugh for 15 years now, although when the gangly duo first came to our attention, no-one predicted their longevity or celebrity. On 60 Minutes, Hamish and Andy share the rather simple secret to their business success - if they're having fun, then so too will their fans. Liz Hayes is also invited behind the scenes to meet the best mates' families and she discovers there's a new generation of performer who can't wait to steal the show. Breaking The Code In a Brisbane court in May, one of Australia's most horrendous crimes was finally solved when 78-year-old Vince O'Dempsey was found guilty of murdering young mother Barbara McCulkin and her two daughters, 13-year-old Vicki and 11-year-old Leanne. In all likelihood, the evil thug O'Dempsey will now spend the rest of his life in prison, along with another monster, his 70-year-old co-accused, Garry Dubois, who was convicted of the crime in a separate trial late last year. The murders happened 43 years ago and had been one of Queensland's oldest cold cases. But as Ross Coulthart reports in this major 60 Minutes investigation, the brutal crime was only solved because of the incredible dedication of two unassuming police detectives who convinced two vital witnesses to do the unthinkable - to break a four-decade-long criminal code of silence.

60 Minutes
42:50

60 Minutes: Modern Family/Age Of Anxiety

Nine March 12, 2017

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Modern Family It took teenager Corey Maison enormous courage to publicly declare she was trapped in the wrong body; that her mind didn't match her anatomy. She was born a boy, ...

Modern Family It took teenager Corey Maison enormous courage to publicly declare she was trapped in the wrong body; that her mind didn't match her anatomy. She was born a boy, but since early childhood has felt like a girl. She experienced traumatic and lonely years of confusion and frustration but now, 15-year-old Corey is physically transitioning into a young woman. And she no longer feels so alone because her mother Erica has now also identified as transgender and is becoming a man, Eric. In what is thought to be a world first, in the Maison household mother and son are on their way to being father and daughter. And as Tara Brown reports, the rest of this very modern family are supporting Corey and Eric all the way, even though there are now two fathers and no sons. Age Of Anxiety It's perfectly normal to have occasional moments where we feel nervous or worried, even a little fearful sometimes. But what about when those anxious feelings completely overwhelm and consume a person? It can be debilitating and in some cases life-threatening. In Australia today there is an epidemic of anxiety. It's not understood and it's not talked about, but this year a staggering 2 million people will suffer from this crippling condition. However, as Peter Overton discovers in this 60 Minutes special report, there is hope. Ground-breaking new research in Western Australia may hold the key to future treatments, while in Victoria one of man's best friends is proving a real life-saver.

60 Minutes
53:55

60 Minutes: Going For Broke/Look Who's Talking/Reboot of the Nerds

Nine July 10, 2016

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GOING FOR BROKE In the brutal assessments of the election disaster for Malcolm Turnbull, many experts said the Coalition's proposed changes to the superannuation system cost ...

GOING FOR BROKE In the brutal assessments of the election disaster for Malcolm Turnbull, many experts said the Coalition's proposed changes to the superannuation system cost it desperately needed votes. The Prime Minister and Treasurer had claimed super was becoming a tax rort for the wealthy, and there wasn't enough benefit for low and middle-income families. But fiddling with the retirement funds of any Australians is sure to raise tempers. And there's an even bigger problem. Thanks to the new rules, and because we're all living longer, most retirees will run out of money in their 70s and 80s, just when they need it most. In this special report for 60 MINUTES, the Nine Network Finance Editor, Ross Greenwood, questions the government's motives in making the changes and says by going for broke, it risks making superannuation even more confusing for all Australians. LOOK WHO'S TALKING A few weeks ago at the Cincinnati Zoo in the United States a three-year-old boy fell into the gorilla enclosure. A huge silverback appeared to rescue him, but then started to toy with him like a rag doll. Eventually zookeepers shot the animal. It was distressing but they said it was the only way to save the child because they didn't know the gorilla's intentions. But what if humans and animals could talk? Well, in another part of the United States a gorilla named Koko has learnt to communicate. It has taken over 40 years of study, but psychologist Penny Patterson is certain Koko now knows language and can create sentences to express feelings and ideas. And as Ross Coulthart reports, Koko the gorilla just might be the most intriguing interview he's ever done. REBBOT OF THE NERDS There was a time not so long ago when the geeks at school suffered serious teasing. But these days it's all changed. Now many students aspire to be nerds. They're honing their skills in digital technology because they know in the very near future that's where the important careers - and big money - will be found. In fact almost every job will soon require a substantial degree of digital expertise, including computer programming. Brisbane schoolboy Taj Pabari is a great example of what's needed and what can be achieved. At just 16, he's already a businessman, with his own tech company, and an international team working towards a big future.

60 Minutes
50:01

60 Minutes: Keep Out/Top Price

Nine June 19, 2016

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KEEP OUT What would you do if someone walked into your backyard, dug a big hole and put a fence around it with a sign saying 'No Trespassing'? In all likelihood you'd shout ...

KEEP OUT What would you do if someone walked into your backyard, dug a big hole and put a fence around it with a sign saying 'No Trespassing'? In all likelihood you'd shout and scream and call the police. But what if when the police came they threatened to arrest you, not those who wrecked your property and locked you out? In many parts of rural Australia this is the outrageous scenario now playing out between farmers and big gas companies, whose relentless - often ruthless - quest for new sources of gas seems to have no limits. TOP PRICE You have to marvel in awe and wince in pain at Toby Price's commitment to being the best off-road motorcycle racer in the world. At last count, the 28-year-old daredevil from the Hunter Valley had racked up 27 broken bones. His worst riding injury three years ago fractured vertebrae in his neck, which left him perilously close to becoming a quadriplegic. His mum, Pauline, and dad, John, might disagree, but Toby reckons the rewards of hurtling through the desert at breakneck speeds justify the risks. In January this year he became the first Australian to win the Dakar Rally in South America, the most prestigious and gruelling off-road race in the world. And last week he was at it again, winning the Finke Desert race in outback Australia, for an amazing fifth time.

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