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The 101 Who Made The Twentieth Century
49:51

The 101 Who Made The Twentieth Century

Season 1 Episode 6 The History Channel August 9, 2017

Civics and citizenship

Science

Modern history

7-8
9-10
Classification: Mature Classification: Mature
The history of mankind is a never-ending story of change, revolution, evolution - but surely no span of a hundred years can claim to have changed the world so dramatically, so ...

The history of mankind is a never-ending story of change, revolution, evolution - but surely no span of a hundred years can claim to have changed the world so dramatically, so rapidly and so irreversibly as the 20th century. A century where the empires of the past crumbled to make way for new superpowers and a new age. Built on science, exploration, and a desire to express new creative possibilities. A century where the world was drawn into one war after another. But where radio, film, television, cars, planes and finally computers drew us closer together than at any other point in history. It was a century of unprecedented change. Change that was born out of the actions of individuals - what they created, what they discovered, what they destroyed. Who were the 101 people who drove the changes in every aspect of life that made the 20th century and set-up the 21st? A decade and a half since the close of the century we can take a considered look at the people most responsible for the events that changed their world and made ours. In this series we count down - from 101 to No.1 - the names of those who, in the judgement of experts, including those who contribute to the series, most influentially shaped the century and our world. The sixth episode features some major players from war and peace, from east and west. From inventors who have changed the way we live and fight to artists who have given us reasons to do both, we count through 35 to 24 and cover some of the most influential and infamous people who made the twentieth century - a long reigning monarch, a murderous dictator and the "father of the Atom Bomb". Quite a mixture!

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The Lost Tapes
51:10

The Lost Tapes: LA Riots

Season 1 Episode 2 The History Channel September 25, 2018

Modern history

History

11-12
Classification: Mature Classification: Mature
On the afternoon of April 29, 1992, the powder keg that was the city of Los Angeles, exploded. A jury in the all-white community of Simi Valley had just found four white LAPD ...

On the afternoon of April 29, 1992, the powder keg that was the city of Los Angeles, exploded. A jury in the all-white community of Simi Valley had just found four white LAPD officers not guilty in the brutal, videotaped beating of an African American taxi driver named Rodney King. Roiling resentment against the police, which under Chief Daryl Gates had an "us against them" mentality, turned the City of Angeles into a war zone. In South Central, motorists were pulled from their vehicles and beaten. Television viewers saw one white man, Reginald Denny, pulled from his tractor trailer, beaten to a pulp and then witnessed a rioter slam a huge cinder block into the Denny's head while he lay helpless on the ground. The LA riots had begun. For six days the city was under siege, taken over mostly by thugs who used the King verdict as an excuse to run rampant. Stores were looted. Korean shop owners armed themselves and shot anyone who tried to storm their stores. Hundreds of fires burned for days, making LA resemble the oil fields of Iraq when Saddam Hussein's fleeing troops set alight oil wells in the desert. Police abandoned entire neighbourhoods, instead trying to protect upscale enclaves like West Hollywood and Beverly Hills. Daryl Gates said during a press conference "Let it burn". Long standing scores between gangs, neighbours and anyone with a grudge were violently settled.

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